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The Picture-Book Club > December 2011: Discuss Our "Toys" Club Reads HERE




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message 100: by Crystal (new)

Crystal Marcos (CrystalMarcos) | 477 comments Cheryl in CC NV wrote: "I'm glad to know that Willems was indeed sympatico to toddlers with New Toy - thanks for letting us know!"
Welcome. =)


message 99: by Cheryl (new)

Cheryl (cherylllr) | 2657 comments Mod
I'm glad to know that Willems was indeed sympatico to toddlers with New Toy - thanks for letting us know!


message 98: by Crystal (new)

Crystal Marcos (CrystalMarcos) | 477 comments Kathryn wrote: "I'm very glad you could join in, Crystal! Thank you for posting back. I LOVED Corduroy as a kid (and still love it!) so I hope it becomes one of your daughter's favorites, too :-)"

Thanks Kathryn, I was never introduced to Corduroy as a child. I am glad I finally read the book.


message 97: by Kathryn, The Princess of Picture-Books (new)

Kathryn | 3382 comments Mod
I'm very glad you could join in, Crystal! Thank you for posting back. I LOVED Corduroy as a kid (and still love it!) so I hope it becomes one of your daughter's favorites, too :-)


message 96: by Crystal (last edited Feb 21, 2012 12:03AM) (new)

Crystal Marcos (CrystalMarcos) | 477 comments I am chiming in super late here. I read a couple of these books a while ago but I am finally getting more free time to start being able to post about them.

My toddler really enjoyed I Love My New Toy!. I found it humorous especially since I am around toddlers frequently and it rings true to life. The illustrations were simple but managed to capture feelings of the characters well.

Corduroy has a wholesome, old time feel to it. It was fun seeing things happen from the teddy bear's point of view. My daughter certainly enjoyed it and I was happy to see Corduroy find a loving new home. If I owned it, I could see this one being a book my daughter would ask for often.


message 95: by Manybooks (new)

Manybooks | 2705 comments Dolly wrote: "Finally got ahold of a copy of Sophie and Rose - it certainly reminded me of Dahlia. I loved the illustrations and was reminded of [author:Wendy Anderson Halperin|61581..."

That would be a wonderful story to read together.


message 94: by Dolly (last edited Jan 14, 2012 04:46PM) (new)

Dolly (dollymart) | 249 comments Finally got ahold of a copy of Sophie and Rose - it certainly reminded me of Dahlia. I loved the illustrations and was reminded of Wendy Anderson Halperin's illustrations for the Cobble Street Cousins series. We really enjoyed reading this book together!


message 93: by Kathryn, The Princess of Picture-Books (new)

Kathryn | 3382 comments Mod
June wrote: "Sorry, about posting so late: Family, Holidays, transfer...

Corduroy was my favorite. It was a childhood classic for me. I also love the films which were extremely popular at my L..."


Thank you so much for posting, June! It was great to hear your responses and I'm glad that "Traction Man" resonated with you especially. I agree that the sense of action was great in that one!

Hope things are well and that you are settled in after the holidays and transfer.


message 92: by June (new)

June (june_krell) | 120 comments Sorry, about posting so late: Family, Holidays, transfer...

Corduroy was my favorite. It was a childhood classic for me. I also love the films which were extremely popular at my Library's preschool film program. Partly due to that I always preferred using Beady Bear|1318554]during story time. Beady Bear is shorter. Plus, I seem to associate Corduroy more as a lap book. Unfortunately, I haven't been able to get a hold of the anniversary copy mentioned.

Traction Man Is Here! was a close second. Having two boys, I love any books with boy interest. I loved the feel of action.

I loved getting introduced to Clown. I thought the sneakers were adorable! Abigail's theme "by helping others, we often help ourselves as well." hit the nail on the head for me. I remember using the filmstrip of The Night After Christmas for a story time, that had a similar storyline. I think this is a simpler story, but wouldn't work for me now with groups around 30-50.

I Love My New Toy!. Elephant & Piggie are extremely popular, but I think there are others I've enjoyed more. I can see, however, having 2 boys who go through toys very quickly, the appeal to this story. I thought about trying it for my New Year's toy story time, but didn't get around to it.

