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ANCIENT HISTORY > THE OTTOMAN EMPIRE

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message 1: by Bentley, Group Founder, Leader, Chief (new)

Bentley | 31634 comments Mod
This is a thread about the Ottoman Empire.


message 2: by Bentley, Group Founder, Leader, Chief (new)

Bentley | 31634 comments Mod
Here is a video about Powerful Women of the Ottoman Empire.

http://edition.cnn.com/video/#/video/...

Source: CNN


message 3: by Jill, Assisting Moderator - Military Hist L/Global NF/Eur/Brit/Music (last edited Jun 22, 2013 06:31PM) (new)

Jill Hutchinson (Bucs1960) | 11491 comments Mod
The Ottoman Empire, 1700-1922 (New Approaches to European History) by Donald Quataert by Donald Quataert (no photo)

Description
This major new survey of the Ottoman Empire, 1700-1922, strikes a balance among social, economic, and political history. The book examines the major trends during the latter years of the empire; it pays attention to gender issues and to hotly-debated topics such as the treatment of minorities. Donald Quataert, a distinguished Ottoman scholar, has written a lively, authoritative and accessible introduction, supported by maps, illustrations and a chronology, which will be of enormous value to students and nonspecialists alike.


message 4: by Bentley, Group Founder, Leader, Chief (new)

Bentley | 31634 comments Mod
Thank you for the add Jill.


message 5: by 'Aussie Rick' (new)

'Aussie Rick' (AussieRick) Another decent book but one that takes a different approach that covers the history of the Ottoman Empire is; "Lords of the Horizons: History of the Ottoman Empire" by Jason Goodwin.

Lords of the Horizons A History of the Ottoman Empire by Jason Goodwin by Jason GoodwinJason Goodwin
Description:
This is an evocation of the power of the Ottoman Empire, which swelled and declined over a period of six centuries, rising from a dusty fiefdom in the foothills of Anatolia to a power which ruled on the Danube and the Euphrates. The royal line bent, but never broke, from Osman, born in a desert tent around 1280, to Abdul Mecid, who died in a Paris flat in 1942. For 300 years the Empire held sway amid murmurs of imminent collapse. At its height Istanbul had the wealthiest court in Europe, whose aid was sought by Indian princes and French kings. Its religion was Islamic (but its subjects largely not), its ceremony Byzantine, its dignity Persian, its wealth Egyptian, its alphabet Arabic, its aesthetic Dalmatian, its cruelty and gallantry all its own - and excessive. The decline was prodigious, protracted, and total: after World War I the Ottoman Empire was no more. The book charts its history from the first campaigns to the Charge of the Light Brigade, from the Crusades to the Dardanelles, and aims to bring to life details of Ottoman life: caravans carrying parcels of spice and bags of gold, Western emissaries witnessing executions, distant sentries on far frontiers, jewels, meals, shadow plays and stray dogs.

The book that most readers refer to in regards to Ottoman history is:

The Ottoman Centuries by John Patrick Douglas Balfour by John Patrick Douglas Balfour


message 6: by Jill, Assisting Moderator - Military Hist L/Global NF/Eur/Brit/Music (new)

Jill Hutchinson (Bucs1960) | 11491 comments Mod
That look good, AR and I think I will look for that one......the "sick man of Europe" certainly lasted longer that most expected.

Lords of the Horizons A History of the Ottoman Empire by Jason Goodwin Jason GoodwinJason Goodwin


message 7: by Zeljka (new)

Zeljka (ZTook) | 83 comments If you haven't already read, I suggest beautiful novel
My Name Is Red by Orhan Pamuk by Orhan Pamuk (it actually doesn't cover a history itself, but Arabic art and culture).
Following authors have written splendid historical fiction set in Ottoman Empire:
Ivo Andrić
Meša Selimović


message 8: by 'Aussie Rick' (new)

'Aussie Rick' (AussieRick) Hi Jill, I hope you like it if you decided to read it but be mindful its not your standard chronological history but chapters made up of different aspects of the Ottoman empire and its history but by all accounts an enjoyable read if you know what you are getting into :)


message 9: by Jill, Assisting Moderator - Military Hist L/Global NF/Eur/Brit/Music (new)

Jill Hutchinson (Bucs1960) | 11491 comments Mod
Glad to see you jumping right into the discussion, Zeljka and thanks for the recommendations. Don't forget to add a link and photo if available when mentioning a book/author. Looks like this:

My Name Is Red by Orhan Pamuk by Orhan PamukOrhan Pamuk


message 10: by 'Aussie Rick' (new)

'Aussie Rick' (AussieRick) Zeljka wrote: "If you haven't already read, I suggest beautiful novel
My Name Is Red by Orhan Pamuk by Orhan Pamuk (it actually doesn't cover a history itself, but Arabic art and culture).
Following authors hav..."


