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What did you read last month? > What I read in June 2011

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Lynda Ballam | 41 comments Alias Reader wrote: "Lynda wrote: "Thank you Alias Reader for telling me how to put my books into link mode. I knew somebody would! As I have just started reading The Help, I should investigate the Monthly Book Select..."

Now don't rush me! I have spotted the FAQ's and will give them due consideration.


message 102: by Alias Reader (last edited Jul 25, 2011 11:00PM) (new)

Alias Reader (AliasReader) | 8229 comments :) It's just a Folder we made up when we moved to GR from our long time home on AOL. Since GR doesn't have any sort of guide to help newbies, we all had a million questions. We had to figure it all out by trial and error. I decided to have a Q & A Folder to help those new to GR. Let me tell you, it was a a hassle to try and figure out how things worked on GR.


Madrano (madran) | 3118 comments Well, i was almost missing AOL over the weekend when i couldn't access this board! I'm glad to see that finally, at the end of the 3rd day we can communicate. If you find that someone hasn't replied to your post, you may want to reask the question. I know i replied to several posts before realizing they weren't getting posted!

deb


Robert T.  Garcia (rtgarcia17) I have several books that I am working on. First is the new James Bond Novel by Jeffery Deaver, carte blanche. The second novel is Star Wars: Old Republic: Deceived and this book I am reading on my new Nook 2nd edition. I love the new E-reader. I look forward to continue adding more books.
At the end of this month I will be receiving the latest Brad Thor novel: Black List.


Maree  ♫ Light's Shadow ♪ I've heard the battery life on the new Nook is amazing, Robert. But does it really last for two months on one charge?


Alias Reader (AliasReader) | 8229 comments Madrano wrote:If you find that someone hasn't replied to your post, you may want to reask the question. I know i replied to several posts before realizing they weren't getting posted! "
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I'm also having issues with my Internet and or computer. So If I don't respond it is because of that.


message 107: by Eve (new)

Eve (MizzEve) | 1 comments The Daughters of Juarez: A True Story of Serial Murder South of the Border Straightforward true crime reporting. The portrayal of Mexican government corruption and sexism is palpable.

The Last Child Good novel that kept me guessing through most of the story. But why do some authors feel the need to offset their young white protagonist with a crazy black person? That plot tool is so last century...


message 108: by Alias Reader (last edited Jul 12, 2011 09:27PM) (new)

Alias Reader (AliasReader) | 8229 comments Eve wrote: "The Daughters of Juarez: A True Story of Serial Murder South of the Border Straightforward true crime reporting. The portrayal of Mexican government corruption and sexism is palpable..."

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Welcome to BNC, Eve ! Thanks so much for sharing your June reads with us. Sounds like you read two interesting books.


Madrano (madran) | 3118 comments Eve wrote: "The Daughters of Juarez: A True Story of Serial Murder South of the Border Straightforward true crime reporting. The portrayal of Mexican government corruption and sexism is palpable..."

First of all, Eve, welcome to Book Nook Cafe!

Secondly, thank you for the title. Last week we watched the film Backyard, which is similar to what the book you mentioned covers. This review explains some of the hassles the film's makers experienced while filming in Juarez, http://twitchfilm.com/reviews/2010/01... . The movie kept us watching but we just kept asking ourselves if this could be true.

Then, it closed with worldwide statistics, which were stunning. There may have been too many numbers but it served a point. This isn't a "case" which is just going to go away. The numbers of what is called femicide are stunning but i know people who are comparing them to the numbers killed as a result of the Mexican President's war of drug cartels & guess which gets the Big Publicity?

The film tied the murders with outsourcing jobs, in the sense that politicians had too much on their hands already! The dysfunction appeared overwhelming. I wondered if a book about this topic existed and am glad to see the title you shared.

deb


Elaine Langer | 125 comments Madrano wrote: "Eve wrote: "The Daughters of Juarez: A True Story of Serial Murder South of the Border Straightforward true crime reporting. The portrayal of Mexican government corruption and sexism..."


I been reading Amexica: War Along the Borderline for about 6 months now (I keep putting it down but am determined to finish). It is depressing. Its focus is on the border towns (America and Mexican) and I am also stunned by the numbers of well everyone that is murdered. I have to put it down of the shock of it. I think definetly the dysfunction is overwhelming.


Madrano (madran) | 3118 comments I like that title, Elaine. I see this book also mentions the murders of women in Juarez. It's incredible and disheartening. We've heard much about the drug connected murders, but so very little about the deaths of so many young women.

deb


message 112: by Maicie (last edited Jul 17, 2011 10:53AM) (new)

Maicie | 25 comments This might become my favorite folder. What a great way to find new books. My June reads:

Dark Places by Gillian Flynn4 Stars. Libby's mom and two sisters are murdered. She escapes the house and tells the police her 15-year-old brother is the killer. Years later, Libby is contacted by the Kill Club, a group of people with a fascination for notorious crimes. The members are convinced her brother is innocent and will pay down-on-her luck Libby to reconstruct the crime.

There is not a single likable character in the entire book but that only adds to this darkish novel.

Water for Elephants by Sara Gruen. 4 stars. I reread this for my f2f group. I abhor the circus and the author does a good job reminding my why.