I found Sophie and Rose to be a very sweet story. I will definitely recommend it to patrons who seem to go through all our doll stories. I also like its intergenerational tie-in.

Unfortunately, I have not been able to get a hold of Crispin. It sounds like a wonderful book and I will keep an eye out for it.

I really enjoyed the themes and all the comments.


message 91: by Cheryl (new)

Cheryl (cherylllr) | 2657 comments Mod
Finally got Clown. Worth the wait, and I agree with all the positive things others have said. I actually appreciate Blake's art style more now - for some reason I don't particularly like it in the Roald Dahl books. I also love the contrast with stories like The Velveteen Rabbit - Clown is already real, to those who can believe in him. Love can grow from even a most unlikely beginning.


message 90: by Kathryn, The Princess of Picture-Books (new)

Kathryn | 3382 comments Mod
Randie wrote: "The library called me this morning, they were able to get "Crispin: the Pig Who had it All" from the inter-library loan. Yay!

Crispin is the pig who has it all. Every year for Christmas he gets t..."


I'm glad you were able to get it at last! :-)


message 89: by Randie (new)

Randie D. Camp, M.S. (randie87) | 158 comments The library called me this morning, they were able to get "Crispin: the Pig Who had it All" from the inter-library loan. Yay!

Crispin is the pig who has it all. Every year for Christmas he gets the latest most coolest and fanciest toy, but soon he gets bored and the cool toys break. This Christmas he was given the only thing he did not have...an imagination. This special gift also helps Crispin to make friends.

Great story with fun illustrations. Boxes are almost better than toys because they can be anything and take you anywhere. But the special bond between a child and a toy cannot be beat.

I very much enjoyed the theme this month :).


message 88: by Dolly (new)

Dolly (dollymart) | 249 comments Finally got around to reading Traction Man Is Here!. It's not the kind of book that we would normally pick out, but we really liked it. We are going to the library today and will look for one of the other stories featuring this character: Traction Man Meets Turbo Dog and Traction Man and the Beach Odyssey.

Since school is out, I haven't been able to borrow the school's copy of Sophie and Rose yet, but I'll be sure to do that the next time I get out to the school.


message 87: by Kathryn, The Princess of Picture-Books (new)

Kathryn | 3382 comments Mod
For those who enjoy the imaginative play opportunity boxes afford, I would recommend, in addition to Christina Katerina & the Box, Not a Box, which is suitable for the younger picture book crowd and has delightful illustrations.


message 86: by Kathryn, The Princess of Picture-Books (new)

Kathryn | 3382 comments Mod
As for the one eyed doll, I do find them a bit creepy in general, though I don't remember being disturbed about the one in Sophie and Rose. I think so much depends on the situation--for example, in two "Toy Story" movies we have a scary baby doll (in the first one the baby doll head on the spidery contraption, in the third movie the baby doll side kick to Lots O') yet as the story progresses and you learn more about the backgrounds of the "scary" characters, they do not seem as creepy once you understand how they became that way and that they are not bad at heart. In terms of my own toys, I had many that suffered "injuries" over the years, missing limbs and whatnot, and I still loved them just the same.


message 85: by Kathryn, The Princess of Picture-Books (new)

Kathryn | 3382 comments Mod
Chandra wrote: "I agree that aspect of Corduroy is nice. I noticed that Lisa wasn't white when I read it as a child and I remember finding it kind of intriguing but not giving it a huge deal of thought. More not..."

I felt much the same about "Corduroy" when I was a kid. While I did notice that Lisa is black, the differences I focused on were more about where she lived (like Chandra, I did not grow up in a city or apartment) and I found that aspect utterly fascinating ;-)


message 84: by Cheryl (new)

Cheryl (cherylllr) | 2657 comments Mod
I totally love Scaredy Squirrel, especially the first. Before my body adapted to be able to adjust perimenopausal symptoms I was chronically fretful and worried about so much unrealistic junk that I almost went for therapy. After reading a bunch of Watt's books (including the Chester ones) I was nudged sufficiently into health to be able to employ other natural coping strategies.

So, yeah, being able to identify with the characters of a book has a lot to do with the appeal - and I do think Willems has created some very real & believable toddlers in Gerald and in Piggie.


message 83: by Randie (new)

Randie D. Camp, M.S. (randie87) | 158 comments David wrote: "As far as fearful, emotional characters go, in addition to Elephant and Piggie, I think of the Scaredy Squirrel series of books. Scaredy tries to be rational in making action plans, b..."

