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Hamlet
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Book Chat > Why adults read Young Adult fiction?

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message 1: by N.B. (new)

N.B. Dixon I have very few adult books on my shelf in comparison with my children's and young adult collection. I've tried time and again to read adult fiction but I always return to this genre. I think the main reason is that I found the characters in children's and Young adult fiction much better drawn. I feel for them more and there's always so much emotion in these books, whether they're action/adventure, mystery or romance. I find "adult themes" rather boring and I just don't connect with the stories in the same way (with a few exceptions). Also, children's fiction has a timeless quality about it which many adult books lack. With more adults reading Children and Young Adult fiction all the time, I'm curious what draws all of you to the books you read?


Angie (pinkindle) | 805 comments This is a good question.

I would have to agree with you about not connecting to stories with adult themes. I do read adult fiction, but I never have those "Oh I've been there" or "I understand how she feels" moments. I definitely have plenty of those moments with YA books, since I have more likely experienced some of the same events and feelings in high school.


message 3: by D.G. (last edited Oct 04, 2011 09:30AM) (new)

D.G. I read YA because the stories are good and it's interesting seeing stuff from the perspective of a young person that has no experience and is learning about the world and him/herself.

I don't connect with YA characters anymore than I connect with adult ones. It all depends if the character is interesting and well drawn (but I read almost everything.)


Hillary (Eledri) | 681 comments I read adult and YA. However, with that being said I do tend to lean more towards YA. Part of me thinks this is because Im YA at heart and the other is because while I was a YA I was reading more classics and adult fiction for school. I didn't really have much time to read for the joy of reading then so this is a way to do so now.

I was once fairly ashamed to be so drawn to the YA section of a bookstore. Now, pfft! Not anymore. Some books like Twenty Boy Summer I'd never have found if I avoided the YA section. This book is surprisingly excellent at depicting grief and how people deal with it. It doesn't change between YA and adult how people deal. They do it in their own ways. It's gems like this that also keep drawing me back for more YA.

My favorite adult books with the exception of the Fever series and my guilty pleasure of the Sookie Stackhouse books are all written by writers who have YA books/series too. I am sucked into those characters and situations just as easily as I am in YA characters and situations. Those who know my taste know exactly the authors I am talking about. lol


message 5: by Wendy F, biblioholic (new)

Wendy F (blessedwannab) | 2525 comments I'm kinda like D.G.

It's pretty cut and dry for me, I read whatever interests me. And whether or not I relate to a character depends more on how well the author is at characterization. If the character comes alive for me, I will tend to relate to them emotionally if not specifically to their situation.

And that can happen in either adult or YA novels.


message 6: by Jenny, puppets' bane (new) - rated it 5 stars

Jenny (narcisse) | 1874 comments The perspective of a child or teenager is more interesting to read. Even a lot of adult books are written from a kid's point of view. Think of books like To Kill a Mockingbird or The Catcher in the Rye or any number of other classics and a lot of them are from the point of view of young people. But they're not YA books. It's only recently that everything seems to be labeled as YA just because of younger protagonists. Probably because YA sells more books and they want to market it as that because that's where the money is being spent and made (since kids and teens have higher disposable income than adults do, I guess). But now adults act like there's some kind of a stigma associated with reading books about teenagers, just because of a marketing label slapped onto them by publishers and book sellers. It's sort of stupid.

I read a lot of different types of things. Outside of YA, I mostly read epic fantasies and classics and heavier things like that, so YA provides a nice contrast to that stuff, since it's usually more upbeat, lighter, and more hopeful in its darkness than adult books are.

Also, as an adult who is on the young side of adulthood, it's difficult to find books that deal with the age gap in between being a young adult and a mature adult. I'm in between.


message 7: by Wendy F, biblioholic (new)

Wendy F (blessedwannab) | 2525 comments I guess it's because (here I go) kids are growing up so much faster then I did when I was young. Their tv shows are more mature, their reading material is more mature...

