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Was Amram a coward and murderer?

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Donna I am not certain I understand why The Man from the Valley and Shirah considered Amram to be a coward and murderer when he killed Aziza. Wasn't he supposed to kill her as Shirah's beloved killed her when the time came? Was it because Amram came up from behind Aziza when he killed her instead of facing her?


Rina I don't really know, but I've thought about it aswell. Maybe it's because The Man from the Valley loved Aziza so he couldn't help but hate her murderer. Same goes for Shirah.

Amram didn't know it was Aziza before he killed her, though, he thought it was her brother.


Donna Karina wrote: "I don't really know, but I've thought about it aswell. Maybe it's because The Man from the Valley loved Aziza so he couldn't help but hate her murderer. Same goes for Shirah.

Amram didn't know it ..."

I think that Amram knew it was Aziza when he killed her. But only afterward when he saw the medallion did he know that she was the warrior who saved his life, not her brother.


message 4: by Leann (last edited Jun 07, 2012 03:55PM) (new) - rated it 4 stars

Leann I agree with you, Donna, that Amram knew it was Aziza. He just didn't know she was the warrior until he saw the medallion.

My take is that Amram did not kill Aziza for love or duty, he resented her for leaving him. Maybe that is at least part of the reason that The Man from the Valley and Shirah had no respect for Amram. Also, Aziza didn't agree/offer her neck to be slashed. That makes the act different, at least to me.


Elizabeth Also keep in mind that The Man from the Valley did not regard Amram as a true warrior because while in battle he killed women and children.


message 6: by Leann (last edited Jun 07, 2012 03:58PM) (new) - rated it 4 stars

Leann Good point, Elizabeth.

Shirah intended Yael, Revka and the children to escape. Did she think that Aziza might join them?


Tina Leann wrote: "Good point, Elizabeth.

Shirah intended Yael, Revka and the children to escape. Did she think that Aziza might join them?"


She probably hoped that maybe her eldest would escape.


Elizabeth Tina wrote: "Leann wrote: "Good point, Elizabeth.

Shirah intended Yael, Revka and the children to escape. Did she think that Aziza might join them?"

She probably hoped that maybe her eldest would escape."


As a mother, I am sure she hoped that Aziza would join them in the escape. But Shirah also knew that Aziza's destiny that she had to fulfill was as a warrior. She would not be true to who she was if she escaped rather than died a warriors death. Her soul would be in turmoil eternally. Just as Shirah's destiny was to end her life with her true love, Eleazar ben Ya'ir.

I expected Yael to be the survivor. And it made sense that Revka, who really was an iron willed woman, would also make it.


message 9: by S.C. (new) - added it

S.C. Langgle I agree with Donna and Elizabeth. Shirah says that Amram killed Aziza to possess her, as he couldn't in life, rather than out of his sense of duty. Shirah also says that Aziza "would not have suspected an attack from someone who had loved her so well" (p. 469), which adds to the sense of Amram as betrayer.


Beverly The simple answer would seem that The Man from the Valley loved Aziza and would have that sort of negative passion when he killed Amram. But the deeper layers is why I loved the book. Amram tragically relized she was the warrior who fought beside him and saved his life and had feelings of regret. Also he had feelings of jealousy and rejection. And The Man from the Valley had inside knowledge of what Aziza went through when she witnessed women and children brutally killed. Which again is why I liked the book so much it has many layers.


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