Hi Zeljka, thanks for the information on that book, I am sure many will enjoy checking it out.


message 11: by Jill, Assisting Moderator - Military Hist L/Global NF/Eur/Brit/Music (last edited Oct 06, 2011 02:10PM) (new)

Jill Hutchinson (Bucs1960) | 11491 comments Mod
'Aussie Rick' wrote: "Hi Jill, I hope you like it if you decided to read it but be mindful its not your standard chronological history but chapters made up of different aspects of the Ottoman empire and its history but ..."

That's why it sounds so interesting.....let's hope it is>


message 12: by Daniel (new)

Daniel Domenech | 14 comments I really don't consider this an ancient empire, more a modern empire in chronological terms.


message 13: by Jill, Assisting Moderator - Military Hist L/Global NF/Eur/Brit/Music (new)

Jill Hutchinson (Bucs1960) | 11491 comments Mod
The Ottoman Dynasty is the one and only dynasty to incessantly rule over an empire for more than six centuries. The sultans who "guested" on the throne ruled a vast transcontinental empire that was at the center of interactions between the Eastern and Western worlds. This book gives us a look at these rulers, how they ruled, the battles they fought, and their personal lives.

Mighty Guests of the Throne The Ottoman Sultans by Salih Gulen by Salih Gulen(no photo)


message 14: by Joel (last edited Oct 29, 2011 11:21AM) (new)

Joel Trono-Doerksen for anyone interested in Ottoman social culture this is a really good book :

Subjects of the Sultan Culture and Daily Life in the Ottoman Empire by Suraiya Faroqhi by Suraiya Faroqhi

another good book about the private lives of the Ottoman sultan is this one:

Inside the Seraglio Private Lives of the Sultans in Istanbul by John Freely by: John Freely


message 15: by Jill, Assisting Moderator - Military Hist L/Global NF/Eur/Brit/Music (new)

Jill Hutchinson (Bucs1960) | 11491 comments Mod
Those books really look like something I may want to read, Joel.
Don't forget to add the author link
Inside the Seraglio Private Lives of the Sultans in Istanbul by John Freely by John FreelyJohn Freely


message 16: by 'Aussie Rick' (last edited Oct 29, 2011 02:56PM) (new)

'Aussie Rick' (AussieRick) Here are some older books covering different aspects of the Ottoman Empire, the city and the Sultan:

Constantinople City of the World's Desire, 1453-1924 by Philip Mansel by Philip Mansel
Description:
Philip Mansel's highly acclaimed history absorbingly charts the interaction between the vibrantly cosmopolitan capital of Constantinople - the city of the world's desire - and its ruling family.

In 1453, Mehmed the Conqueror entered Constantinople on a white horse, beginning an Ottoman love affair with the city that lasted until 1924, when the last Caliph hurriedly left on the Orient Express. For almost five centuries Constantinople, with its enormous racial and cultural diversity, was the centre of the dramatic and often depraved story of an extraordinary dynasty.

Reviews:
"An endless treasure chest of fascinating facts and extraordinary revelations ... a cultural and social history as much as a political and military one, Mansel's outstandingly researched portrait of this intriguing imperial city and its exotic denizens is gripping." - Robert Carver, (Scotsman)

"The victory, the defeat, the magnificence, the squalor, the cruelty and the tolerance of the Ottoman years are all recorded there, Constantinople is one of those cities to which I always long to return, and the longing grows on every page." - Noel Malcolm, (Sunday Telegraph)

"Marvellous ... the experience of the whole city grows with the book ... you always feel close to the beat of Constantinople's raffish and mysterious heart." - Michael Ratcliffe, (Observer)

"A happy blend of shcolarship and panache ... If you have visited Constantinople, read it: if not, buy it before you go." - Lawrence James, (Evening Standard)

"Plenty of intrigue and bloodshed. The squeamish should skip the city's solution to the stray dog problem... and focus on the convincingly documented and colourful ebb and flow of economy and society." - Charmaine Chan, (South China Morning Post)



Suleiman the Magnificent, scourge of Heaven by Antony Bridge by Antony Bridge
Description:
The dramatic story of islam's counter-crusade against western Christendom, written with vivid narrative power by the author of The Crusades.

Suleiman the Magnificent, Sultan of the Ottoman Turks, was one of the most powerful figures in the 16th-century world. This vastly enjoyable account of his impact on Christian Europe from 1520 to the 1560s shows him battering the gates of Vienna, engaged in running battles with the Hungarians and the Knights of St John and in constant conflict with the navies of the Mediterranean powers.

