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COFFEE, TEA AND CONVERSATION > THE HISTORY OF WHERE YOU LIVE




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message 201: by Bentley, Group Founder, Leader, Chief (new)

Bentley | 25177 comments Tamara wrote: "I live in Gold Country, highway 49 California. We have the very large Empire Mine along with a few other large gold mines around town. I think they made the play Paint Your Wagon after our town and..."

Hello Tamara - what an interesting post - let us hope everything stays stable. I am assuming that the mines are stone or rock based which may give you no worries.

A Victorian Gentlewoman in the Far West  The Reminiscences of Mary Hallock Foote by Mary Hallock Foote by Mary Hallock Foote (no photo)

AND

Angle of Repose by Wallace Stegner by Wallace StegnerWallace Stegner

Remember there are three parts to a citation - always the bookcover if available, always the author's photo if available and always the author's link which is the author's name in linkable text.

Thank you for giving it the old college try - next time just go back in a third time for the last segment. And you can type in the word by between the html of the bookcover and before the html of the author's photo.


message 200: by Bentley, Group Founder, Leader, Chief (last edited Aug 04, 2013 02:24PM) (new)

Bentley | 25177 comments Mansoor wrote: "Folks I've started a traveling blog about my recent travels up north on a motor bike from Peshawar Pakistan. Came across some lovely places n sceneries, thought it's befitting to share with you. Ch..."

Hello Mansoor - now we know what you look like and we have some great scenery of Pakistan. And you are right it is very beautiful scenery and country.

However after reading this paragraph - I sense that I will not be doing this route or Pakistan any time soon:

Mansoor wrote:
The clouds blackened the sky and we chatted, played cards and enjoyed the weather. All of the sudden there was a huge blast, thinking the worse I thought as any sane Pakistani would have thought it to be a terrorist attack or some suicidal. Thankfully, it was an earthquake. The momentary tension was passed over. The place was out of the world with lightening and thunder surrounded by towering mountains littered with tall forests it was a scene set in romanticism. The dinner was great and my body required rest so I hit the bed and off I went thinking about the next day and its travels.

I shook my head thinking a natural disaster was a better outcome than the other more unthinkable causes.

I guess folks from Pakistan learn to live with these dangers every single day - believe me you are in my thoughts and prayers - and be safe. I am glad that you got to do your dream road trip and kudos to your wife for letting you have that great escape from the day to day activities.

Please post more of your travels - I found it very interesting and the photos were great.

And as an added note - to think you traveled the same route as Churchill too - pretty heady stuff. Your boss sounds like a great one - he gave you a chance to do a trip that you will never forget.


message 199: by Bentley, Group Founder, Leader, Chief (new)

Bentley | 25177 comments Greg wrote: "I am familiar with John Brown's story, particularly from Tony Horowitz' Midnight Rising, but learned about a new connection to the Boston area today. On a trip out to the Civil War era fort, Fort W..."

Remember there are three parts to a citation - always the bookcover if available, always the author's photo if available and always the author's link which is the author's name in linkable text.

Midnight Rising  John Brown and the Raid That Sparked the Civil War by Tony Horwitz by Tony HorwitzTony Horwitz

Thank you for giving it the old college try - next time just go back in a third time for the last segment. And you can type in the word by between the html of the bookcover and before the html of the author's photo.


message 198: by Tamara (last edited Aug 04, 2013 12:13PM) (new)

Tamara (Marata) | 3 comments I live in Gold Country, highway 49 California. We have the very large Empire Mine along with a few other large gold mines around town. I think they made the play Paint Your Wagon after our town and we hope none of the streets cave in from all the miles of mine shafts under the streets.
A Victorian Gentlewoman in the Far West  The Reminiscences of Mary Hallock Foote by Mary Hallock Foote Angle of Repose by Wallace Stegner


Kathy  | 112 comments Mansoor wrote: "Folks I've started a traveling blog about my recent travels up north on a motor bike from Peshawar Pakistan. Came across some lovely places n sceneries, thought it's befitting to share with you. Ch..."

Thank you so much for posting your adventures! This is something I will never be able to do, but through your postings I feel I am experiencing it myself.


