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Archive:What Are You Reading > December 1st to the 11th

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message 1: by Ice, Pilgrim (new)

Ice Bear (Neilar) | 501 comments Moving back to a weekly or bi-weekly cycle. Still looking forward to my extra day in November.

Having finished the Pellinor series I am now in a position to focus on the Millenium Triology.

And for the bedside some Walter Scott poetry !

Today is St Andrews day after all.


message 2: by Magdelanye, Senior Flight Attendant (new)

Magdelanye | 869 comments isnt it 30 days hath November?


message 3: by Ice, Pilgrim (new)

Ice Bear (Neilar) | 501 comments Physician heal thyself !


Jim Continuing into the 'Swann in Love' section of Swann's Way. Also starting Marcel Proust's Search for Lost Time: A Reader's Guide to the Remembrance of Things Past.

I have the feeling that Proust will be one of those perennials that I return to periodically over the years.


message 5: by Magdelanye, Senior Flight Attendant (new)

Magdelanye | 869 comments I remember an older friend recommending that I wait to read Proust until I was over 50. Being just under 30 at the time, I was reluctant to take this advice because I couldnt imagine ever being that old.

Well now I am there and kind of wish I hadnt let myself be convinced, procrastinatop that I am. I want a whole month with nothing else to do but that.

How is it going back and forth with Murakami?


Jim Magdelanye wrote: "I remember an older friend recommending that I wait to read Proust until I was over 50. Being just under 30 at the time, I was reluctant to take this advice because I couldnt imagine ever being tha..."

I finished Murakami Wednesday night. I haven't written a review yet because I'm busy with the launch of Brain Pain, which is going surprisingly well.

I hadn't thought of any comparisons with Proust other than that they are both writers who draw you into their worlds and whose ideas stay with you after you close the book. Proust is something which is going to take time to read and digest. I can easily see the full 7 volumes taking two years to read.


message 7: by Magdelanye, Senior Flight Attendant (new)

Magdelanye | 869 comments I wasnt asking for a comparison of the two, more wondering how compatable or jarring to read in same time frame.


Jim Magdelanye wrote: "I wasnt asking for a comparison of the two, more wondering how compatable or jarring to read in same time frame."

Luckily, I was able to keep them separate, so no real compatibility problems. I'm only halfway thru Swann's Way and I really don't know what to make of the novel. There's a lot to process and I think Proust will be with me for the foreseeable future, no matter what else I'm reading. At some point, I hope to able to read in French. Maybe Le Petit Prince for starters, the down the road, Proust as a stretch goal...

Murakami is definitely jarring in his own right. I think he will become an important part of literary history. Haunting work...


message 9: by Magdelanye, Senior Flight Attendant (last edited Dec 02, 2011 08:52AM) (new)

Magdelanye | 869 comments I am still not up to much, reading another book of stories to carry me through today. Have a couple of contenders waiting for my attention.

In fact,The Secrets of a Fire King is turning out to be a bit of a downer. The stories are all well crafted and pull you right in, but each time so far I am glad to be released.

Soul Work is more satisfying.
This morning I read an appropriate chapter on sheilding from negative people/energy.

Jim: Le Petit Prince n'est pas difficile en francais. By the laws of synchronicity, last week my boss actually acquired such a copy for himself to brush up on his francais.

You must watch Bird Brians irreverent but slightly pertinent
and howlingly funny review


message 10: by Magdelanye, Senior Flight Attendant (new)

Magdelanye | 869 comments back on track with my reading having enjoyed very muchJim HarrisonSundog (Contemporary Classics Sundog by Jim Harrison

and now very engaged by Scribbling the Cat by Alexandra Fuller by Alexandra Fuller


message 11: by Jim (last edited Dec 09, 2011 01:41AM) (new)

Jim Finished Murakami's Pinball, 1973 last night - part two of his early 'Trilogy of The Rat'. Another interesting look at the early career of this literary rock star. I have the third part, A Wild Sheep Chase, but I think I may wait a few weeks before I begin.

Still slogging my way through the 'Swann in Love' section of Swann's Way. Also reading Patrick Alexander's Marcel Proust's Search for Lost Time: A Reader's Guide to the Remembrance of Things Past for a little background support.

Also brushing up on my past studies with Terry Eagleton's Literary Theory: An Introduction. He leans pretty heavily on his Marxist roots, but so far, a good refresher for me. His writing has that nice, hard-edged British bite that helps lower the self-esteem of the undereducated Americans, if you know what I mean - LOL!


message 12: by Magdelanye, Senior Flight Attendant (new)

Magdelanye | 869 comments Jim wrote: "Finished Murakami's Pinball, 1973 last night - part two of his early 'Trilogy of The Rat'. Another interesting look at the early career of this literary rock star. I have the third p..."

wild sheep chase just may be my favorite Murakami and could have been my first. That might somewhat mitigate my appalling ignorance because I had no idea of a trilogy and have not come across the earlier titles.

Murakami is one of those authors I stumbled upon in the library and I read two or three of his books before I caught on to his scope and fame.

I do know what you mean by our shockingly philistine
educational system, and I can say this as a Canadian because we here have a similar narrow range.


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