Suleiman the Magnificent - Sultan of the East by Harold Lamb by Harold LambHarold Lamb


message 17: by Benjamin (new)

Benjamin Buchholz | 8 comments Taking a graduate survey of Near Eastern scholarship at Princeton and we're reading:

Arabs and Young Turks Ottomanism, Arabism, and Islamism in the Ottoman Empire, 1908-1918 by Hasan Kayali
Hasan Kayali

and

The Origins of Arab Nationalism by Rashid Khalidi
Rashid Khalidi

and

The Development of Secularism in Turkey by Niyazi BerkesNiyazi Berkes

and

The Long Peace Ottoman Lebanon, 1861-1920 by Engin AkarliEngin Akarli

Of the insights gained from this course of reading, perhaps the most worthwhile has been to understand that while Ottoman history has been studied and Arab Nationalism has also been amply studied, there has been very little attention paid to how the Ottoman Empire actually shaped Arab Nationalism (and, therefore, the cleptocracies throughout the region that are now, finally, falling apart). For instance, as the Ottomans selectively westernized, they sent a large corps of officers for schooling in the west, introducing to both Turks (Young Ottomans/Young Turks) and Arabs both the liberalizing and the nationalizing trends within western military thought at the time.


message 18: by Bentley, Group Founder, Leader, Chief (new)

Bentley | 31634 comments Mod
Interesting maybe that is why the Turks today seem to be more advanced. Also, thank you for your comment and your adds.

I also noticed that you did the citations as they should be on this site and that the author's photos were not available (good job, thank you).


message 19: by Bentley, Group Founder, Leader, Chief (new)

Bentley | 31634 comments Mod
We do not allow any self promotion Miltiades and there is a pop window which tells you that before you even post the first time. We do not give any other warnings.


message 20: by Kathy (new)

Kathy (Kathy_H) | 2771 comments From the Metropolitan Museum of Art: The Art of the Ottomans before 1600

http://www.metmuseum.org/toah/hd/otto...

At the time of its foundation in the early fourteenth century, the Osmanli or Ottoman state was one among many small principalities that emerged as a result of the disintegration of the Seljuq sultanate in Anatolia and subsequent instability caused by Mongol rule. This embryonic Ottoman state, located on the frontiers of the Islamic world, gradually absorbed former Byzantine territories in Anatolia and the Balkans. In 1453, this expansion culminated in the Ottoman capture of Constantinople, the great capital of Eastern Christendom. With the conquest of the Mamluk empire in 1517, the Ottomans ruled over the most powerful state in the Islamic world. By the middle of the sixteenth century, continued military success in an area extending from Central Europe to the Indian Ocean gave the Ottomans the status of a world power.


message 21: by Kathy (last edited May 16, 2013 02:13PM) (new)

Kathy (Kathy_H) | 2771 comments Khusrau Hunting: Page from a manuscript of the Khusrau and Shirin of Hatifi





dated 1498; Ottoman
Turkey (probably Istanbul)
Ink, colors, and gold on paper


The Persian poet Hatifi (died 1521), nephew of the fifteenth-century Herat poet Jami, wrote a Khamsa (Quintet), like other ambitious poets, in emulation of the great Nizami. Persian literature and culture were much admired at the Ottoman court, and Persian was considered the prime language for poetry. This manuscript of Khusrau and Shirin, one of the books of the Khamsa, was transcribed in Persian during the author's lifetime.

This painting, one of seven in the manuscript, shows the Iranian prince Khusrau hunting with his companions. Ottoman painting during the reign of Bayezid II (r. 1481–1512), who was a great patron of the arts, was still in a formative state, with influences coming from both East and West. In this case, the style derives basically from the Turkman style of southern Iran, as seen in such conventions as the organization of spatial planes and the distinctive rendition of vegetation in the first two phases. But the liveliness of the figures and variety of flying birds hint at the interest in realism that would become a hallmark of Turkish painting in the sixteenth century.

(Source: http://www.metmuseum.org/toah/works-o...)


message 22: by Kathy (last edited Jun 25, 2013 10:58AM) (new)

Kathy (Kathy_H) | 2771 comments Historical Dictionary of the Ottoman Empire

Historical Dictionary of the Ottoman Empire by Selçuk Akşin Somel by Selçuk Akşin SomelSelçuk Akşin Somel

Synopsis:

The Ottoman Empire was the last great Muslim political entity, emerging in the later Middle Ages and continuing its existence until the early 20th century and the creation of the modern state of Turkey.

Here you will find an in-depth treatise covering the political social, and economic history of the Ottoman Empire, the last member of the lineage of the Near Eastern and Mediterranean empires and the only one that reached the modern times both in terms of internal structure and world history.