When I was a kid there was no difference between 'Early Reader' and 'Young Adult'. Everything was just 'Teen' and it housed like Nancy Drew and Sweet Valley High. Anything with super mature content was just adult.

So I guess that's why I get so ticked when my mom looks down on me reading in the Young Adult section. It's like she has no grasp on the extremely mature books that are in this section these days. Books like The Perks of being a Wallflower, Life of Pi, and Ender's Game that were considered 'Adult' are now part of the YA section. Life of Pi is one of my mothers favorite novels, but even knowing that it's in the YA section she still snubs her nose at the books I lend her that she thinks may come from that part of the store. Her first question is 'What section was it in?' I always ask her why it matters.


message 8: by Stacia (the 2010 club), groupaholic (last edited Oct 04, 2011 01:30PM) (new)

Stacia (the 2010 club) (Stacia_R) | 4911 comments Jenny, do you mean colleged aged, or more mid to late 20's/into early 30's? There are books like this out there, but they're going to be adult of course.

As for the original question - what draws me? Well I think YA is a lot of fun! I feel a little sorry for adults who discount YA altogether because they had a bad experience with one or two of the more popular books that don't necessarily represent YA as a whole. They're missing out some great reads.

I read both YA and adult. Other than the past month when I started this group and wanted to focus on reading more YA for a while to get in the mood to talk about it, I'd say that I have tried to go 50/50 with my adult and YA.

There's a benefit to reading both I think. YA books tend to have authors willing to take a leap and present stories that you don't often find in adult fiction. It's almost as if there is license to let the imagination run wild. Adult books often have a depth of character and situations that I'd rather find myself in.

Sometimes I think with adult books, it's about finding the right authors and genres to read to fit your style (I have wandering mind tendencies, so overly descriptive authors are hard for me). I have a hard time with adult sci-fi for example, but have fallen in love with adult urban fantasy and historical fiction. I like adult fantasy, but only from certain authors.


message 9: by Wendy F, biblioholic (new)

Wendy F (blessedwannab) | 2525 comments You are so right, it is about finding the right authors and genre's.

For me I'm like that about both YA and Adult. Some authors or genre's in both groups tend to turn me off. For instance, I can't do contemporary Adult, but I love contemporary YA. I'm the opposite with Paranormal. I struggle with Paranormal YA, and I usually get more out of Paranormal adult...


message 10: by Jenny, puppets' bane (new) - rated it 5 stars

Jenny (narcisse) | 1874 comments Stacia (point and laugh) wrote: "Jenny, do you mean colleged aged, or more mid to late 20's/into early 30's? There are books like this out there, but they're going to be adult of course."

I guess I meant more of a mentality type thing. I'm more mature than a teenager or college kid but I don't feel at all like I'm a mature adult, if that makes sense. Except for fantasy novels, which I do read a lot of, or chick lit, most (not all, but most) contemporary adult fiction is pretty drab.

I'd love to see more of what the YA community is starting to call "new adult" with college-aged protagonists, or more mid-twenties to early thirties literature that isn't so freaking serious and dull and slow, outside of the genres that already do this.

I like variety without boredom, and the YA section seems like it fulfills this one thing better than anything else.


message 11: by Stacia (the 2010 club), groupaholic (new)

Stacia (the 2010 club) (Stacia_R) | 4911 comments Adult contemporary is the one of the only genres I don't go out of my way to read, unless it's either highly recommended, or it's a monthly read for a group I mod. Because I had little interest in adult contemps, I put off reading YA contemp for so long, and I missed out on some good books because of it.

I haven't seen a whole lot of new adult yet, but I keep hearing buzz about it. Maybe the market hasn't been fully saturated yet.

