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Group Read Discussions > July/August 2011 Group Read: Daughters of Rome by Kate Quinn

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message 1: by Becky, Moddess (new)

Becky (Beckyofthe19and9) | 3420 comments Discuss! You know you want to!! ;)

Remember to mark your spoilers!


message 2: by JenC. (new)

JenC. (jencornelius) | 484 comments I'm patiently waiting for my turn to check this out from the library so I can participate! Should be in by the end of the month, if not sooner....


message 3: by Zee (last edited Jul 16, 2011 08:02AM) (new)

Zee | 96 comments I've already finished. Loved it, a five-star read for me! My spoiler-free review is here.

I'm going to muse on some good points for discussion then add some thoughts here in a bit. :-) Can't wait to hear what everyone thinks! And I hope Kate will be able to chip in too.


message 4: by Kate (new)

Kate Quinn | 676 comments I can definitely chime in if anyone has a question! Thanks for reading, everybody. And if you read it and don't like it, don't hesitate to say why - I can learn that way, and I want to. :)

Zee, I got a kick out of your review! So glad you liked the book. I actually did a guest blog post on my blog tour, comparing "Daughters of Rome" to "Sex and the City" as you did. (I was running low on topic ideas at the time.) I think it's here -

http://www.hf-connection.com/2011/04/...


message 5: by ToniS (new)

ToniS | 204 comments Dang, I thought I was making a unique observation when after reading the first chapter I said it was kind of like "Sex and the City" set in ancient Rome!

I'm about halfway through the book. I don't think I've ever read anything set here, so I am going to wikipedia a lot to look things up.


Victoria_Grossack Grossack (VictoriaGrossack) | 604 comments Since the author can read this anyway, I might as well as put this here...

As the author has said, Daughters of Rome is like the sitcom Sex in the City, with a cast of four extremely modern women during a year of political turmoil. Perhaps the mix will work for some readers; it didn’t for me. There were some good bits – the opening scene with the astrologer was especially strong. Perhaps the endless parties and the chaotic feeling to the book – although the chaotic feeling may have been caused by my eyes glazing over - is a good way to understand how it felt to be Rome in the year of four emperors. Nevertheless I was struck by the complete impossibility of most of the story, especially in the details and the characters of the women. (Diana is completely unbelievable, in terms of her goal – and she’s so one-dimensional that she only has one, and it must be red, not blue! – and her actions, given the time, are absurd.) Nor did I come away with a much better understanding of that year, which is what I’d hoped for.

It’s clear from the author’s note that she has done her research – and there were bits of the book that worked for me. But most did not.

Maybe I’m just a fuddy-duddy who prefers the realism and complex characters of Robert Graves and even Colleen McCullough. Maybe I should have not approached it seriously and have just expected a lightweight novel. Maybe everyone else will find more to enjoy – I hope so.

And now I feel as if I've broken all the rules of "How to Win Friends and Influence People." Ah, well.


message 7: by Shay (new)

Shay | 384 comments Victoria, I think you've made a good point about managing expectations when reading a novel. I must admit that when it's a HF about Rome, I automatically think of those two authors, Graves and McCullough, you named. I plan to read this book, so I'll probably enjoy it more now that I know what to expect.


message 8: by Diana (last edited Jul 16, 2011 01:24PM) (new)

Diana (LMD129) | 51 comments I just finished it this morning after spending two months on it, but to be fair I took a break from it last month so it really was only about a month and a half. I kind of struggled to get past the first two parts but the last two felt a lot more natural, taking a break really helped me.
I kind of hesitated on my rating of it since I thought it deserved higher than a 3 but I couldn't bring myself to give it a 4. I liked the story and the relationship between the characters, but it felt a little thrown together.
It was good though, plus I couldn't help but admire Marcella, I don't know why but I've always been drawn to characters like her. I really liked the way it ended.


message 9: by Kate (new)

Kate Quinn | 676 comments Victoria_Grossack wrote: "And now I feel as if I've broken all the rules of "How to Win Friends and Influence People." Ah, well."