Key Features:
o Historical maps
o A detailed chronology
o A list of Ottoman sultans and grand viziers
o A dictionary consisting of 781 entries
o An analytical bibliography
o Details where original Turkish documents can be located


message 23: by Jerome (new)

Jerome | 3488 comments Osman's Dream: The History of the Ottoman Empire

Osman's Dream The History of the Ottoman Empire by Caroline Finkel by Caroline Finkel

Synopsis

According to the Ottoman chronicles, the first sultan, Osman, had a dream in which a tree emerged fully formed from his navel "and its shade compassed the world"-symbolizing the vast empire he and his descendants were destined to forge. His vision was soon realized: At its height, the Ottoman realm extended from Hungary to the Persian Gulf, from North Africa to the Caucasus. The Ottoman Empire was one of the largest and most influential empires in world history. For centuries, Europe watched with fear as the Ottomans steadily advanced their rule across the Balkans. Yet travelers and merchants were irresistibly drawn toward Ottoman lands by their fascination with the Orient and the lure of profit. Although it survived for over six centuries, the history of the Ottoman Empire is too often colored by the memory of its bloody final throes. In this magisterial work Caroline Finkel lucidly recounts the epic story of the Ottoman Empire from its origins in the thirteenth century through its destruction on the battlefields of World War I.


message 24: by Jill, Assisting Moderator - Military Hist L/Global NF/Eur/Brit/Music (new)

Jill Hutchinson (Bucs1960) | 11491 comments Mod
The Ottoman Crimean War

The Ottoman Crimean War (1853-1856) (Ottoman Empire and Its Heritage) by Candan Badem by Candan Badem

Synopsis

When we think of the Crimean War, we usually think of England, France, and Russia as the major combatants. But of course the Ottoman Empire (Turkey) was also in the war and this book is written from the Turkish point of view. It gives the reader a look at a governmental system which is unfamiliar to Westerners and it very well documented. Be warned.....it is 400+ pages, so it is not the casual week-end read.


message 25: by 'Aussie Rick' (new)

'Aussie Rick' (AussieRick) Looks like an excellent book Jill - I wish you hadn't posted the details as I think I will have to look for a copy :)


message 26: by Jill, Assisting Moderator - Military Hist L/Global NF/Eur/Brit/Music (new)

Jill Hutchinson (Bucs1960) | 11491 comments Mod
Am I surprised.......no!!!!!!


message 27: by 'Aussie Rick' (new)

'Aussie Rick' (AussieRick) It's bloody expensive - I might have to start saving up my pocket money :)


message 28: by Jill, Assisting Moderator - Military Hist L/Global NF/Eur/Brit/Music (new)

Jill Hutchinson (Bucs1960) | 11491 comments Mod
I'm still looking for "Fisher's Face" so I know about expensive!!! This one, written by a professor, is pretty scholarly and gets right into the minds of those attempting to hold the Ottoman Empire together.

Fisher's Face by Jan Morris by Jan MorrisJan Morris

The Ottoman Crimean War (1853-1856) (Ottoman Empire and Its Heritage) by Candan Badem by Candan Badem


message 29: by Kathy (new)

Kathy (Kathy_H) | 2771 comments Thanks for all the adds. It seems that if I find one book that looks interesting to me, I end up with a dozen that I want to read.


message 30: by Kathy (last edited Jun 25, 2013 10:58AM) (new)

Kathy (Kathy_H) | 2771 comments A Classic Persian Story. Fiction.
Layla and Majnun

Layla and Majnun The Classic Love Story of Persian Literature by نظامی گنجوی by نظامی گنجوینظامی گنجوی

Synopsis:

The text is a prose rendition of Nizami's 12th-century poetic masterpiece, in which he reshapes the legends of Majnun, the quintessential romantic fool, into a tale of the ideal lover. For the Sufis, Majnun represents the perfect devotee of the "religion of the heart," and the story is an allegory of the soul's longing for God. This is a beautiful production, and it includes a final chapter newly translated from the Persian by Omid Safi and Zia Inayat Khan.


message 31: by Kathy (last edited May 30, 2013 08:55AM) (new)

Kathy (Kathy_H) | 2771 comments A minature of Nizami's work. Layla and Majnun meet for the last time before their deaths. Both have fainted and Majnun's elderly messenger attempts to revive Layla while wild animals protect the pair from unwelcome intruders.


Late 16th Century Illustration


message 32: by Jill, Assisting Moderator - Military Hist L/Global NF/Eur/Brit/Music (new)

Jill Hutchinson (Bucs1960) | 11491 comments Mod
This book describes the eventual dissolution of the Ottoman Empire as a result of WWI. It is a scholarly look at the emergence of the modern Middle East from its Ottoman roots.