I'm finding that I like books that take place at colleges. Maybe because it grants the character some freedoms that high school doesn't. A few of my favorites from the past year were about college or post-college experiences.


message 12: by Samantha (last edited Oct 04, 2011 05:12PM) (new)

Samantha | 176 comments That's a good question. I'd have to say I read them because they're good stories and I think, depending a lot on the genre, adult books get weighed down by their own sense of importance, imo. I rarely read adult contemp fiction either, but that's just my own reading preference.

BTW, does anyone else see at the top of the thread that it mentions this topic is about Hamlet...is there some kind of glitch?


message 13: by N.B. (new)

N.B. Dixon I'm really glad I raised this question. I was interested Jenny that you read the classics and epic fantasy from adult fiction. I too have a few epic and paranormal fantasies on my bookshelf, but mainly it's the classics. I've tried over and over to read contemporary adult fiction from all sorts of genres and I just don't like it. I personally think adults who turn their noses up at YA are missing out on some wonderful novels. I suppose they still believe it's written in a childlike way as it would have been when they were little, or they're ashamed of what people will think of them. As a kid, I spent too much time worrying about what people think of me. Now I don't give a damn. Mind you, being blind, I can't see if people are giving me odd glances and as my books are on my Ipod anyway, they remain my little secret. As an author, I love writing YA fantasy because it provides such a lot of scope for my imagination.


message 14: by D.G. (new)

D.G. It's funny but my husband (who doesn't read any popular stuff at all...he's into really serious stuff like classics, poetry and plays) told me that YA seemed to be coming out with the most interesting stuff (just what I tell him about what I'm reading.)

Wendy - How old is your Mom? If she's over 60, maybe she's finding it too hard to relate to the characters.


Hillary (Eledri) | 681 comments My grandmother is 69 and I've gotten her to read YA. She damn near mauled me trying to finish the Hunger Games. I wasn't sending the books to her nook fast enough.


message 16: by Emily (new)

Emily (LibraryLil) | 343 comments I can always fall back on "because I work with teens" as my answer, but in reality, I would read YA even if I didn't work with teens.

For me, some of it is what others have said--interesting characters, interesting stories, characters I can relate to. I also think that writers who write for teens have to do things better than writers who work for adults--if you don't grab teens right away and keep them interested, your book won't work. Adult writers can get away with a lot more "wool gathering" and I just don't like that as much. (And the phrase "wool gathering" was in a review I read yesterday of a high-profile adult book coming out this month.)

Another thing that I like about YA is that genres are less important and less precise. Books can blend genres and bend genres in a way that just "isn't done" much in adult literature, partly because people then wouldn't know where to put it.


message 17: by Wendy F, biblioholic (new)

Wendy F (blessedwannab) | 2525 comments My mom is only 49 years old. She's just snobby, lol.


message 18: by Cambria (new)

Cambria (Cambria409) Emily wrote: "I can always fall back on "because I work with teens" as my answer, but in reality, I would read YA even if I didn't work with teens.

For me, some of it is what others have said--interesting cha..."


I agree with you! i think the YA bar is set high.


message 19: by Cambria (new)

Cambria (Cambria409) Hillary wrote: "My grandmother is 69 and I've gotten her to read YA. She damn near mauled me trying to finish the Hunger Games. I wasn't sending the books to her nook fast enough."

LOL


message 20: by Kim (new) - rated it 4 stars

Kim I enjoy reading all types of genres whether they are YA or adult. As long as a book is well written and I can engage with the characters I don't really care which section of the book store it is found.