Not at all, Victoria. I'm glad you posted here. Of course I'm always sorry when a book of mine doesn't connect with a reader, but I like to hear why - it will help me write better in the future. Thanks for your feedback!


message 10: by Maggie (new)

Maggie (mmorrell) | 19 comments Well. Winning friends. Not this time. I haven't finished the book yet because I got bored and I have so many books I want to read, if one is just not working for me I like to move on. I will finish this one, however, since it is my first group read, and other people like it, so maybe I just haven't gotten to the part yet that will tell me "there it is, this is what its all about!" Otherwise,to me, its just 4 incredibly spoiled rich ladies who have nothing interesting going on.


message 11: by Teralyn (new)

Teralyn Pilgrim | 61 comments Geez, guys. I've never been a part of a book group before, but you all are harsh! Since Kate is kind enough to grace us with her presence, maybe we can say the same things in a gentler tone? I guess if Kate doesn't mind, I shouldn't either.

I just got my book in the mail and will start reading it tonight. I'm glad I'm not the only one who isn't done... I thought everyone would already be discussing it in intimate detail and I'd feel left out.

I liked "I, Claudius" but couldn't get through "First Man in Rome" to save my life. Bor-ing (and I love Roman history too!)


message 12: by Jackie, That's Her Constableness to you! (last edited Jul 18, 2011 06:43PM) (new)

Jackie (TheNightOwl) | 2839 comments I just started it last night. I'm already up to the second part- Otho. I admit this one didn't grab me as quickly as Mistress of Rome did, but something big happened towards the end of part one and now it has my full attention. :)

I can see the comparison to Sex and the City and I can see how at first it comes off as 4 spoiled rich girls living it up Roman style. But I think once you reach the end of Part One you will find there is a bit more to it. Maggie, I don't know where you left off, but I would give it a 100 pages or so before completely giving up on it.

Spoilers up to Part Two:
(view spoiler)


message 13: by Mel (new)

Mel Fouch (melfouch) | 2 comments I'm about halfway through and thoroughly enjoying it.

I do find Diana a bit irritating, but otherwise the main characters are very engaging and I'm eager to see what happens to them next. Marcella is definitely my favourite, and turning out to be even more interesting that I had initially thought.

There seems a good balance between driving the plot forward and developing the characters, and whilst I can't claim enough knowledge of Rome to comment on the historical accuracy the book does make me feel immersed in the period, which is the whole reason I love reading historical novels.


Victoria_Grossack Grossack (VictoriaGrossack) | 604 comments Well, although I obviously did not appreciate the book, let me say that I admire Kate's spirit and grace. I tip my hat to you, Kate!


message 15: by Teralyn (last edited Jul 20, 2011 09:59AM) (new)

Teralyn Pilgrim | 61 comments I'm 80 pages into it, and so far, I like Mistress of Rome better. I think it's because I liked Thea and Arius so much and I wanted them to get together so badly, whereas I'm not dying for the characters in this book to be happy.

I'm not saying every book has to start with characters slitting their wrists. I think it's because there's no question yet... do you know what I mean by that? I can't long for the characters to be happy because they aren't unhappy.

I'm right at the part when y'all said things would pick up, and I'm pretty excited about it!


message 16: by Teralyn (new)

Teralyn Pilgrim | 61 comments Kate, I have a question for you: out of the three books you wrote about Rome, which is your favorite?


message 17: by Kate (new)

Kate Quinn | 676 comments Teralyn wrote: "I'm not saying every book has to start with characters slitting their wrists. I think it's because there's no question yet... do you know what I mean by that?"

Yep, I get that. It was deliberate: Thea and Arius in Mistress of Rome start out on the bottom of the pile with absolutely nothing and have to claw their way up - with the girls in Daughters of Rome, I did it the other way around. They start out quite complacent; they have reasonably contented and easy lives, and they certainly have most of the prejudices and preconceptions that women of their class and experience would have (and some of those prejudices definitely won't endear them to a modern audience). But the Year of Four Emperors puts them all through the wringer; they go from the top to the bottom and have to rebuild everything - exactly the opposite from Thea and Arius. I didn't want to keep writing the same book about miserable put-upon slaves over and over; that would just get boring.


message 18: by Kate (new)

Kate Quinn | 676 comments Teralyn wrote: "Kate, I have a question for you: out of the three books you wrote about Rome, which is your favorite?"

That's a question with a fluctuating answer. Whatever book I'm currently writing is always my favorite - but only as long as I'm actually writing it. Once I start editing and re-editing and copyediting, I quickly go from love to burning hatred; I never want to see the book again and would happily drop it into a shredder. Hatred goes back to love once it's out of my hands for good. So currently, the upcoming Empress of the Seven Hills (Mistress of Rome's sequel) is my favorite. Once I start going through it line by line for copyediting, Daughters of Rome will become my favorite again.