A Peace to End All Peace The Fall of the Ottoman Empire and the Creation of the Modern Middle East by David Fromkin by David Fromkin(no photo)

Synopsis

The critically acclaimed New York Times bestselling account of how the modern Middle East came into being after World War I, and why it is in upheaval today

In our time the Middle East has proven a battleground of rival religions, ideologies, nationalisms, and dynasties. All of these conflicts, including the hostilities between Arabs and Israelis that have flared yet again, come down, in a sense, to the extent to which the Middle East will continue to live with its political inheritance: the arrangements, unities, and divisions imposed upon the region by the Allies after the First World War.

In A Peace to End All Peace, David Fromkin reveals how and why the Allies came to remake the geography and politics of the Middle East, drawing lines on an empty map that eventually became the new countries of Iraq, Israel, Jordan, and Lebanon. Focusing on the formative years of 1914 to 1922, when all-even an alliance between Arab nationalism and Zionism-seemed possible he raises questions about what might have been done differently, and answers questions about why things were done as they were. The current battle for a Palestinian homeland has its roots in these events of 85 years ago.


message 33: by Kathy (new)

Kathy (Kathy_H) | 2771 comments Thanks, Jill; I've been looking at that one wondering how to fit it into my reading schedule. Now you've tempted me to move it up in the list.

A Peace to End All Peace The Fall of the Ottoman Empire and the Creation of the Modern Middle East by David Fromkin by David Fromkin (no photo)


message 34: by Jill, Assisting Moderator - Military Hist L/Global NF/Eur/Brit/Music (new)

Jill Hutchinson (Bucs1960) | 11491 comments Mod
Doesn't that always happen? Just when I'm ready to start a book, somebody posts something that I really want to read and my plans go awry!!!!

I like this book because it offers some insight into how the victors of WWI just carved up the middle east on a blank map and how they might have done it differently. Its not alternative history, just a good scholarly study of what happened and how it might have been avoided.


message 35: by Kathy (last edited Jun 25, 2013 10:58AM) (new)

Kathy (Kathy_H) | 2771 comments The Ottoman Empire: The Classical Age 1300-1600

The Ottoman Empire The Classical Age 1300-1600 by Halil İnalcık by Halil İnalcıkHalil İnalcık

Synopsis:

A preeminent scholar of Turkish history vividly portrays 300 years of this distinctively Eastern culture as it grew from a military principality to the world's most powerful Islamic state. He paints a striking picture of the prominence of religion and warfare in everyday life, as well as the traditions of statecraft, administration, social values, financial, and land policies. "...masterly...Halil Inalcik is one of the foremost living students of Ottoman history...Read this book..."--Times Literary Supplement.


message 36: by Kathy (last edited Jun 25, 2013 10:58AM) (new)

Kathy (Kathy_H) | 2771 comments Osman's Dream: The History of the Ottoman Empire

Osman's Dream The History of the Ottoman Empire by Caroline Finkel by Caroline Finkel (no photo)

Synopsis:

According to the Ottoman chronicles, the first sultan, Osman, had a dream in which a tree emerged fully formed from his navel "and its shade compassed the world"-symbolizing the vast empire he and his descendants were destined to forge. His vision was soon realized: At its height, the Ottoman realm extended from Hungary to the Persian Gulf, from North Africa to the Caucasus. The Ottoman Empire was one of the largest and most influential empires in world history. For centuries, Europe watched with fear as the Ottomans steadily advanced their rule across the Balkans. Yet travelers and merchants were irresistibly drawn toward Ottoman lands by their fascination with the Orient and the lure of profit. Although it survived for over six centuries, the history of the Ottoman Empire is too often colored by the memory of its bloody final throes. In this magisterial work Caroline Finkel lucidly recounts the epic story of the Ottoman Empire from its origins in the thirteenth century through its destruction on the battlefields of World War I.


message 37: by Kathy (new)

Kathy (Kathy_H) | 2771 comments Daily Life in the Ottoman Empire

Daily Life in the Ottoman Empire by Mehrdad Kia by Mehrdad Kia (no photo)

Synopsis:

The Ottoman Empire was an Islamic imperial monarchy that existed for over 600 years. At the height of its power in the 16th and 17th centuries, it encompassed three continents and served as the core of global interactions between the east and the west. And while the Empire was defeated after World War I and dissolved in 1920, the far-reaching effects and influences of the Ottoman Empire are still clearly visible in today's world cultures.

