Bright Young Things discussion

31 views
Group Reads Archive > The Perfect Summer by Juliet Nicolson




Comments (showing 1-30)    post a comment »
dateUp arrow    newest »

message 30: by Ally (new)

Ally (goodreadscomuser_allhug) | 1437 comments Mod
No, I think that's fair to some degree. There was a lot of media 'undermining' of the women fighting for the franchise and the term did start out as an insult to belittle both the women and their cause.

The ascent of women suggests that the suffragists were the non-militant part of the movement but as the cause became increasingly more agressive in its tactics there were splits in the movement. Suffragettes is probably a fair term to describe those very radical activists. The women who identified as suffragists tried to distance themselves from the suffragettes tactics as they felt it undermined the cause.

I may be completely wrong but that's the sense of the terms I'm getting from what I'm reading at the moment.


message 29: by Jan C (new)

Jan C (woeisme) | 1117 comments Ally wrote: "For anyone who is interested this was the discussion thread mentioned in our nominations thread.

I think this will make a perfect follow on read to this month's non-fiction choice [book:The Ascent..."
I've already learned the difference between the suffragist and suffragette arms of the fight for the frachise!


So what is it? I'd always heard that the name the women used was suffragist. But that the newspapers used the more derogatory term of suffragette.

Have I been living under a cloud?


message 28: by Ally (last edited Mar 09, 2012 12:11PM) (new)

Ally (goodreadscomuser_allhug) | 1437 comments Mod
For anyone who is interested this was the discussion thread mentioned in our nominations thread.

I think this will make a perfect follow on read to this month's non-fiction choice The Ascent of Woman: A History of the Suffragette Movement and the Ideas Behind It - I've already learned the difference between the suffragist and suffragette arms of the fight for the frachise!


message 27: by Ellen (new)

Ellen | 96 comments Joe wrote: "Great ..Thank You. I will add then to my "To Read" List"

Cool beans. I hope you enjoy them!


message 26: by Joe (new)

Joe Great ..Thank You. I will add then to my "To Read" List


message 25: by Ellen (new)

Ellen | 96 comments Joe wrote: "OC Deepdiver here . All things 1900-1940s England . Read this one last year and thought it very very good. Certainly was a hot summer for the Brits ( nothing near as bad as it gets here in Arkansas..."

Yes, I knew this about Nicholson. And she has written some wonderful books; I think I've read nearly all of them. Also carrying on the creative tradition is Vanessa Bell's grand-daughter, Virginia Nicholson. She's written some excellent reads:

http://www.goodreads.com/book/show/70...
http://www.goodreads.com/book/show/10...
http://www.goodreads.com/book/show/11...
http://www.goodreads.com/book/show/75...

The genes prevail, I guess! ;o)


message 24: by Joe (new)

Joe OC Deepdiver here . All things 1900-1940s England . Read this one last year and thought it very very good. Certainly was a hot summer for the Brits ( nothing near as bad as it gets here in Arkansas)but uncomfortable to be sure. Recommend this book if your into early c1900s England . btw ,if you weren't aware Juliet Nicholson is Vita Sackville Wests Grand Daughter. Looks like she is keeping the family writing trend going.


message 23: by Anna (new)

Anna Elliott | 30 comments I finished this book last night. Somehow, it didn't really do it for me and I thought it was fairly average. There were some interesting bits in it but it just didn't grab my imagination.

Looking forward to reading the book about Agatha Christie for next months read now.


message 22: by Ellen (new)

Ellen | 96 comments Jill wrote: "I'm going to refer you to my review since I think it pretty much describes my feelings about the book. I liked it better than The Perfect Summer: England 1911, Just Before the Storm an..."

I understand now, Jill. I can see how "The Perfect Summer" might have been really unexciting after "Just Before the Storm". I think I'm grateful I didn't read these books in historical order! Thanks again!


message 21: by Jill (last edited Jul 17, 2011 05:11PM) (new)

Jill Hutchinson (Bucs1960) | 249 comments I'm going to refer you to my review since I think it pretty much describes my feelings about the book. I liked it better than The Perfect Summer: England 1911, Just Before the Storm and thought it was well written and affecting.

http://www.goodreads.com/book/show/71...


message 20: by Ellen (new)

Ellen | 96 comments Jill wrote: "Ellen wrote: "Anna wrote: "I'm really enjoying the section of the book about the butler. It's making a welcome change to the 'rich at play' aspect that most of this book has taken. I've found tha..."

Wow, you must be psychic, Jill! I just bought this book from Amazon in the hardcover format. Definitely looking forward to reading it, too. In what way did you find it "moving"? In comparison with "The Perfect Summer", would you say it's as readable and written in the same lucid style? Thanks so much!


message 19: by Jill (new)

Jill Hutchinson (Bucs1960) | 249 comments Ellen wrote: "Anna wrote: "I'm really enjoying the section of the book about the butler. It's making a welcome change to the 'rich at play' aspect that most of this book has taken. I've found that part of the ..."

You might want to try:

The Great Silence: 1918-1920 Living in the Shadow of the Great War by Nicolson. It is very moving.


message 18: by Ellen (new)

Ellen | 96 comments Anna wrote: "I'm really enjoying the section of the book about the butler. It's making a welcome change to the 'rich at play' aspect that most of this book has taken. I've found that part of the book quite re..."