That being said the reason I enjoy reading so much is because I like to escape into another world with new experiences and points of few. In my opinion YA books will go places adult books won't. Adult literature deals with family drama, marriage, death and loss, etc. All things that I deal with everyday in my real life. YA brings me to dystopian worlds and wizarding schools. How can you compete with that? Plus I find reading this genre helps me relate better to my teen and preteen daughters and helps me find great books for them to read.


message 21: by Amy (new) - rated it 1 star

Amy | 4 comments Well.... I think the reality is that more adults are reading YA because some of today's YA is a little more adult than it was in the past. Look at the House of Night series by P.C. and Kristen Cast.... the YA books of the 60s might not have gone where that series went with it's main character. Today's YA stuff, particularly the YA fantasy/sci-fi stuff is fun without being stupid fluff.


message 22: by Stacia (the 2010 club), groupaholic (new)

Stacia (the 2010 club) (Stacia_R) | 4911 comments Welcome to the group Kim. :) I agree that it's more about the book/author than if it's YA or adult.


message 23: by Sarah (new)

Sarah Baethge (22niel) | 4 comments I was almost insulted when someone looking at my self-drawn covers instantly classified me as YA, but thinking about it, there is no reason why they couldn't be.


Shera (Book Whispers) (SheraBookWhispers) | 254 comments I just realized that I own way more adult books then YA. I tend to get bored with YA books if I read too many in a row too.

It's kind of funny.


message 25: by D.G. (last edited Oct 11, 2011 09:14AM) (new)

D.G. Shera - That happens for me with all genres. I cannot read too much of the same thing. I need to mix it up!


Shera (Book Whispers) (SheraBookWhispers) | 254 comments Glad I'm not the only one.


message 27: by S.M. (new)

S.M. Reine (smreine) It's like they say, YA is a perspective, not a genre. People underestimate how interesting and insightful teens are.

Anyway, the books are also often shorter than books for adults, and I think that forces the writers to be more "efficient" with their plots. Most books could stand to have a good 20% cut out of them without suffering, but YA books are usually lean and mean. I love that.


Shera (Book Whispers) (SheraBookWhispers) | 254 comments That's true S.M. YA authors can't "waste" pages like some of the 600-700 page adult books do.


message 29: by Shannon (new)

Shannon Dermott | 15 comments Kim wrote: "I enjoy reading all types of genres whether they are YA or adult. As long as a book is well written and I can engage with the characters I don't really care which section of the book store it is fo..."

Well said.


message 30: by Teresa (new)

Teresa Edgerton (TeresaEdgerton) | 3 comments I read YA book in large part because I never found any reason why I should stop. Probably I read about half-and-half YA and adult these days. These things tend to go through cycles for me, but for more than a year it's been pretty equally balanced. I agree that if a book is well-written it doesn't matter where it's shelved in the bookstore or the library ... at least not for me. I like long books, but sometimes I like a story that is more self-contained. And beyond and in spite of all the seemingly endless series about vampires and werewolves (I have nothing against either on principle, but you can have too much of a good thing, and the books aren't always good) ... where was I? Oh yes, in spite of that, I find that YA fiction is more adventurous. You can see trends there that haven't made it to adult fiction yet, but will a few years later.


message 31: by J.d. (new) - rated it 3 stars

J.d. Watts (JDWatts) | 5 comments I love to read YA and I'm not ashamed of it...although i have to admit that I blushed ten shades of scarlet when I was looking for Twilight a few years back and the guy at Borders rolled his eyes and pointed over his shoulder saying "Children's." I think part of the deal too like others said is that a lot of lit that used to be published adult is now being published YA so it has a broader audience. This was something that we discussed when my books were published. The character was college-aged, there was no language or sexuality that would make it off limits for YA readers, and so we decided to market it YA even though it might easily be considered adult. The nice thing about it is that today people like US read YA without shame now too, so authors can do that, where ten years ago or so YA and Children's just didn't seem to sell as well. Some people who have it in their heads that all YA are like Sweet Valley High will miss out, but I think the word is leaking out to the general population that YA is a now a treasure trove of great novels worth plundering!


message 32: by Teresa (last edited Oct 16, 2011 04:57PM) (new)

Teresa Edgerton (TeresaEdgerton) | 3 comments J.d. wrote: "I love to read YA and I'm not ashamed of it...although i have to admit that I blushed ten shades of scarlet when I was looking for Twilight a few years back and the guy at Borders rolled his eyes a..."