Though I will say, I'm particularly fond of ESH for another reason: The hero, Vix, is quite a lot like my husband, who was on deployment for six months while I was writing the book. Working on ESH was a way to spend time with my husband even though he was on the other side of the globe.


message 19: by Judith (new)

Judith Starkston | 277 comments I'm only a little way in, but I think one of the things that may be catching up people about Daughters of Rome is that the reader right off the bat gets to know an array of 4 characters as "people to attend to and care about" and that means the reader's attention is a little scattered by design, and it takes more effort to invest in them all, especially because at this early point they don't all have pressing issues in their lives, as Kate pointed out. The book doesn't open with a central question that we're aware of yet because, I gather from Kate's comments, that will arise out of the challenging circumstances. The first part acts as introduction to characters rather than the burning "what will happen?". Does that seem accurate? I'm only a tiny way in. I like the smorgasbord effect, but it does do less immediate grabbing and holding. I'm also struck by how feminine the environment is, which is not the Rome most people are familiar with if they are familiar with Rome, and that may create a distance between expectation and what the reader finds in this book. Not that the women's world didn't exist, but it isn't what you read about in Cicero's letters, Vergil's epic or even Ovid's love poetry, so it takes some courage on Kate's part to imagine that world and take the pieces of historical detail that we do know about women and build them into this feminine feeling world.


message 20: by Anne (new)

Anne Ipsen | 109 comments I had never heard of either Mistress of Rome nor Daughters of Rome until I read that the latter was picked as a group read. I read MoR first because I thought it was the first in the sequence, but I'm glad I read in that order, because they both made sense that way. I think I prefer DoR -- the gladiator type has never appealed to me (I like my heros a little more cerebral) and the violence off-putting--yes, I know the times were like that, but I don't need the gory details. On the other had I found the poor-little-rich 'daughters' somewhat irritating. However, I finished and enjoyed both books, even if they are not my all-time favorites. It has been a while since I read about ancient Rome and the thorough research made them interesting.


message 21: by [deleted user] (new)

I was trying to decide whether or not I should read Mistress of Rome before Daughters of Rome. I thought someone made a comment about that somewhere, but looking back I couldn't find it.
What do you recommend?


message 22: by Zee (new)

Zee | 96 comments I read Daughters first, and I don't think I was hampered in any way by not having read Mistress.


message 23: by Teralyn (last edited Jul 21, 2011 09:12AM) (new)

Teralyn Pilgrim | 61 comments Kate wrote: ...in Daughters of Rome, I did it the other way around. They start out quite complacent; they have reasonably contented and easy lives...

That's a neat idea... a holistic view of Roman life. This is why I like talking with authors; often when I hear their intentions for a book, I get more into it. I also like that you don't want to write the same book twice. I definitely don't get the sense of "I've read this before" with DoR.

I can't imagine being married to Vix! Of course, I've only seen him as a kid; I'll bet as a man, he turns into a real stud.

One thing I like about your characters (Vix and Arius especially) is that they don't have to be perfect all the time, but you don't strain to make them flawed either, like some authors do. You have people who are all good, all bad, and EVERYTHING in between.


message 24: by Teralyn (new)

Teralyn Pilgrim | 61 comments BTW, Sex and the City was on last night and I got curious because of how you all compared it to DoR. I started to watch it. My husband came out and looked at the tv, looked at me, and said, "It's finally happened. You have submitted into liking Sex in the City." I threw him the remote and said, "No! I don't even know what's on! Change it, I don't care...."

That was sad, because I actually got into it. I might have to watch more episodes now.


message 25: by Hannah (last edited Jul 21, 2011 02:55PM) (new)

Hannah (harshmallow) | 390 comments I'm almost done with Daughters of Rome, but I took a little pause to start working on a drawing of Cornelia and Drusus Densus. I've been shipping those two like whoa since shorty after he was introduced into the story.

SPOILER

It's when Cornelia climbs out of Proculus' litter with a hickey on her neck, and she sees Densus. A very tense conversation happens not long afterwards. I just started, and here is what I have done so far. I need to decide what I'm going to do about Cornelia's clothes and Densus' armor. Of course, the characters belong to the very talented Kate Quinn! http://img36.imageshack.us/img36/9633...