My five-year-old loves Scaredy Squirrel, I'm not sure why I can't get into those books but kids do love them :).


message 82: by David (new)

David | 101 comments As far as fearful, emotional characters go, in addition to Elephant and Piggie, I think of the Scaredy Squirrel series of books. Scaredy tries to be rational in making action plans, but the irrational fear always takes over, eventually followed by a realization that things didn't go as horribly as feared. Those books always crack me up!


message 81: by Randie (new)

Randie D. Camp, M.S. (randie87) | 158 comments "On the other hand, children do have strong emotions at times, and I really appreciated the fact that the strong emotions were acknowledged as being true, even if they were not necessarily accepted and seen as completely justified."

Well said, Gundula. I completely agree.

Willems characters Gerald and Piggie show the same emotions that typical children do. Sometimes happy and other times sad. Sometimes angry and other times excited. Sometimes over-the-top, yes. Sometimes irrational, for sure. But that what makes the characters real, relevant, and meaningful for readers.


message 80: by Manybooks (new)

Manybooks | 2705 comments Cheryl in CC NV wrote: "Abigail, I think part of my reaction to I Love My New Toy! depends on the fact that I have enjoyed other books in the series. And until this book I'd never seen such strong emotion,..."

On the other hand, children do have strong emotions at times, and I really appreciated the fact that the strong emotions were acknowledged as being true, even if they were not necessarily accepted and seen as completely justified.


message 79: by Cheryl (new)

Cheryl (cherylllr) | 2657 comments Mod
Abigail, I think part of my reaction to I Love My New Toy! depends on the fact that I have enjoyed other books in the series. And until this book I'd never seen such strong emotion, especially anger. It was provocative, almost disturbing.


message 78: by Randie (new)

Randie D. Camp, M.S. (randie87) | 158 comments My library was able to find Traction Man, here are my thoughts:

A young boy gets a Traction Man action figure for Christmas and the second he is opened, the adventure begins. Traction Man battles evil pillows, escapes a poisonous dishcloth, acquires a sidekick, and survives the embarrassment of Granny's Christmas gift. Grey captures the special bond that children have with their toys in this fun, adventurous story. The bright, comic-like illustrations bring the young boy's imagination to life.

I also picked up the sequel with Turbodog, it was just as good. Grey is brilliant, I could definitely read more books of Traction Man's adventures.


message 77: by Manybooks (new)

Manybooks | 2705 comments Cheryl in CC NV wrote: "That's a good point about the one-eyed doll, David. Hmm... thinking... if it were a one-eyed friend, would you similarily want her to hide her deformity? Certainly not, as you're not that insensi..."

Although the one-eyed doll is a bit creepy (if it had been my doll, I would perhaps have drawn in another eye or tried to find some kind of similar replacement), I do love the message it shows, to love and cherish one's toys even if said toys show imperfections. And, one can also transfer this message to dealing with not just toys, but people, to love and appreciate all people, even those who might face physical challenges, such as blindness, amputations etc.


message 76: by ABC (new)

ABC (Mary6543) | 344 comments Ronyell~~I also find the illustrations in "Clown" rather dreary. I don't think Blake is such a good illustrator for a wordless picture book like this.

I think he is excellent supporting a full length book, like the Roald Dahl books. Then his slightly skewed style perfectly complements Dahl's slightly skewed writing.


message 75: by Cheryl (new)

Cheryl (cherylllr) | 2657 comments Mod
That's a good point about the one-eyed doll, David. Hmm... thinking... if it were a one-eyed friend, would you similarily want her to hide her deformity? Certainly not, as you're not that insensitive. So, was Halperin showing us that we should love our 'deformed' friends as much as we love our 'normal' ones? And why doesn't the girl play with the cat more? Hm....


message 74: by David (last edited Dec 26, 2011 06:31PM) (new)

David | 101 comments Clown is a dark, funny imaginative, wordless story that will please many. The action filled plot could be interpreted at different levels, according to the maturity of the reader. The attitude shown toward Clown seemed mean to me at time: getting thrown out the window by one mother and thrown by the bully with the mean dog. Hopefully these days more people would consider giving or donating used toys rather than tossing them away. I liked the detailed ink and water color illustrations.