I think that after the first few times I went into a bookstore and walked into the YA section I stopped wondering what other people thought. I just assumed they would think I was looking for something to give a younger brother or sister, or later, that I was a schoolteacher or a parent (or now, quite rightly, that I'm a grandmother, although my grandchildren don't happen to be that old). I really do believe that most people would think that if they saw an adult in the YA section.

But if they want to think that I'm just weird ... that's OK, too. I am weird*, and that goes far beyond my reading habits. I've come to terms with that a long time ago.


*Although at my age we prefer to call it "eccentric."


message 33: by J.d. (new) - rated it 3 stars

J.d. Watts (JDWatts) | 5 comments Teresa wrote: "J.d. wrote: "I love to read YA and I'm not ashamed of it...although i have to admit that I blushed ten shades of scarlet when I was looking for Twilight a few years back and the guy at Borders roll..."

LOL.... well stated :)


message 34: by Pierre (new)

Pierre Rooyen (httpwwwgoodreadscompierre) | 17 comments Some lovely comments here. Got me giggling, because I have a thirteen year old grand daughter, and what do I write? Young Adult, for sure.

Why? Because most adults take themselves so seriously and are so boring, while children lead such exciting lives.

Perhaps YA is a misnomer. The best stories in this genre are really adult books featuring child protagonists.

In one novel, my protagonist is introduced at four years of age and winds up eight years old. In the other, the heroine enters at ten and carries on through fourteen.

Lots of work, about five rewrites each time to get the writing right but it's paying dividends.

My reading too is mostly Young Adult. But if a fab adult story like Water For Elephants or The Girl With The Dragon Tatoo comes along, I swoon and read them more than once.

Have fun everybody.


message 35: by Kim (new) - rated it 4 stars

Kim Hello Everyone,

I have a question to pose to the group which I believe goes along with the topic of this conversation, (or at least I hope it does). Has anyone found that reading YA books as an adult you are more affected by them than you were as a young adult? I've been having a hard time lately enjoying any of the adult books I have picked up and I'm wondering if it is because I have become so invested in the YA books that the adult ones have no appeal.


For instance, I read "Twenty Boy Summer" last night. I hate the title and don't think it gives the story any justice but I absolutely LOVED the book. I devoured it in one night, which isn't strange for me, but starting to cry by page 5 and not really stopping the whole way through definitely is. Even now, 9 hours later, I find myself getting choked up if I think about it and my heart literally hurts. I haven't had this kind of reaction to an adult book in years and I don't know if I would have had this type of reaction at say, 16. The last time I felt like this was probably with "My Sister's Keeper" and it wasn't anything like this. And the thing is, it's not just this book or the sadness factor. I had to have my arm practically twisted behind my back to get me to read the "Twilight" series and yet once I started I was pulled right back to memories of my first love and completely sucked in. Whether it is reality-based, fantasy, paranormal, etc., it doesn't matter. If it is YA I like the plot, the characters, the setting, everything, better than the adult counterparts.

What is it about YA books that invokes such a strong reaction? Am I the only one that feels that way? Is it possible that I am just getting less mature the older I get? (I don't really care-Keep giving me books that keep me up all night crying and I'll go back to diapers, but still).


message 36: by Jenny, puppets' bane (new) - rated it 5 stars

Jenny (narcisse) | 1874 comments Kim, I think that YA is more emotional because teenagers emotions are so intense and hit such a broad spectrum. So YA writers try to capture this, at least the good ones. And Twenty Boy Summer is a GOOD ONE. I've never read another book, YA or adult or whatever, that captured the intensity of grief with such accuracy and strength the way that Sarah Ockler did in that book.


message 37: by Ottilie (new)

Ottilie (ottilie_weber) | 90 comments Part of it I think is that YA books are shorter then adult books so drag less so you get more into the characters then the actual plot.


message 38: by Pierre (last edited Oct 22, 2011 07:57PM) (new)

Pierre Rooyen (httpwwwgoodreadscompierre) | 17 comments When I see the thoughts you guys are expressing, I find myself saying, yes, yes, yes.