Mansoor Azam (azam69) | 21 comments Folks I've started a traveling blog about my recent travels up north on a motor bike from Peshawar Pakistan. Came across some lovely places n sceneries, thought it's befitting to share with you. Check out n share along may be you can see a side of Pakistan missed by media in general. Sharing the link

http://travelcrazypakistan.blogspot.com


message 195: by Gregory (last edited Aug 03, 2013 05:22PM) (new)

Gregory Flemming (greg_flemming) | 25 comments I am familiar with John Brown's story, particularly from Tony Horowitz' Midnight Rising, but learned about a new connection to the Boston area today. On a trip out to the Civil War era fort, Fort Warren, which is located on George's Island in Boston Harbor, I discovered that the song "John Brown's Body" was written by soldiers stationed at Fort Warren during the civil war. When these Massachusetts soldiers sang the song as they marched through New York, it gained widespread attention, and the tune was used as the basis for a song that became far more famous, the Battle Hymn of the Republic. For anyone living in or visiting Boston, Fort Warren and other harbor islands are easily reached and full of history.
Midnight Rising  John Brown and the Raid That Sparked the Civil War by Tony Horwitz Tony Horwitz


Jeffrey Zeltzer | 8 comments I will try.


message 193: by Bentley, Group Founder, Leader, Chief (new)

Bentley | 25177 comments Jeffrey - I gave to the link where folks comment on the books they are reading and I showed you how to do the citation properly which you have not corrected.

If the above link is not satisfactory for you - then place it on the Second World War threads in the second world war folder. It does not belong here.


Jeffrey Zeltzer | 8 comments I am having no luck. Can not find the appropriate spots to comment.


message 191: by Bentley, Group Founder, Leader, Chief (last edited Jun 27, 2013 06:08AM) (new)

Bentley | 25177 comments Jeffrey, I think you posted message 190 in the wrong spot - this is the thread of history of where you live (smile)

Additionally, you must cite the book you read this way:

(no image) Psychology of Dictatorship Based on an Examination of the Leaders of Nazi Germany by G. M. Gilbert (no photo)

Normally we add the bookcover when available and if is not available, then we place the words no image in parens before the link then we type in the word by and then we add the author's photo and the author's link.

In the case of this book there was no author's photo so we just add the link and then add (no photo) at the end indicating that we did look for the photo and there was none.

The goodreads software populates this information across our site and the goodreads site. Therefore you can find on our site how many times an author or a book was mentioned on a particular thread, on what threads either the book or the author was discussed depending upon whether you are accessing the author's link or the book link. And of course the links take you to other information on the site.

You might have been looking for this thread:

http://www.goodreads.com/topic/show/1...


Jeffrey Zeltzer | 8 comments Just finished reading this tome. Written by a psychologist in 1950. He was one of the panel of psychologists who examined the Nazi defendants during the Nuremberg trials of 1946. It is a detailed psychological examination of the defendants as to how such a thing could have happened. Not an easy summer read. Would suggest keeping a dictionary handy. While only 318 pages it took me a full two weeks to read and digest. Psychology of Dictatorship Based on an Examination of the Leaders of Nazi Germany


Marren | 50 comments Mark wrote: "Marren wrote: "St.Lucia, West Indies."

Reference is made to your posts on St. Lucia and the History Club thread game of cricket. Some years ago I noticed promotional signs noting that China and Ta..."


Dole and Chiquita have the monopoly on banana trade in the USA. We trade our bananas with England, at the beginning of trade it was easier since we were a former British Colony. The island's banana production is much lower and tourism as a bread earner receives more money and attention. I really hope you get to taste our banana again. I have one mostly every morning :)


message 188: by Bentley, Group Founder, Leader, Chief (last edited Mar 09, 2013 10:58AM) (new)

Bentley | 25177 comments There is always more to the story:

http://www.usatoday.com/story/news/na...

http://www.foxnews.com/us/2013/02/06/...

http://bigstory.ap.org/article/confed...

I think that Memphis is racially divided and maybe they were trying to simmer feelings down on both sides.

However, this is what noted historian Harold Holzer had to say:

Civil War historian Harold Holzer said that while he thinks Forrest was an "evil character," history is not served by removing references to the past in public places.