And I agree what people said about the slower start in Daughters of Rome. In Mistress of Rome, the plot starts off at rocket speed. In Daughters of Rome, there was a lot of backstory and setup to get out of the way first. That's not necessarily a bad thing, but for this reason Daughters didn't grab me on page one like Mistress did.


message 26: by Zee (new)

Zee | 96 comments I LOVE it Hannah - Cornelia is almost exactly as I pictured her! Beautiful but pointy! I'm looking forward to seeing the finished piece, you're really talented.


message 27: by Theresa (new)

Theresa | 5 comments I have a question for Kate. I just finished chapter 1 so I'm not too far into this, but I was wondering about the place of divorce in Ancient Rome. The character getting married (Lollia?) already had 2 husbands before the story begins and some of the other characters hint that she will be divorced within a year. Who got the final say in a relationship about divorce? how did they work at that time?


message 28: by Hannah (new)

Hannah (harshmallow) | 390 comments Zee wrote: "I LOVE it Hannah - Cornelia is almost exactly as I pictured her! Beautiful but pointy! I'm looking forward to seeing the finished piece, you're really talented."

Aww, thanks! She's also supposed to be super pissed off at this moment. When I read that part, I imagined her as being on the verge of slapping Densus across the face. I'll post the finished piece soon!


message 29: by Kate (last edited Jul 22, 2011 10:53AM) (new)

Kate Quinn | 676 comments Theresa wrote: "I have a question for Kate. I just finished chapter 1 so I'm not too far into this, but I was wondering about the place of divorce in Ancient Rome."

Divorce in ancient Rome (at least early Imperial Rome) was far easier and more common than it is nowadays, especially for the upper classes. You didn't need a divorce lawyer to get rid of an unwanted spouse, or a ceremony, or a lot of paperwork: all you had to do was declare yourself divorced and move out. Either the husband or wife could announce the divorce - Roman matrons had a fair amount of independence, retaining property rights when they married and often even getting their dowry back if they left the marriage. With divorce so easy, marriage increasingly became a tool of alliance among rich and powerful families, contracted for expedient purposes and just as speedily dissolved if the alliance became undesirable.

Lollia, who is one of the richest heiresses in Rome and has powerful family connections, goes through multiple marriages before she even hits her twenties, and it's quite realistic. Rich and powerful Romans, both men and women, could quite commonly go through five or six marriages in the course of their lives, and not be thought at all out of the ordinary. Elizabeth Taylor would have fit right in . . . :D


message 30: by Kate (new)

Kate Quinn | 676 comments Hannah wrote: "I'm almost done with Daughters of Rome, but I took a little pause to start working on a drawing of Cornelia and Drusus Densus. I've been shipping those two like whoa since shorty after he was intro..."

And Hannah - your drawing is lovely. I can't draw anything more complicated than a matchstick figure so I am deeply impressed.


message 31: by Heather (new)

Heather (hsditto) Jennifer wrote: "I was trying to decide whether or not I should read Mistress of Rome before Daughters of Rome. I thought someone made a comment about that somewhere, but looking back I couldn't find it.
What do y..."


Hi Jennifer, I've read both books and I don't think it really matters which you choose to go with first. In DoR you do get a little bit of background on some of the characters that feature in MoR, so you may enjoy reading Daughters first. I know that I will be re-reading these books again at some point and will probably read DoR first next time around.


message 32: by Heather (new)

Heather (hsditto) Great drawings, Hannah! I look forward to seeing the finished product. :)

Theresa, I'm so glad you asked the question about divorce back then because I had been wondering the same thing. I was surprised by how it seemed so commonplace and like it wasn't a big deal. Thanks Kate for the info on that!


message 33: by Heather (new)

Heather (hsditto) I finished DoR last night and have to say I thoroughly enjoyed it. One of the things I love about Kate's books is how action-packed and exciting the stories are. Once they grab you, they don't let go! And the drama...all the juicy, wonderful drama...*blissful sigh* I absolutely love it! :)


message 34: by Judith (new)

Judith Starkston | 277 comments Kate, I have a question which is really silly but it's about a detail that gets mentioned several times and the historian in me was tickled by it. Where on earth did you find out that women (and men apparently) "varnished" their nails? Do we know what they used? I have read accounts of the elaborate make up and hairdos of Roman women, about women literally poisoning themselves unwittingly with their get ups, but this detail I've never come across. I'm enjoying your book very much. Lots of fun to read.


message 35: by [deleted user] (new)

Thanks for the advice...I'm starting with DoR very soon! Can't wait to read it =D


message 36: by Kate (new)

Kate Quinn | 676 comments Judith wrote: "Kate, I have a question which is really silly but it's about a detail that gets mentioned several times and the historian in me was tickled by it. Where on earth did you find out that women (and me..."