And yet I am a generation ahead of you. I can't really fit in.

It occured to me I was immature in being attracted to YA, but it seems I am reasonably sane.

My children just roll their eyes when I get involved with the passion of childhood adventure.

Perhaps it's my love of outdoors and feeling of being squeezed in a city, but adult novels turn me off with their guns, car chases, macho males with their pride in their pants, bum and titty women, gratuitous violence, murders and know-all-ism.

The YA I have read may not be quite the same you read, but I find a freshness, a naivity of characters coupled with a determination to succeed. A sort of David and Goliath feel. And that gets them admiration and an empathetic reader willing them on. Bring in a little first-love and away we go, tee-hee. Lots of fun.


message 39: by Jessica (new)

Jessica (Jessryn) | 1 comments I read YA for many reasons. As some others have mentioned, I think the writing is tighter and more plot focused, which I like. Since the key demographic for YA is female, I think there are a lot more strong female characters.

More literary adult fiction often depresses me, and I like that YA can deal with serious topics but that I'm often still left feeling hopeful at the end(though not as though everything has been wrapped up too neatly).

I read some genre adult fiction, a good amount of romance and some fantasy. However since I've gotten so involved with YA, I have a hard time getting recommendations for adult books that I would like.


message 40: by Wendy F, biblioholic (new)

Wendy F (blessedwannab) | 2525 comments Well said!

I agree that I think it's because while we all may be older now, we can all still relate because we remember our naivety and our first love, and such.

We can imagine what it would be to be young and go through such heartache.


message 41: by Anna (Yoda Is My Spirit Animal) (last edited Oct 22, 2011 08:18PM) (new) - rated it 4 stars

Anna (Yoda Is My Spirit Animal) (AriciasTragedy21) | 662 comments Jessica wrote: "I read YA for many reasons. As some others have mentioned, I think the writing is tighter and more plot focused, which I like. Since the key demographic for YA is female, I think there are a lot mo..."

I know! A lot of the adult books I read seem depressing to me compared to the YA counterparts. And this coming from someone who reads Hunger Games and loves the way it makes her heart hurt. Maybe that's the difference - adult just gives me a headache, but YA makes me feel the way a book should. Like it was said above, it's also a trial to find adult books about people between ages 20 and 35 sometimes that sound even halfway interesting (this coming from a 21 year old college student). Books are made that much more great by relatable characters. There aren't enough Adult ones for me to jump ship just yet.


Hillary (Eledri) | 681 comments Kim, you are not alone, I think I was in tears by like page 3 of that book, and books, movies, tv shows, they just don't make me cry. That books was beautifully written and most importantly...honest.

I tend to agree with Jenny. YA books tend to capture the broad spectrum of emotions, because as teens, that is what it's like. Also YA books are shorter so the authors have to focus and not blither with too much filler fluff. In a lot of adult books the filler is just too much. I start wanting to rip out pages until I find myself back at the plot. Granted this is not how it is for all adult book...but for A LOT of them it is. Which is part of the reason I always go back for more YA.

Graveminder by Melissa Marr is actually adult with the leads being 26-28 I believe. I just remember it was either close to or my actual age. lol Anywho, it is YA author Melissa Marr's first stab at adult. It wasn't bad but wasn't great either, and is paranormal. Just thought I'd toss it out there since ^--Anna said she hadn't found many in the age range. :P


message 43: by D.L. (new)

D.L. Morrese (DL_Morrese) | 5 comments Jessica wrote: "I read YA for many reasons. As some others have mentioned, I think the writing is tighter and more plot focused, which I like. Since the key demographic for YA is female, I think there are a lot mo..."
Jessica, I think you got it in one word, for me anyway "hopeful." I read mostly SF and Fantasy and the adult genre fiction is often dark and depressing and relies on action and often graphic sex and violence to carry the story - such as it is. The YA more frequently focuses on discovery and growth and tends to have a more hopeful mood.


message 44: by S.M. (new)

S.M. Reine (smreine) I like hearing the word "hope" thrown around in this discussion. YA brings adult readers back to a time when we still benefited from some youthful naivete, when we really thought that we could fall in love and marry the most popular guy in school or when we felt like we could live forever.