However, moving forward, more cities are likely to follow Memphis' lead, Holzer said.

"Playing with names and titles and statues in a way to pretend that memory doesn't exist in a different plane for different people and different generations is a mistake," said Holzer, a Roger Hertog fellow at the New-York Historical Society. "It actually takes away from history."

We could also look how the Jewish people handled Aushwitz and other such locations - they served as a reminder that we should never allow such things to happen ever again. The location became a museum and a memorial to those who were so unfortunate and lost their lives needlessly.

Harold HolzerHarold Holzer


J.D.R. Hawkins (JDRHawkins) | 2 comments Because I am interested in the Civil War, there is a lot of fascinating history about Memphis. Recently, the Memphis City Council decided to change the names of three Civil War themed parks. They are Confederate Park, Jefferson Davis Park, and Forrest Park, named after Confederate General Nathan Bedford Forrest. When certain historical groups learned of this, they naturally protested. Even the KKK threatened to get involved. Personally, I think that choosing political correctness over historical significance is a shame.


Alisa (MsTaz) | 5313 comments There were other self promotional aspects in addition the the blog link. Please edit your post accordingly.


J.D.R. Hawkins (JDRHawkins) | 2 comments Alisa wrote: "We do not allow marketing and self promotion on this site, including links to blogs. Please see the club guidelines for clarification. Thank you."

Ok sorry. Could you post it and leave off my link?


Alisa (MsTaz) | 5313 comments We do not allow marketing and self promotion on this site, including links to blogs. Please see the club guidelines for clarification. Thank you.


message 183: by Bentley, Group Founder, Leader, Chief (new)

Bentley | 25177 comments Lobbyists obviously and you are right.


message 182: by Mark (new)

Mark Mortensen I do not believe so. Basically the bananas I noticed in St. Lucia were grown as very organic.

I’m all for capitalism, however United Fruit was a classic case of corrupt capitalism at its worst and should not be accepted by anyone.


message 181: by Bentley, Group Founder, Leader, Chief (new)

Bentley | 25177 comments Lovely post Mark and really disappointing about the bananas. Did this have anything to do with health standards or other safety regulations - if not that is a sad commentary.


message 180: by Mark (new)

Mark Mortensen Marren wrote: "St.Lucia, West Indies."

Reference is made to your posts on St. Lucia and the History Club thread game of cricket. Some years ago I noticed promotional signs noting that China and Taiwan are both funding island infrastructure projects including some athletic fields.

St. Lucia certainly is a beautiful country with very friendly people and a unique history. I’ve vacationed twice for a couple of weeks each time around Cap Point on the northern tip most recently back in the late 1990’s.

For many decades control of the island flipped back and forth from French to British. As I toured Fort Rodney on Pigeon Island I was thinking about the 1782 famous naval “Battle of the Saints” thinking if I were in the British military at the time I’d rather be spending my days winning the battle in St. Lucia than fighting the losing American Revolutionary War. I enjoyed your Independence Day festivities and my observation was that the island has one official naval vessel.

I became very educated when I bought island bananas for the first time from a few wandering fellows, while driving down an open stretch of road between plantations. The islanders were very gracious to Americans; however there was one very legitimate complaint. Apparently St. Lucia was blocked from selling bananas and other produce to the U.S. because they were not commercialized and affiliated with the big companies of Chiquita and Dole. The island did not wish to become corrupt or turn to drug trade, but simply wished for fair simple trade. I look forward to reading “Bananas: How the United Fruit Company Shaped the World” and someday finding bananas from St. Lucia in my American grocery store.

I have fond memories of the Great House, which I list as the most beautiful and relaxing restaurant I’ve ever experienced. My wife and sons liked to barter with the women in the Castries market. With thoughts of Piton’s and Baron hot sauce I wish peace, happiness and days filled with relaxed reading to all the islanders!

Bananas!  How The United Fruit Company Shaped the World by Peter ChapmanPeter Chapman


message 179: by Bryan, Assisting Moderator - Presidential Series (new)

Bryan Craig | 10934 comments David wrote: "I am a new member of the group and just discovered this thread. I am from Chicago and have lived here my whole life but do travel extensively for pleasure, not business. I am fascinated by the hi..."