Anna, I really had fun reading that scene with the butler! And although Nicholson might tell us the same idea more than once I thought that the context in which she repeated the information added something more that I'd not seen before. I've finished the book, and all in all thought Nicholson portrayed the decade in an interesting way. I am going to read her other books as well, one of which I own but cannot recall its title right now. Thanks so much!


message 17: by Anna (new)

Anna Elliott | 30 comments I'm really enjoying the section of the book about the butler. It's making a welcome change to the 'rich at play' aspect that most of this book has taken. I've found that part of the book quite repetitive. I've felt like she's told us the same thing in several different ways. Although, she's made the occasinal refernce to how the sweltering heat has affected the working man, the focus has been on it's effect of 'society'.


message 16: by Ellen (new)

Ellen | 96 comments Jan C wrote: "Well, I suppose it all depends on what you want to think goes on in a hotel's restaurant's kitchen. Dishes don't wash themselves and entrees don't cook themselves. Nor do they serve themselves.

..."


Thanks, Jan. I think I'll see about getting a copy of the Simenon book from the library; I like mysteries!! Have a great rest of the week!


message 15: by Jan C (new)

Jan C (woeisme) | 1117 comments Well, I suppose it all depends on what you want to think goes on in a hotel's restaurant's kitchen. Dishes don't wash themselves and entrees don't cook themselves. Nor do they serve themselves.

The Simenon book is a mystery.


message 14: by Ellen (new)

Ellen | 96 comments Jan C wrote: "Anna wrote: "I really like George Orwell's books but have never got around to Down and Out in Paris and London. I really must get around to it one of these days."

I was reminded of ..."


I've not read Simenon's book yet, but from the sound of your description I probably don't wish to either, right? ;o)


message 13: by Jan C (new)

Jan C (woeisme) | 1117 comments Anna wrote: "I really like George Orwell's books but have never got around to Down and Out in Paris and London. I really must get around to it one of these days."

I was reminded of it recently when I read Georges Simenon's The Hotel Majestic. Both bear depictions of the underside of Paris hotel kitchens.


message 12: by Anna (new)

Anna Elliott | 30 comments I really like George Orwell's books but have never got around to Down and Out in Paris and London. I really must get around to it one of these days.


message 11: by Jan C (new)

Jan C (woeisme) | 1117 comments Ellen wrote: "Anna wrote: "I was very interested and amused at how 'the loo' got it's name.

I'm hanging in there Ellen. I'm far too stubborn to give up yet :)"

LOL! Good for you, Anna! I know what you mean - ..."


I really enjoyed Down and Out in Paris and London. I think I liked the Paris part better than the London part. But I thought both were interesting. And I know that I never want to be that poor.


message 10: by Ellen (new)

Ellen | 96 comments Anna wrote: "I was very interested and amused at how 'the loo' got it's name.

I'm hanging in there Ellen. I'm far too stubborn to give up yet :)"


LOL! Good for you, Anna! I know what you mean - it takes a lot for me to quit a book before I finish it. That happened recently with Orwell's "Down and Out in Paris and London". What a downer of a book! Thanks so much!


message 9: by Anna (new)

Anna Elliott | 30 comments I was very interested and amused at how 'the loo' got it's name.

I'm hanging in there Ellen. I'm far too stubborn to give up yet :)


message 8: by Ellen (new)

Ellen | 96 comments Anna wrote: "Well, I'm a couple of chapters in and there's been some interesting stuff. I thought the chapter on Queen Mary was rather interesting and also the insight into the young Churchill. I can't say th..."

I rather struggled with the first part of the book, too, but Anna, it gets much better once you get through the first chapter. Hang in there and continue reading and I think you'll agree. Thanks for commenting!


message 7: by Anna (new)

Anna Elliott | 30 comments Well, I'm a couple of chapters in and there's been some interesting stuff. I thought the chapter on Queen Mary was rather interesting and also the insight into the young Churchill. I can't say the writing has really grabbed me yet but maybe I'm being a bit premature. I'll keep reading and see.


message 6: by Ally (new)

Ally (goodreadscomuser_allhug) | 1437 comments Mod
I haven't yet started this either but I intend to pick it up next week. Please don't worry about being behind we all read at our own speed!


message 5: by Jan C (new)

Jan C (woeisme) | 1117 comments Anna - I wouldn't worry about it. As noted, I came on vacation without it so I won't really get to it until next week.


message 4: by Anna (new)

Anna Elliott | 30 comments I've only just picked up my copy of this today so my reading will be running a bit behind the rest of you. Looking forward to discussing it soon as it looks like such an interesting book.


message 3: by SarahC (new)

SarahC (SarahCarmack) | 9 comments I have read very little in the book yet, but do plan to join in the discussion. Jan, I agree with your concern over this phrase, but I haven't seen yet what her actual treatment of the subject is, so I can't comment on it yet at this time. Hopefully, I will back soon into the discussion.


message 2: by Jan C (new)

Jan C (woeisme) | 1117 comments I got kind of disappointed early on in this book. It is a small thing but one which always grates with me. This is whether an author uses "suffragist" versus the pejorative "suffragette". One was the term used to describe themselves and the other was the insulting term hung on them by the newspapers.

It would have to be early on, I'm not very far in the book. And I forgot to bring it with me on vacation.


message 1: by Ally (new)

Ally (goodreadscomuser_allhug) | 1437 comments Mod
Please use this thread to discuss as you read...

The Perfect Summer  England 1911, Just Before the Storm by Juliet NicolsonThe Perfect Summer: England 1911, Just Before the Storm by Juliet Nicolson Juliet Nicolson

(...please note that as the multiple threads for section-by-section reading have not been used over the last few months I am reverting to just one discussion thread for each of our monthly group reads. - If anyone feels very strongly that multiple section threads should be re-instated please let me know)


back to top
unread topics | mark unread


Books mentioned in this topic

The Perfect Summer: England 1911, Just Before the Storm (other topics)
Down and Out in Paris and London (other topics)
The Great Silence (other topics)
The Ascent of Woman: A History of the Suffragette Movement and the Ideas Behind It (other topics)
More...

Authors mentioned in this topic

Juliet Nicolson (other topics)