"Daily Life in the Ottoman Empire" allows readers to gain critical insight into the pluralistic social and cultural history of an empire that ruled a vast region extending from Budapest in Hungary to Mecca in Arabia. Each chapter presents an in-depth analysis of a particular aspect of daily life in the Ottoman Empire.


message 38: by Jill, Assisting Moderator - Military Hist L/Global NF/Eur/Brit/Music (new)

Jill Hutchinson (Bucs1960) | 11491 comments Mod
European opinion of the Ottoman Empire was not exactly what we might think it was as the Empire turned into the "sick man" of Europe.

From the Terror of the World to the Sick Man of Europe

(no image)From the Terror of the World to the Sick Man of Europe: European Images of Ottoman Empire and Society from the Sixteenth Century to the Nineteenth by Peter Lang Publisher (no photo)

Synopsis:

This book sheds new light on the hotly debated issue of Orientalism by looking at the European images of the Ottoman Empire and society over three centuries. Through a careful examination of the European intellectual discourse, this book claims that there was no coherent and constant Europewide vision of the Turks until the eighteenth century and clearly demonstrates that the Age of Reason has not rendered reasonable images of the Turks. Indeed, once inspiring awe, the European opinion of Ottomans was held in contempt during this period.


message 39: by Kathy (new)

Kathy (Kathy_H) | 2771 comments Ottoman Centuries

The Ottoman Centuries by John Patrick Douglas Balfour by John Patrick Douglas Balfour (no photo)

Synopsis:

The Ottoman Empire began in 1300 under the almost legendary Osman I, reached its apogee in the sixteenth century under Suleiman the Magnificent, whose forces threatened the gates of Vienna, and gradually diminished thereafter until Mehmed VI was sent into exile by Mustafa Kemal (Ataturk).

In this definitive history of the Ottoman Empire, Lord Kinross, painstaking historian and superb writer, never loses sight of the larger issues, economic, political, and social. At the same time he delineates his characters with obvious zest, displaying them in all their extravagance, audacity and, sometimes, ruthlessness


message 40: by Kathy (new)

Kathy (Kathy_H) | 2771 comments Sons of the Conquerors

Sons of the Conquerors by Hugh Pope by Hugh Pope (no photo)

Synopsis:

A compellingly readable account of Turkey and its people by acclaimed author, Hugh Pope Since the dissolution of the Ottoman Empire following World War I and the subsequent founding of the Turkish Republic by Ataturk, Turkey has played a prominent, albeit dependent, role in international affairs, as a vital ally to NATO and as a secular Islamic democracy. In this major new work, Hugh Pope provides a vivid picture of the Turkish people, descendants of the nomadic armies that conquered the Byzantine Empire and dominated the region for centuries.

Today the Turks encompass a region much larger than the political boundaries of the nation of Turkey - from China, to Iran, Iraq, the Netherlands, Germany, and all the way to the Appalachian Mountains of the United States. Hugh Pope has travelled the world to encounter and assimilate the many facets of this extraordinarily complex and fascinating ethnic group. Rich with stories and legends stretching back centuries, Sons of the Conquerors is a compellingly readable account of a profoundly neglected subject that brings readers into closer contact with a culture that has shaped history.


message 41: by Jill, Assisting Moderator - Military Hist L/Global NF/Eur/Brit/Music (new)

Jill Hutchinson (Bucs1960) | 11491 comments Mod
An in-depth look at the life of the father of modern Turkey.

Mustafa Kemal Ataturk

Mustafa Kemal Ataturk by Edward J. Erickson by Edward J. Erickson (no photo)

Synopsis

Mustafa Kemal was one of the 20th century's greatest combat commanders. Winston Churchill labeled him as a 'Man of Destiny', his service at Gallipoli and in the War of Independence were pivotal in the success of Turkish armies. Moreover, after leading the Nationalist army to victory and establishing the modern Turkish Republic, he took the name Atatürk, or father of the Turks, as his own.

Born to a middle class family in Salonika, he attended military school in the late 19th century and graduated from the Ottoman Military College in Constantinople in 1905. He saw service in the Italo-Turkish War of 1911-12 and the Balkan Wars of 1912-13 before taking command of the 19th Division based in Gallipoli during World War I. His sterling service led to his promotion to corps command during the fighting against the Russians in the Caucasus after which he took charge of Seventh Army in Palestine, and managed to keep his command during the harrowing retreat following the British victory at the battle of Megiddo in September 1918.