Adulthood, and adult books, are more cynical. There are a lot more ruminations on death. We've realized bad things can and do happen, and it's easy to wallow in that.

Meanwhile, YA is focusing on delivering an awesome plot with awesome characters. It can be sad, or depressing, but it's usually still hopeful for a better outcome. Who would want to read anything else?


message 45: by Stacia (the 2010 club), groupaholic (new)

Stacia (the 2010 club) (Stacia_R) | 4911 comments Welcome to the group Evan. :)


message 46: by Jenny, puppets' bane (new) - rated it 5 stars

Jenny (narcisse) | 1874 comments I think when comparing YA lit to "adult" lit, we're focusing on contemporary writers and aren't comparing it to Transcendentalists like Emerson. Adult contemporary writers of today are a lot darker. So are many of today's YA writers. The difference is that YA writers put a much higher emphasis on that element of hope and potential for change and the "it gets better" mentality, because there is a need for that reassurance among the members of their demographic. Adult novelists are more willing to include hard truths even when they're hopelessly dire.
YA lit is a fairly recent development, so I think it's sort of a moot point to compare it to classics except to point out that many classics of the past are marketed as YA nowadays when before they were not.


message 47: by Jenny, puppets' bane (new) - rated it 5 stars

Jenny (narcisse) | 1874 comments Diversity is important for sure. I think most of us read a wide variety of things. I don't think you sounded hostile. I just wanted to clarify that the statement someone made about YA being more hopeful than adult books is most likely a comparison of more contemporary works rather than including classics or even fantasy, etc. A lot of adult contemporary works focus on things like financial schemes or divorce or war or mid-life crises and stuff that many of us either can't relate to yet or don't want to be reading about because it's depressing and doesn't contain the hopeful messages of YA novels, either because adults are more disillusioned and jaded or because they're trying to be more serious and literary or want to write an ending that they feel isn't so happily-ever-after. I don't know what the reason behind it is, but adult books are just less optimistic. Adults are less optimistic. I think of myself as a realist, even cynical at times, but I like optimism. It's uplifting. And YA just has more of it (at least, in comparison to modern adult literary fiction).

Since we're putting some quotes out there, this one is one of my favorites. It refers to fairy tales, but I think it could be applied to YA/kidlit in general, and I think it does a good job of relating that optimism that is captured in young people's stories:

“Fairy tales are more than true; not because they tell us that dragons exist, but because they tell us that dragons can be beaten.” —G.K. Chesterton


Shera (Book Whispers) (SheraBookWhispers) | 254 comments Well put Evan.


message 49: by Jenny, puppets' bane (new) - rated it 5 stars

Jenny (narcisse) | 1874 comments I don't think that anyone who surrounds themselves with one genre (or with television or anything else) runs risk of becoming stupid enough to confuse fiction and reality. If they're conflating the two, then it's because there's something else wrong with their neurology or psyche. In fact, I would argue that people who read a lot of fiction (of ANY genre) are more apt to better understand the world rather than become detached from it.


message 50: by Jenny, puppets' bane (new) - rated it 5 stars

Jenny (narcisse) | 1874 comments lol WHY is this topic about Hamlet?


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Twenty Boy Summer (other topics)
Life of Pi (other topics)
Ender's Game (other topics)
The Perks of Being a Wallflower (other topics)
Graveminder (other topics)
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