I Love My New Toy (Elephant and Piggie) by Mo Willems is spot-on in showing the emotions when one friend appears to have broken his friend's new toy. Willems' ability to display the emotions of his characters is put to good use in this tale. The ending dialog is perfect! The illustrations are fun as always. My favorites include Piggy showing Gerald her toy, Gerald throwing the toy, the toy zooming toward the ground, the squirrel snapping the toy together, and the final illustration. I really enjoyed Squirrel's appearance in the book.

Sophie and Rose by Kathryn Lasky, is a simple, sweet story of how Rose becomes Sophie's companion through imagination and adventures. Halperin's illustrations, done in pencil and watercolor, fit this slightly old fashioned story well. I particularly liked the image of the attic, showing a moosehead, unicycle, skis, trunk, roses and a toy horse.

This story is obviously a "girl" story, but has some appealing elements. I'm a bit surprised that Rose didn't play more with the cat that turned up in many pictures. The well loved doll reminds me of my mother and her sister who each had dolls: my mother's still had a dress, while my aunt's doll was naked and worse for wear! I also find the one eyed doll to be a little creepy. I would have considered going with an eye patch or go for some sun glasses, but that's just me!

Traction Man Is Here by Mini Grey, featuring a superhero, is a great book for reluctant readers & for kids who enjoy making up stories when they play. The mix of play fantasy & everyday interactions with parents & relatives is quite entertaining. The comic book look, with occasional word bubbles as in graphic novels, should really attract kids. I really enjoy the detailed illustrations by Mini Grey showing many household and outside views (I especially enjoyed the clutter around the back of the boy's bed.) The action and dialog will attract readers.

I was unable to get Crispin, as my library system only carries it in Spanish.

Of the books I read, Corduroy (reviewed in an earlier post) is my favorite, followed by I Love My New Toy! and Traction Man is Here!


message 73: by Kathryn, The Princess of Picture-Books (new)

Kathryn | 3382 comments Mod
Chandra wrote: "Hi all! Just going to weigh in with my thoughts!

Like many of you Corduroy is a childhood favorite of mine. I loved just about everything about it. It has great dramatic tensio..."


Thanks for sharing your thoughts, Chandra! And, I'm adding "Luke and Longnose" to Mt. TBR! :-)


message 72: by Kathryn, The Princess of Picture-Books (new)

Kathryn | 3382 comments Mod
Cheryl in CC NV wrote: "Thank you Jenny for sharing with us how the target audience relates to Elephant and Piggie! Great insights in all your post"

Ditto!


message 71: by Ronyell (new)

Ronyell (Rabbitearsblog) | 209 comments I've just read Clown and while I really enjoyed the story, I thought that the illustrations were a little too dreary for my tastes. I loved the story however and I loved how the toy clown was trying to find all the other toys a home to stay in and I thought that the ending was really cute.


message 70: by Cheryl (new)

Cheryl (cherylllr) | 2657 comments Mod
Thank you Jenny for sharing with us how the target audience relates to Elephant and Piggie! Great insights in all your post - much appreciated as it's been over ten years since I had access to a rugrat!


message 69: by Jenny (new)

Jenny | 583 comments Thanks for the suggestion, Kirei. I will add them to my "to read" list.

We enjoyed the Piggy and Gerald books, partly because they can be read independently by beginning readers. I agree that Gerald wasn't thinking through the consequences... I loved that the toy was easily fixed (wish that were always the case!). I also didn't mind that at the end, they went off to play together, leaving the toy behind. Toddlers are easily distracted and often play with a toy for only a few minutes before moving on to another activity...I don't think that negates how much Piggie loved the toy...just showed that he loved Gerald even more and I'm sure they would return to the toy at another time. They remind me a lot of my 3 yo and her best friend.
They love each other, but also get mad at each other and do mean things on occasion...because they are 3 and don't really know better or just don't think before they act.


Sophie and Rose was a beautiful book. I loved the details in the illustrations. My girls also enjoyed the details and felt sad when the doll lost her eye. I loved that the doll had been passed down to her...and that she cared so lovingly for it.