Chicago is a great town and rich history. I'm fascinated by the stock yards.

I have Miller's book in my library and it looks great.

When you mention a book, don't forget to cite it properly:

City of the Century  The Epic of Chicago and the Making of America by Donald L. Miller Donald L. MillerDonald L. Miller


David Eppenstein I am a new member of the group and just discovered this thread. I am from Chicago and have lived here my whole life but do travel extensively for pleasure, not business. I am fascinated by the history of my city and recommend Donald Miller's "City of the Century" as well as several others on my read list. To say that Chicago history os colorful is an understatement of extreme proportions. Chicago is not only unique among American cities but also cities of the world. It is the fastest growing city in history having reached the million residents mark in less than 50 years while all other major cities took centuries to reach that milestone. Our history is full of heroes, scoundrels, charlatans, thugs, saints, hookers, gangsters, and martyrs. If you can't find what you're looking for in Chicago's history then you're reading the history of some other city.


message 177: by sarg (new)

sarg (sargkc) | 20 comments I Live in Texas a part where the west begins. History is all around me and easy to see and visit. My wife and I on different occasoions take what we call day trips and go to different places around Weatherford, Texas to visit places of history. I will tell all about some of them from time to time. All can go to my Flicker site http://www.flickr.com/photos/sargkc/ and check out my Sets under "neat Day trips"
Just about 15 miles West of Weatherford, Texas on interstate twenty is a ghost town Called Thurber Texas.
Thurber Texas Ghost town
Thurber (located midway between Fort Worth and Abilene on Interstate 20) was a company owned town, founded and controlled from around 1888 through the 1930's by Texas and Pacific Coal Co. (after 1933, Texas Pacific Oil Company). At its height, it was the largest town between Fort Worth and El Paso. Every building and inch of ground was owned 100% by Texas and Pacific Coal Co. Every resident lived in a company house, shopped at company stores, drank at the company saloon, attended a company school, danced at the company opera house, and worshiped in company churches.
Historical Marker Thurber Texas
The local Cometary shows the various nationalities that where working here:
Thurber Texas Ghost Town Cemetary

this company evolved into the Texco oil co


message 176: by Bryan, Assisting Moderator - Presidential Series (new)

Bryan Craig | 10934 comments Great, thanks Krystal


Krystal (queenravenclaw) | 331 comments Well here goes nothing I live in the warmest place in Ontario. We haven't gotten much snow in the past couple years so when we got a snow storm boxing day the kids were overjoyed and the adults were not liking it. We have a rich history here in the city with Walkerville Manor and my fave park that is only 5 mins away from my house. Were located on the Detroit River and I'm trying to find prove of what my grade school teachers use to tell us that my street use to be a river but my aunt denies it. The young adults have a slang for our city core we call it DT(Downtown on FB and such)It where all the night clubs are and the casino. We have an underground railroad monument and we can thank Chief Tecumesh for his role in the War Of 1812 as well as Gen.Brock.


http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Windsor,...

below is a brief history of the different parks in the city

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Parks_in...

We have a very rich history we had settlerrs from all over Europe. We have a Little Italy, Polish village,among others.I live in the Polish village but I am Croatian.


message 174: by Bryan, Assisting Moderator - Presidential Series (new)

Bryan Craig | 10934 comments Wow, Mansoor, it must have been something to meet the author.

Don't forget to cite the book and author again:

Three Cups of Tea  One Man's Mission to Promote Peace ... One School at a Time by Greg Mortenson Greg MortensonGreg Mortenson


Mansoor Azam (azam69) | 21 comments @Becky

Met the author of three cups of tea at Skardu air port in Northern Areas a few years back. The book was recently out then and he gave a crate full to my aunt (who was a professor there) for distribution. great work greg Mortenson is doing


Becky (httpsbeckylindrooswordpresscom) | 1219 comments Thank you so much Mansoor - All these little photo clips from various places really help me to visualize the settings of books I read. Like northern mountains of Pakistan is the setting for The Far Pavilions - an older book but very good. Three Cups of Tea is also set there. In fact, several of my favorite historical novels are set, at least in part, in Pakistan.