Following the end of the war he took command of the nationalist forces struggling against the occupation of Turkey and managed to defeat Greek forces that sought to occupy Smyrna, thus preserving Turkey's territorial integrity. Following his military victory, Kemal deposed Sultan Mehmed VI, abolishing the sultanate and the caliphate, and became Turkey's first president in 1924, serving until his death 1938. He is remembered in the west today as a secular westernizer and modernizer, who set his country on the path toward democracy and market capitalism.


message 42: by Kathy (new)

Kathy (Kathy_H) | 2771 comments The Renaissance and the Ottoman World

(no image) The Renaissance and the Ottoman World. Edited by Anna Contadini, Claire Norton by Anna Contadini (no photo)

Synopsis:

This volume brings together some of the latest research on the cultural, intellectual, and commercial interactions during the Renaissance between Western Europe and the Middle East, with particular reference to the Ottoman Empire. Recent scholarship has brought to the fore the economic, political, cultural, and personal interactions between Western European Christian states and the Eastern Mediterranean Islamic states, and has therefore highlighted the incongruity of conceiving of an iron curtain bisecting the mentalities of the various socio-political and religious communities located in the same Euro-Mediterranean space. Instead, the emphasis here is on interpreting the Mediterranean as a world traversed by trade routes and associated cultural and intellectual networks through which ideas, people and goods regularly travelled.

The fourteen articles in this volume contribute to an exciting cross-cultural and inter-disciplinary scholarly dialogue that explores elements of continuity and exchange between the two areas and positions the Ottoman Empire as an integral element of the geo-political and cultural continuum within which the Renaissance evolved. The aim of this volume is to refine current understandings of the diverse artistic, intellectual and political interactions in the early modern Mediterranean world and, in doing so, to contribute further to the discussion of the scope and nature of the Renaissance. The articles, from major scholars of the field, include discussions of commercial contacts; the exchange of technological, cartographical, philosophical, and scientific knowledge; the role of Venice in transmitting the culture of the Islamic East Mediterranean to Western Europe; the use of Middle Eastern objects in the Western European Renaissance; shared sources of inspiration in Italian and Ottoman architecture; musical exchanges; and the use of East Mediterranean sources in Western scholarship and European sources in Ottoman scholarship.


message 43: by Kathy (new)

Kathy (Kathy_H) | 2771 comments The Ottoman Empire and the World Around It

The Ottoman Empire and the World Around It by Suraiya Faroqhi by Suraiya Faroqhi (no photo)

Synopsis:

In Islamic law the world was made up of the House of Islam and the House of War with the Ottoman Sultan--the perceived successor to the Caliphs--supreme ruler of the Islamic world. However, Suraiya Faroqhi demonstrates that there was no iron curtain between the Ottoman and other worlds but rather a long-established network of diplomatic, financial, cultural and religious connections. These extended to the empires of Asia and the modern states of Europe. Faroqhi's book is based on a huge study of original and early modern sources, including diplomatic records, travel and geographical writing, as well as personal accounts.


message 44: by Jerome (new)

Jerome | 3488 comments Rise of the Young Turks: Politics, the Military and Ottoman Collapse

Rise of the Young Turks Politics, the Military and Ottoman Collapse by N. Naim Turfan by N. Naim Turfan (no photo)

Synopsis:

The military was the key political institution in early 20th century Turkey. Its duty was to save the state--a responsibility buried deeply in its ethos and tradition--and this was reflected in the young Turk movement and its leader Mustafa Kemal Atatürk. This book examines the historical conditions under which the Ottoman-Turkish military tradition was established, the role it played (especially in the Young Turk era) and the way it set the scene for the transformation from empire to nation-state, the Republic of Turkey. Broad social and historical settings introduce coverage of the tumultuous events of the period 1908-1913 in a lively historical narrative with accompanying commentary.


message 45: by Jerome (last edited Dec 26, 2013 10:09AM) (new)

Jerome | 3488 comments A Military History of the Ottomans: From Osman to Ataturk

A Military History of the Ottomans From Osman to Ataturk by Mesut Uyar by Mesut Uyar (no photo)

Synopsis:

The Ottoman Army had a significant effect on the history of the modern world and particularly on that of the Middle East and Europe. This study, written by a Turkish and an American scholar, is a revision and corrective to western accounts because it is based on Turkish interpretations, rather than European interpretations, of events. As the world's dominant military machine from 1300 to the mid-1700's, the Ottoman Army led the way in military institutions, organizational structures, technology, and tactics. In decline thereafter, it nevertheless remained a considerable force to be counted in the balance of power through 1918. From its nomadic origins, it underwent revolutions in military affairs as well as several transformations which enabled it to compete on favorable terms with the best of armies of the day. This study tracks the growth of the Ottoman Army as a professional institution from the perspective of the Ottomans themselves, by using previously untapped Ottoman source materials. Additionally, the impact of important commanders and the role of politics, as these affected the army, are examined. The study concludes with the Ottoman legacy and its effect on the Republic and modern Turkish Army.