Traction Man Is Here! was cute but not my favorite. Perhaps because I grew up with only sister and have only daughters... my kids certainly use their imagination, but not in the same ways. They did find the knitted green outfit that grandma made quite humorous and we all loved when it unraveled and turned into his swim suit. :) While I appreciated the boy's imagination and the "adventures" that Traction Man had, it somehow just didn't appeal as much as the others.

I have Clown and hope to get to it tomorrow.


message 68: by Kathryn, The Princess of Picture-Books (new)

Kathryn | 3382 comments Mod
Kirei wrote: "Jenny--Read Raggedy Ann Stories. Raggedy Ann is originally the girl's grandma's, but I think was kept in a trunk for all those years. The Raggedy Ann stories are similar to Toy Stor..."

I definitely want to give these a try sometime :-)


message 67: by Kathryn, The Princess of Picture-Books (new)

Kathryn | 3382 comments Mod
Cheryl in CC NV wrote: "I think Gerald's behavior (throwing the toy) was out of character. I don't think he was being devious, but he was being a little aggressive.
I think they're toddlers, and Gerald wasn't thinking..."


Thank you for the insights, Cheryl. I am not that familiar with the Piggy and Gerald series, so that does make sense. Like you, given the situation, I do feel a little more respect should have been given to Piggy, but I do see your point that Gerald was just being excited and thinking about the immediate fun, rather than potential negative consequences. I like that interpretation better than the one I had! ;-)


message 66: by ABC (new)

ABC (Mary6543) | 344 comments Jenny--Read Raggedy Ann Stories. Raggedy Ann is originally the girl's grandma's, but I think was kept in a trunk for all those years. The Raggedy Ann stories are similar to Toy Story, except the Raggedy Ann toys are always happy. There is no jealousy and they always help each other.

I don't know that it is the greatest literature, but it was interesting from a children's lit perspective.


message 65: by Cheryl (new)

Cheryl (cherylllr) | 2657 comments Mod
I think Gerald's behavior (throwing the toy) was out of character. I don't think he was being devious, but he was being a little aggressive.
I think they're toddlers, and Gerald wasn't thinking far enough ahead to the possible consequences, just as human toddlers don't/can't.

And I think more respect should have been accorded Piggie for getting upset, rather than making her feel as if she should have controlled her outburst.

This was def. not one my favorite Mo Willems books. But of course it is still valuable and entertaining and I'm glad I read it and I would share it if I had access to a small child.


message 64: by Kathryn, The Princess of Picture-Books (new)

Kathryn | 3382 comments Mod
Corduroy was one of my childhood favorites and I still love it! I am struggling to write an adequate review, and since I am pressed for time I will just say for now that I love everything about it! I feel all the emotions are conveyed so well, from Corduroy's loneliness to the girl's sense of finding a "kindred spirit" in the bear, to Corduroy's wish to find the button to make himself more appealing, to his glorious adventure (oh, how I loved that escalator "mountain" and the many fabulous mattresses, and tugging and tugging to get that button off!), to the fright with the night watchman and finally Lisa coming back with her own money to bring Corduroy home and sewing on the button, not because she felt anything was wrong with him, but so he would feel more comfortable. I love the end, with the realization of what it feels like to have a true friend. And the illustrations have always captivated me!

I am so grateful David alerted us to the 40th Anniversary edition. It is just wonderful! I love the format (with the letters between Don and his editor being "real" letters you can pull out of envelopes, and facsimile versions at that) and the glimpse into the writer-editor relationship. The manuscript draft where his editor makes her comments is so enlightening and would interest anyone who is or is interested in being a writer, I think (it's great to see that even genius authors like Don Freeman needed that collaboration and other insight to make their work truly sparkle). The only thing I didn't really like in the format is that it seemed really jarring to go from the vivid correspondence to turning the page and seeing it covered with newspaper clipping of Freeman's obituary. Though it did provide some great insight into more facets of his life, I guess I would have liked something a bit gentler. I also would have liked to know a bit more about the children to whom he dedicated the book and spoke of in his correspondence (I guess they might be relations of the editor, perhaps?) All in all, though, I highly recommend the 40th Anniversary edition to anyone who is a fan of the book or looking at a bygone era of author-editor relationships.


message 63: by Kathryn, The Princess of Picture-Books (new)

Kathryn | 3382 comments Mod
I Love My New Toy! is so funny! I love how Mo Willems is able to convey so much emotion with just a few words and his wonderful illustrations. I'm not sure that this was my favorite of his works, though. I guess I wanted a tad more resolution on one point, and maybe some of you can help: do you think the elephant was being devious when he said "Maybe it is a throwing toy?" Because he looked rather devious when he suggested it, but then he seemed genuinely shocked when the toy broke. It seemed like the little pig had more right to be angry with his friend if the friend really didn't believe it was a throwing toy than if it had been a true accident. What did you think?