The Far Pavilions by M.M. Kaye M.M. KayeM.M. Kaye

Three Cups of Tea  One Man's Mission to Promote Peace ... One School at a Time by Greg Mortenson Greg MortensonGreg Mortenson


message 171: by Mark (new)

Mark Mortensen Yes, thanks Mansoor for all the wonderful photos and insight.


André (AndrH) | 2375 comments Thank you, Mansoor. I'm sure many will take a look at the links you provided.


Mansoor Azam (azam69) | 21 comments and another site from someone's flikr collection

http://www.flickr.com/photos/35663537...


Mansoor Azam (azam69) | 21 comments Pakistan is the land i belong to and live in. Sadly, it comes in the news these days for all the wrong reasons due to ongoing War on Terrorism that this beautiful land is gripped in. But a blessed and beautiful country this one. I found out this site that shall give the real picture of my country to anyone who's interested in knowing it . Feast your eyes to the real Pakistan

http://thepeopleofpakistan.wordpress....


message 167: by sarg (new)

sarg (sargkc) | 20 comments Being from Texas there are thousand of historical locations around me. I enjoy History as it was my favorite subj in school, My wife and I make one day journeys to interesting and historical places that we call "DAY TRIPS" go to my Flicker site and under "neat day trips you can see some of them
http://www.flickr.com/photos/sargkc/


message 166: by Bentley, Group Founder, Leader, Chief (new)

Bentley | 25177 comments Hell Sue Ann, this thread is for telling us the history of where you live and some interesting tidbits about that location - since you live in Cincinnati you could tell us a bit about that city and any historical facts and maybe add some photos.


message 165: by André (last edited Jul 29, 2012 03:24AM) (new)

André (AndrH) | 2375 comments Sue Ann wrote: "Very interesting post by Becky. How did this thread start and where is it going?"

Sue Ann, how it all started you can see by checking the first post. It's off topic and meant to be fun.
As to where it's going, I'd say wherever you'd want to take it. Just tell us something about where you live.


Sue Ann Painter (sueannpainter) | 3 comments Very interesting post by Becky. How did this thread start and where is it going?


Becky (httpsbeckylindrooswordpresscom) | 1219 comments Thank you, Bentley.


message 162: by Bentley, Group Founder, Leader, Chief (new)

Bentley | 25177 comments What a great job Becky. Terrific.


Becky (httpsbeckylindrooswordpresscom) | 1219 comments Thanks Jill - it's not a big or famous town but I like it.


message 160: by Jill, Assisting Moderator - Global NF, HF, European/Brit. Hist/Music (new)

Jill Hutchinson (Bucs1960) | 7614 comments Great information, Becky!!!!


Becky (httpsbeckylindrooswordpresscom) | 1219 comments Thank you, Mark and Mansoor - a labor of love when it's your own place.


message 158: by Mark (new)

Mark Mortensen Becky wrote: "That's it - that's my town - sorry for going on and on ..."

Thanks Becky for the insight and history! California is an amazing and beautiful state.


Mansoor Azam (azam69) | 21 comments André wrote: "Mansoor wrote: "Pakistan is a lovely land to visit..."

Hi Mansoor, if you want to tell us more about it, this is the right place...."


now that becky has shown the way i shall come in detail in a few days :)


Becky (httpsbeckylindrooswordpresscom) | 1219 comments Thank you Andre and Zeljika. I hadn't ever really thought of it as a whole before - only in pieces. This was interesting for me to do.


Zeljka (ZTook) | 83 comments Becky wrote: "I live in the little city of Porterville in Tulare County, California - home of the giant redwoods (about 3 miles away as the crow flies)..I've lived here, about 50 miles north of Bakersfield and up against the Sierra Nevadas, for almost 50 years (with about 5 years off for college and Texas) so I'm kind of familiar with the place..."

Wow what an amazing story of your home! Thank you for sharing!


message 154: by André (last edited Jul 03, 2012 11:21PM) (new)

André (AndrH) | 2375 comments Becky wrote: "That's it - that's my town - sorry for going on and on ..."