I took a bit of a leap of faith on nail varnish. I've found various recipes for early nail coloring, ascribed to different ancient cultures: one calls for gum arabic and beeswax; others for colored dyes from mashed flower petals or inks. We know that Cleopatra liked red nails, which were a sign of status in ancient Egypt. Some vague references to nail varnish or coloring are made about Roman women, and it's also known that rich Roman women imported a lot of beauty products and traditions from ancient Egypt which was more advanced in areas of haute couture. (Much like wealthy women today importing skin creams from Paris.) So I had my wealthier Roman women follow the Egyptian custom, which would have been expensive and trendy.


message 37: by Jackie, That's Her Constableness to you! (new)

Jackie (TheNightOwl) | 2839 comments Hannah, great drawing! I can't wait to see it when you're done.


message 38: by Jackie, That's Her Constableness to you! (new)

Jackie (TheNightOwl) | 2839 comments I finished this a little while ago and I'm still kind of letting it seep in. Although the beginning was slow by Part 2 I was hooked. I ended up giving it 4 stars.

Questions and comments regarding the Epilogue:
(view spoiler)


I can't wait to read about Vix and Sabrina. Those two were my faves in MoR.


message 39: by [deleted user] (new)

Yay!!!...finally cleared a path through my to-read obligations and I am starting DoR...woo hoo!


message 40: by Heather (new)

Heather (hsditto) Jackie, that's an interesting point you brought up about Marcella! (view spoiler)


message 41: by Kate (new)

Kate Quinn | 676 comments Jackie wrote: "I finished this a little while ago and I'm still kind of letting it seep in. Although the beginning was slow by Part 2 I was hooked. I ended up giving it 4 stars.

Questions and comments regarding..."



**SPOILER REGARDING TIMELINE AND EPILOGUE**

You're correct, Jackie - Vespasian reigned for ten years, starting at the very end of 69. I felt like I had to put his dates in, since I included the dates on the other three emperors. But twelve years actually pass between the last chapter and the epilogue, as you observed, because Vespasian's son Titus inherited the throne and ruled for two years before dying young and passing it on to Domitian. I thought about starting the epilogue with Titus's coronation so there was an unbroken line of emperors and no two-year gap, but I liked the symmetry of bringing everything full circle to where Marcella is Empress. Plus, technically, Mistress of Rome begins on that very same day with Thea and Lepida going to the coronation games, so I liked that as well.

Actually, for both books I was sorry that I couldn't get more into Emperor Titus. He was an interesting guy - had a famous Caesar-and-Cleopatra romance with Queen Berenice of Judaea, and also reportedly had an affair with Domitian's wife (Marcella). It would have been fun to explore that, but I just didn't have the room.

Thanks for all the comments, Jackie!


message 42: by Judith (new)

Judith Starkston | 277 comments Kate wrote: "Judith wrote: "Kate, I have a question which is really silly but it's about a detail that gets mentioned several times and the historian in me was tickled by it. Where on earth did you find out tha..."

Thank you! I knew beauty aids as well as medicine was often imported from Egypt, but I had no idea that nail "polish" had such an august history! Maybe I'm a wee bit crazy, but I find these details fascinating. Thanks for sharing the research background to this ancient fact.


message 43: by [deleted user] (new)

Jackie wrote: "I finished this a little while ago and I'm still kind of letting it seep in. Although the beginning was slow by Part 2 I was hooked. I ended up giving it 4 stars.

Questions and comments regarding..."


I agree with your spoiler comment about Marcella (view spoiler)
I liked the other girls, Diana, Cornelia and Lollia--I actually ended up liking her quite a bit, but I had a feeling through much of the book that they were all a little shallow and self-interested. I found Lollia's evolution throughout the story the most interesting, with Cornelia a close second.
I was surprised to learn that (view spoiler)

Kate, I was wondering if it was your intention to portray the women in DoR as shallow in the beginning because that would have been a realistic attitude to have in their society given their social status?
(I felt they were shallow and self-interested, but maybe I misinterpreted your intention?)
Also, Did you like one of the women more than the others or did that change as the story progressed and they evolved?


message 44: by Kate (new)

Kate Quinn | 676 comments Jennifer wrote: "Kate, I was wondering if it was your intention to portray the women in DoR as shallow in the beginning because that would have been a realistic attitude to have in their society given their social status?"