Crispin: The Pig Who Had It All was really cute. It reminded me of a more splashy, modern version of Christina Katerina & the Box, which was one of my favorite books as a kid. I loved the imagination Crispin discovered and the friendships he made through it.


message 62: by Randie (last edited Dec 20, 2011 08:43AM) (new)

Randie D. Camp, M.S. (randie87) | 158 comments Jenny- I understand the feelings of guilt that the movie causes. I have a handful of toys that I hold on to (well, they are packed away in the hall closet) and my son really struggles with donating old toys. But we still manage to donate quite a bit of unused toys to a local program each year.

I also loved the Velveteen Rabbit but I think I loved it because my big sister loved it, lol. But being able to make a toy real through love is a message worth believing in too.

David Shannon is a favorite of ours. I think children can easily relate to Spencer from Too Many Toys.


message 61: by Jenny (new)

Jenny | 583 comments I have never liked Toy Story. I hated the idea that toys were alive and felt sad if you started to neglect them or gave them away. I mean I had some favorite toys that I really loved... but it's just impossible to love all of the toys you have or to keep all of them. Maybe if it had come out when I was younger (I was in college) then I might have liked it...but it felt guilt-inducing rather than pleasurable to me. On the other hand, I loved The Velveteen Rabbit and the idea that a toy that was really, truly loved would become real. I had my parents read that to me over and over and read it to myself over and over...in a couple of different versions. I guess that has a similar concept but it felt doable...love one toy a lot, not try to love and save a bunch of toys all of your life. I mean when I went off to college, I had one teddy bear left from when I was a kid (and plenty of books that I had my parents store)... but the rest were long gone.

Anyway, I read Corduroy a lot when I was young. I loved those books. I read Corduroy to my children tonight. They like it. I don't think it is a favorite for them like it was for me (and not sure I would put it on a favorites list now), but I think the idea of a toy having that kind of adventure in the toy store and then finding a girl to really love him appealed to the same part of me that loved The Velveteen Rabbit.

Crispin: The Pig Who Had It All was darling! I really liked this book and so did my kids. It's so true that boxes are often the best toys. Four years ago we bought a treadmill at Christmastime. My husband cut a door and two windows out of that big box and drew little flower windowboxes and other designs on it. We kept it inside for 3 or 4 months and then moved it outside when the weather got warmer. We had just 2 girls at that time and they seriously played house and had adventures in that box nearly daily for 6 months until a bad rainstorm ruined it. They still sometimes talk about it. I liked how the box encouraged his imagination and helped him make friends. It reminded me a little of Too Many Toys by David Shannon, which is a book that my kids and I all love.

I've read all of the others except Clown and will get back here tomorrow to post my thoughts on them.


message 60: by Kathryn, The Princess of Picture-Books (new)

Kathryn | 3382 comments Mod
I'm so excited because my library *does* have the fabulous 40th Anniversary edition of Corduroy that David talks about. I have it on reserve and hope to read it next week, along with the other two titles I haven't got to yet.


message 59: by Kathryn, The Princess of Picture-Books (new)

Kathryn | 3382 comments Mod
Cheryl in CC NV wrote: "Heh, I feel older. My oldest son turned *10* in 1995, when Toy Story came out. Just sayin'."

;-)


message 58: by Cheryl (new)

Cheryl (cherylllr) | 2657 comments Mod
Heh, I feel older. My oldest son turned *10* in 1995, when Toy Story came out. Just sayin'.


message 57: by Kathryn, The Princess of Picture-Books (new)

Kathryn | 3382 comments Mod
Randie wrote: "I think 2015. Tom Hanks said it was in the works, I saw it online, maybe huffingtonpost. "

Thanks, I'm off to look it up :-)


message 56: by Randie (new)

Randie D. Camp, M.S. (randie87) | 158 comments Kathryn wrote: "Randie wrote: "**A side note: I was eight-years-old when Disney/Pixar’s Toy Story came out. I loved it. I grew up with this beautiful notion that toys are real, they have feelings, they go on adven..."