Becky - thanks for going on and on and on!!!!
Terrific!
I think that's what's history is all about; all people, all their stories, some maybe more fascinating than others but nevertheless all stories that deserve to be told.
Happy 4th of July!


message 153: by Becky (last edited Jul 08, 2012 12:39PM) (new)

Becky (httpsbeckylindrooswordpresscom) | 1219 comments I've read all the messages up to this point and can honestly say, WOW! I've actually been to Croatia (extraordinarily lovely) and England (but only a bit there) and some other places, but never Australia or Netherlands or Pakistan, thank you. I really do want to visit even more now!

So reading all those interesting messages I went and got carried away with my own - sorry - but there really is a lot of varied national-type history here for such a remote little area. And I don't think it's in any one place on the net - so I just devised my own accumulation of items and added photos and books and sites if you're interested.

I live in the little city of Porterville in Tulare County, California - home of the giant redwoods (about 3 miles away as the crow flies)

Giant Redwoods in Sequoia National Park

I've lived here, about 50 miles north of Bakersfield and up against the Sierra Nevadas, for almost 50 years (with about 5 years off for college and Texas) so I'm kind of familiar with the place. We are mostly agricultural, rural, remote. We grow navel oranges and olives and walnuts and all sorts of things, cotton, citrus, beef, etc.


orange crate label

I've put this narrative in chronological order focusing on those items which might be of interest on a national level. It's kind of amazing how much the national history and our local history were intertwined (maybe it shouldn't be that amazing):

****
This area is the historical home of the southern group of Yokut Indians (Koyeti and Yandanchi tribes) who were pretty well decimated during the local Indian wars (Tule Indian War) following the California Gold Rush.
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Yoku


Indian Encampment in Yosemite Valley


Yokut by Barbara A. Gray-Kanatiiosh by Barbara A. Gray-Kanatiiosh

****

After the advent of the 1849 Gold Rush the Tule River Stage located a stopover where Porterville would develop. This was in about 1854. Miners came and then settlers - no gold was ever found in or along the Tule River, but other minerals were.

In about 1856 there came the inevitable troubles with the natives which ended very tragically for them. It started out with the theft of a cow and ended with broken treaties and many dead and displaced.
http://www.musketoon.com/2012/02/21/t...

As a result of all this, a reservation was originally established in 1857 and Indians from a widespread area were brought here. The location became desirable however (it's a school grounds today) so twenty years later the Tule River Indian Reservation was relocated to its present location. The children there attend Porterville schools - after a 45 minute mountain bus ride.
http://www.tulerivertribe-nsn.gov/his...


Tule Indians 1930?


****

In the fall of 1858 the Butterfield Overland Stage Line established a rest stop at Goodhue’s Crossing near the Tule River, a site that would eventually become known as the City of Porterville. “That stage stop – the Tule River Station – is what started the town,” explains local historian Bill Horst. The Butterfield Overland Stage was for folks and mail going between Tennessee or St. Louis and San Francisco. This was part of the southern route to the Gold Fields and it replaced the route going around through the Panama Canal.
http://www.ci.porterville.ca.us/govt/...

This was the route:

[image error]
http://www.militarymuseum.org/CpBabbi...

California was supposedly a "free state" but it wasn't that simple because many who took this southern route were from the Southern states. An excellent book on this subject is The California Gold Rush and the Coming of the Civil War by Leonard. L. Richards.

The California Gold Rush and the Coming of the Civil War by Leonard L. RichardsLeonard L. Richards

****

In 1888 the Southern Pacific Railway came in helping both agriculture and mining (as well as themselves). There were disputes between the railroad and local farmers about land titles (greed and misunderstanding) and the Mussel SloughTragedy was one result. (The railroad evictors killed about 6 settlers and injured another 6.) This occurred about 50 miles away. All courts (including the Supreme) found everything in favor of the railroads.
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Mussel_S...

A whole legend grew up around the event (which was already big enough) and it was about 75 years before Terry Beers, the author of Gunfight at Mussel Slough: Evolution of a Western Myth straightened it out (for now).

Gunfight at Mussel Slough  Five Versions of a Western Myth by Terry BeersTerry Beers (no author photo)

These events were also immortalized in Frank Norris' classic fictionalization, The Octopus (1901).