This is a study survey that combines an introductory view of this subject with fresh and original reference-level information. Divided into distinct periods, Uyar and Erickson open with a brief overview of the establishment of the Ottoman Empire and the military systems that shaped the early military patterns. The Ottoman army emerged forcefully in 1453 during the siege of Constantinople and became a dominant social and political force for nearly two hundred years following Mehmed's capture of the city. When the army began to show signs of decay during the mid-seventeenth century, successive Sultans actively sought to transform the institution that protected their power. The reforms and transformations that began frist in 1606successfully preserved the army until the outbreak of the Ottoman-Russian War in 1876. Though the war was brief, its impact was enormous as nationalistic and republican strains placed increasing pressure on the Sultan and his army until, finally, in 1918, those strains proved too great to overcome. By 1923, Mustafa Kemal Ataturk emerged as the leader of a unified national state ruled by a new National Parliament. As Uyar and Erickson demonstrate, the old army of the Sultan had become the army of the Republic, symbolizing the transformation of a dying empire to the new Turkish state make clear that throughout much of its existence, the Ottoman Army was an effective fighting force with professional military institutions and organizational structures.


message 46: by Kathy (new)

Kathy (Kathy_H) | 2771 comments Nice additions, Jerome. Thanks.


message 47: by Kathy (new)

Kathy (Kathy_H) | 2771 comments A Brief History of the Late Ottoman Empire

A Brief History of the Late Ottoman Empire by M. Şükrü Hanioğlu by M. Şükrü Hanioğlu (no photo)

Synopsis:

At the turn of the nineteenth century, the Ottoman Empire straddled three continents and encompassed extraordinary ethnic and cultural diversity among the estimated thirty million people living within its borders. It was perhaps the most cosmopolitan state in the world--and possibly the most volatile. "A Brief History of the Late Ottoman Empire" now gives scholars and general readers a concise history of the late empire between 1789 and 1918, turbulent years marked by incredible social change.

Moving past standard treatments of the subject, M. Sukru Hanioglu emphasizes broad historical trends and processes more than single events. He examines the imperial struggle to centralize amid powerful opposition from local rulers, nationalist and other groups, and foreign powers. He looks closely at the socioeconomic changes this struggle wrought and addresses the Ottoman response to the challenges of modernity. Hanioglu shows how this history is not only essential to comprehending modern Turkey, but is integral to the histories of Europe and the world. He brings Ottoman society marvelously to life in all its facets--cultural, diplomatic, intellectual, literary, military, and political--and he mines imperial archives and other documents from the period to describe it as it actually was, not as it has been portrayed in postimperial nationalist narratives. "A Brief History of the Late Ottoman Empire" is a must-read for anyone seeking to understand the legacy left in this empire's ruins--a legacy the world still grapples with today.


message 48: by Kathy (new)

Kathy (Kathy_H) | 2771 comments Islamic Gunpowder Empires: Ottomans, Safavids, and Mughals

Islamic Gunpowder Empires Ottomans, Safavids, and Mughals by Douglas E. Streusand by Douglas E. Streusand (no photo)

Synopsis:

Islamic Gunpowder Empires provides readers with a history of Islamic civilization in the early modern world through a comparative examination of Islam’s three greatest empires—the Ottomans (centered in what is now Turkey), the Safavids (in modern Iran), and the Mughals (ruling the Indian subcontinent). Author Douglas Streusand explains the origins of the three empires; compares the ideological, institutional, military, and economic contributors to their success; and analyzes the causes of their rise, expansion, and ultimate transformation and decline. Streusand depicts the three empires as a part of an integrated international system extending from the Atlantic to the Straits of Malacca, emphasizing both the connections and the conflicts within that system. He presents the empires as complex polities in which Islam is one political and cultural component among many. The treatment of the Ottoman, Safavid, and Mughal empires incorporates contemporary scholarship, dispels common misconceptions, and provides an excellent platform for further study.


message 49: by Cassandra (last edited Mar 16, 2014 06:12PM) (new)

Cassandra | 7 comments Kathy wrote: "Islamic Gunpowder Empires: Ottomans, Safavids, and Mughals

Synops..."


Thank you for sharing this it looks very interesting. It is definitely going on my list of books to read in the near future.


message 50: by Kathy (new)

Kathy (Kathy_H) | 2771 comments Awesome, Cassandra. Let me know what you think of the read.


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Books mentioned in this topic

The Ottoman Empire, 1700-1922 (other topics)
Lords of the Horizons: A History of the Ottoman Empire (other topics)
The Ottoman Centuries (other topics)
Lords of the Horizons: A History of the Ottoman Empire (other topics)
My Name is Red (other topics)
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Authors mentioned in this topic

Donald Quataert (other topics)
Jason Goodwin (other topics)
John Patrick Douglas Balfour (other topics)
Ivo Andrić (other topics)
Meša Selimović (other topics)
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