I think 2015. Tom Hanks said it was in the works, I saw it online, maybe huffingtonpost.


message 55: by Kathryn, The Princess of Picture-Books (new)

Kathryn | 3382 comments Mod
Randie wrote: "**A side note: I was eight-years-old when Disney/Pixar’s Toy Story came out. I loved it. I grew up with this beautiful notion that toys are real, they have feelings, they go on adventures, and they love unconditionally. My son is also growing up with the movies (fyi- a 4th movie is in the works) and as an only child, his toys are even more loved than mine were. Blake’s Clown captures this idea without all the hoopla of a fancy animated movie. It is an instant favorite! "

I love your post, Randie. Though, you do make me feel old, haha! Even though I was in my teens when that movie came out, it did speak so much to my childhood and how well I loved my toys, and how my imagination was boundless. By the way, I am so excited to hear a 4th "Toy Story" is in the works. Where did you hear about that? Any idea what it will be about or when it will open? Thanks! :-D


message 54: by Randie (new)

Randie D. Camp, M.S. (randie87) | 158 comments My review/thoughts about Clown: A toy clown and some other toys are thrown away. The clown comes to life and ventures out into the city to find someone to save the other toys-- but no one seems to want old, worn out toys. Clown is not discouraged. His determination and devotion to his friends is inspiring.

Blake's squiggly ink lines and water-colored illustrations are not only brilliant but are fascinating enough to capture the action, emotions, and message of Clown’s story without words.

**A side note: I was eight-years-old when Disney/Pixar’s Toy Story came out. I loved it. I grew up with this beautiful notion that toys are real, they have feelings, they go on adventures, and they love unconditionally. My son is also growing up with the movies (fyi- a 4th movie is in the works) and as an only child, his toys are even more loved than mine were. Blake’s Clown captures this idea without all the hoopla of a fancy animated movie. It is an instant favorite!


message 53: by David (new)

David | 101 comments I'm going to comment separately here about Corduroy and discuss the other books later.

Corduroy by Don Freeman clearly tells Corduory's story, while winning the sympathy of the reader as Corduroy earnestly works to solve his problem while marveling at the many new things he discovers, and striving to find a home and a friend.

Corduroy will awaken the memories of toys beloved in the past, as well as childhood dependence on others, and the joy of finding a friend.

The copy I found at my home branch library was the 40th anniversary edition (2008) with great extras: some original sketches, a complete early draft of the manuscript, letters between Don and his publisher, & two obituaries for Freeman. Originally Corduory never pulled on the buttons on the matress, and Lisa went home with Corduroy packed inside a gift box!

I have often read this book in Preschool or K-2 storytimes, as it is one of my favorite read-alouds. When I did, I usually told the story with a Corduroy stuffed bear on my lap. For prescholers, I let them hug it individually at the end. I've also used the film version in storytimes, which is somewhat different from the book but has some funny additions.

I hope children will continue to discover this classic for years to come.


message 52: by Randie (new)

Randie D. Camp, M.S. (randie87) | 158 comments I just ordered "Clown" from Amazon, it just sounds too good to pass up.


message 51: by ABC (new)

ABC (Mary6543) | 344 comments When I realized Clown was a wordless book, I borrowed it from our Japanese library.

I noticed the message of rescuing and recycling the toys at the end. It reminded me of a certain famous movie I won't mention (due to spoilers).

As far as toys go, I am actually trying to avoid buying the toys. Nobody in Japan wants other people's old toys. I have enough trouble giving away ds's clothes. (Nobody seems to want them, either.)


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Books mentioned in this topic

Sophie and Rose (other topics)
Traction Man Is Here! (other topics)
I Love My New Toy! (other topics)
Clown (other topics)
Crispin: The Pig Who Had It All (other topics)
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Authors mentioned in this topic

Mo Willems (other topics)
Wendy Anderson Halperin (other topics)