The Octopus  A Story of California by Frank Norris Frank NorrisFrank Norris

****

In 1908 the African-American community of Allensworth was founded about 15 miles west of Porterville by Lt. Colonel Allen Allensworth who had relocated to Los Angeles. Allensworth was a veteran of the US Civil War, the Spanish American War and the Mexican War, He and his associates "sought to build a town where African Americans could own property, learn, and live the American Dream." Unfortunately, although it got off to a great start, within about 4 years the water was found to be very bad due to the declining water table and the high alkaline levels. The founders started leaving and the community declined until the 1950s when arsenic was found in the water. The remaining farmers were bought out by the state and the community was converted to a State Park.
Basically from
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Colonel_...




And lots more info at:
http://www.historynet.com/allensworth...

And YouTube videos:
http://www.youtube.com/user/ColonelAl...
(check out Land of Promise and Russ Christoff)

Or Alice Royal's The Freedom Colony: A California African Amerian Township:
Allensworth, the Freedom Colony  A California African American Township by Alice C. RoyalAlice C. Royal

****

In the 1930s destitute immigrants from Oklahoma took Route 66 ...


Route 66

... to get to the orchards of the Central Valley and jobs. The feelings about that were very divisive. There were plenty of labor camps still operating when I moved here in 1964. Grapes of Wrath pretty well tells the story of how many of our current residents arrived - these were the parents of many of my high school classmates. Grapes of Wrath was banned in the Bakersfield schools for many years - probably in Porterville's, too. Today those children of "okies" are local, and state leaders, as well as being important figures in entertainment, education sports and the arts. Grapes of Wrath was the Bakersfield "Community Read" a few years ago.

The Grapes of Wrath by John Steinbeck John SteinbeckJohn Steinbeck

Some of my friends' parents were Okies who cooked Southern style, others were Yokut, with fry-bread, or local ranchers with barbecue, and then there were migrant workers, with chicken adobo or enchiladas as well as Asian with pretty vegetables. We've got great food here! (smile!)

***
In 1941 the U.S. Army temporarily assumed control of the Tulare County Fairgrounds, converting it to the Tulare Assembly Center, a temporary detention center for Japanese Americans. The Assembly Center was administered by the Wartime Civil Control Administration, under the Western Defense Command and the U.S. 4th Army. The first inmate was received on April 27, 1942, and the last inmate departed on September 4, 1942. The top population numbered 4978 citizens. In the latter part of 1942, internees began being moved to the ten more permanent internment prisons. The majority of internees from the Tulare Assembly Center were sent to the Gila River War Relocation Center in Arizona. The temporary sites were largely located on fairgrounds or race tracks in completely public and visible locations. [8]
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Tulare,_...

http://www.stoppingpoints.com/califor...


***
In the 1960s two national events affected us - Porterville had huge losses and was seriously polarized by the War in Vietnam. We lost 28 men out of a population of 12,000 people. That was said to be 6 times the national average - it's believed that no American town had more young men killed per capita. This information was in the San Francisco Chronicle and other places.
http://wn.com/Porterville_Vietnam_Mem... (video 3)


Porterville Vietnam War Memorial

The other thing was the Delano farmworkers strike which pitted farm labor, organized as the United Farm Workers, against the ranchers and orchard owners. Cesar Chavez visited and there were pickets just out of town, but the local newspaper printed none of it. (Fresno did.) The workers were mainly Mexican and Filipino. The college paper (I was editor) ran stories with photos because, as I told the Dean, "If our students are involved, it's our business." (He didn't mind - he just wanted to be prepared for the "fallout.")

Cesar Chavez day is still celebrated here (March 30).


UFW pickets outside Porterville- 1973

****
As far as I know nothing of any national import has happened here since. There is the usual round of weather issues (113º F. last week) and California's tax problems, but for the most part it's been relatively peaceful and growing fast for the last 40 or so years. :-)

That's it - that's my town - sorry for going on and on ...


message 152: by André (last edited Jul 02, 2012 11:35PM) (new)

André (AndrH) | 2375 comments Mansoor wrote: "Pakistan is a lovely land to visit..."

Hi Mansoor, if you want to tell us more about it, this is the right place....


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