I wanted to portray the women realistically, given their social status and upbringing - and upper class Roman women had a number of attitudes that aren't very PC to us today. An acceptance of slavery, for example, and of arranged marriages, and viewing those of lesser social status as lesser citizens. It might be unpalatable, but it's true to their time; I wanted to make them real and not just 21st century feminists dropped down into ancient Rome full of politically correct opinions. So at the beginning, Cornelia is a bit of a prig, and Lollia is a spoiled girl who sees no problem in buying a slave just to have sex with, and maybe you won't like them so much. But all four girls change over the course of the year; they have experiences that force them to re-evaluate the values they grew up with. I didn't like Cornelia very much at the beginning, but liked her by the end. Marcella was the opposite.


message 45: by Judith (new)

Judith Starkston | 277 comments Kate, Do you find that your characters take off in directions you didn't intend for them? For example, did you expect to feel so "out of love" with Marcella by the end? D of R must have been particularly challenging that way if you find that happens with your characters because you had already published the book that chronologically comes after. I wondered how all that felt to you as you wrote. My characters seem to take on a life of their own and bully me if I try to ignore them!


message 46: by Jackie, That's Her Constableness to you! (new)

Jackie (TheNightOwl) | 2839 comments Kate, thanks for extra info on Titus! I don't know much about Rome other than the typical Anthony, Cleopatra, Julius Caesar stuff I've read. That's why I love HF because I learn new stuff, especially when I google right after reading. lol.

I know you have Vix and Sabrina's story coming up, but after that do you know what you're going to start working on? Do you plan on continuing with Rome or maybe have thought about branching out?


message 47: by Jackie, That's Her Constableness to you! (new)

Jackie (TheNightOwl) | 2839 comments Jennifer wrote: "I agree with your spoiler comment about Marcella"

OOhh yeah Jennifer, that Marcus commentary! (view spoiler)


message 48: by [deleted user] (last edited Jul 25, 2011 10:29AM) (new)

Kate wrote:... I didn't like Cornelia very much at the beginning, but liked her by the end. Marcella was the opposite. ..."

Exactly! And just for clarification, my dislike for certain characters didn't at all imply a dislike for the story. I actually think it's great when an author can write a good mix of both...those you love, those you hate and especially the ones that have the ability to change my opinion as the story progresses.
Here's my review:
http://www.goodreads.com/review/show/...

When I made the comment about the characters evolving throughout the story (maybe not as deeply as I would have liked, but still enough to hold my interest), I was really thinking about Diana. I liked her but I had a hard time really getting to know her because she seemed to be farther in the background than the other girls. I think I felt like there was a lot more to her than meets the eye and I wanted to know more! =D


@Jackie...I'm going to read MoR at some point. Hopefully soon. I would love to read more about Marcus.

@Judith, I'm not a writer at all, but as a reader sometimes I find myself thinking about certain characters in stories long after I've finished a book. I can't imagine the experience it must be as a writer...they're your creation (or adaptation in some cases of historical figures) and you get to breathe life into them. That's just coolbeans!


message 49: by Judith (last edited Jul 25, 2011 01:18PM) (new)

Judith Starkston | 277 comments Jennifer wrote: "Kate wrote:... I didn't like Cornelia very much at the beginning, but liked her by the end. Marcella was the opposite. ..."

Exactly! And just for clarification, my dislike for certain characters ..."


To Jennifer about characters--I sometimes imagine some other realm where all the characters in fiction are messing around just waiting to boss their authors around. When you try writing a scene in a way a character doesn't want it to be, woe to you! When I stop fighting the messages that I suppose are coming from my imagination direct, rather than all that cerebral processing messing in between, and let a character act as they wish, it all goes so much more smoothly. By the way, I do like the phrase "That's just coolbeans!" New to me and very lively!
Kate has certainly created some characters that take on lives of their own.


message 50: by Teralyn (new)

Teralyn Pilgrim | 61 comments Judith - Do you write historical fiction? I've found personally that I can't let my characters do whatever they want in hist fics, though they can in mainstreams, because hist fics have to be so structured. I have to plan out the events and the culture, which usually already exist, and inevitably have to plan out the characters as well. What do you think about that?

I look forward to hearing Kate's take on this as well.


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Books mentioned in this topic

Mistress of Rome (other topics)
Empress of the Seven Hills (other topics)
Daughters of Rome (other topics)
The Hero and the Crown (other topics)
Mistress of Rome (other topics)
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Authors mentioned in this topic

Robin McKinley (other topics)