Breakfast at Tiffany's by Truman Capote. 5 stars. (Red-faced) I'm an idiot. I though Capote wrote two books; Breakfast at Tiffany's and In Cold Blood: A True Account of a Multiple Murder and Its Consequences. He's written quite a bit more and I've missed out on some darn good reading. My copy of Tiffany's also contained House Of Flowers, A Diamond Guitar and A Christmas Memory; all good with a touch of darkness that I admire and appreciate.

Dark Mountain by Richard Laymon. 2 miserable stars. If you don't have anything nice to say, don't say anything at all.




Sweeney Todd  The Demon Barber of Fleet Street by Robert L. Mack 5 stars. I couldn't wait to polish off (pun intended) this novel. Loved the movie, adored the book.


In the Miso Soup by Ryū Murakami 4 stars. Loved everything but the ending...which I didn't get. Oh well.


You Believers by Jane Bradley. 5 stars. I took this on a camping trip and lost an entire day of fishing to finish the book. That's a high recommendation.

A loved one goes missing. What is more terrifying?

Brain Child by John Saul2 1/2 stars. Not a favorite


JoAnn/QuAppelle | 712 comments Maicie, I dislike the circus too, and do not like books set in the time period of Water for Elephants. So why did I even read this book? I ended up liking it, though!


Alias Reader (AliasReader) | 8229 comments Maicie wrote: "This might become my favorite folder. What a great way to find new books. My June reads:

=================

Maicie, thanks for sharing your June reads with us.

I liked reading your reviews.

As to Truman Capote, back in December or 2001 Modern Library came out with a lovely little book in time for the holidays. It contained 3 stories, that were just a delight to read. One could really see his talent.

~ A Christmas Memory (which you've read)
~ One Christmas
~ The Thanksgiving Visitor

Christmas Memory, One Christmas, & The Thanksgiving Visitor


Susan (Nutz4Books) | 236 comments Great list, Maicie, and nice, helpful, succinct descriptions -- something I seem incapable of doing.

I agree whole-heartedly with you and JoAnn about the circus. I was surprised to find I enjoyed Water for Elephants. I have no intention of seeing the movie, though. I don't like movies with trained animals that should be living their own lives, not entertaining me.

Oh dear, I've managed to climb back on my soapbox, haven't I?


Maicie | 25 comments Susan wrote: "Great list, Maicie, and nice, helpful, succinct descriptions -- something I seem incapable of doing.

I agree whole-heartedly with you and JoAnn about the circus. I was surprised to find I enjoyed..."


You know, I never even thought about the animals they use in movies. Good point.


Elaine Langer | 125 comments Maicie wrote: "This might become my favorite folder...>

I agree, every months end, my TR list increases exponentially due to this folder



message 118: by Mikela (last edited Jul 18, 2011 08:40PM) (new)

Mikela I'm new to the Book Nook so hope that this is what you're looking for here.

The Black Dahlia-gave it 4*s but part of me wanted to give it 5. A really good read.
Dr. Jekyll and Mr. Hyde-gave it 4*s
The Little Country-gave 4*s to this urban fantasy
A Long Way Gone: Memoirs of a Boy Soldier-gave it 5*s
The Face-gave it 3*s
The Sweetness at the Bottom of the Pie-gave it 3*s
Bad Luck And Trouble-3*s
The Remains of the Day-3*s
Siddhartha-4*s
Never Let Me Go-4*s
The Wind-Up Bird Chronicle-5*s
Memory and Dream-4*s
Sweetness in the Belly-4*s
Fingersmith-3*s

That's it for my June reading. Oops forgot one
I Am the Messenger-gave it 4*s


Maicie | 25 comments Maree wrote: "Okay, so before everyone flips out, remember I was on vacation for half the month and at least half of these are YA reads, which means quick reads for the most part.

[bookcover:Among Others|870618..."


Maree, can you tell me how to do the "My Review" link? Thanks.


Alias Reader (AliasReader) | 8229 comments Mikela wrote: "I'm new to the Book Nook so hope that this is what you're looking for here.

The Black Dahlia-gave it 4*s but part of me wanted to give it 5. A really good read.
[book:Dr. Jekyll a..."

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Welcome to Book Nook Cafe, Mikela ! And thank you for sharing your June reads with us.

It looks like you had a very nice reading month. It was an eclectic list.


Madrano (madran) | 3118 comments Hi, Mikela, welcome to the group. Thanks for sharing your list--you are a busy reader. You'll fit right in here!

deb


Maree  ♫ Light's Shadow ♪ Hey Maicie, it's a little complicated so I'll send you a note.

Great list, Mikela! What do you think of Ishiguro in general after reading two of his books?


Mikela Thank you for welcoming me into your group. The two Ishiguro books are both excellent reads. While Remains of the Day is the story of a self-repressed English butler whos sees his value and worth in how well he represses his own feelings, needs and wants in deference to the comfort and needs of his employer. In Never Let Me Go, the children are brought up in a "boarding school" atmosphere where their identities and worth are based on how many and what quality donations they make. This is in preparation for the ultimate donations they were raised to make. Although different both books deal with allowing others to define the purpose of your life and how you become a willing partner. This author is amazingly insightful and I would recommend him to anyone.


Madrano (madran) | 3118 comments Good comment, Mikela, on Kazuo Ishiguro. I think his meticulous writing is what makes his work insightful. It's clear prose and he shares it wonderfully. I've only read the two you mentioned but they were different from one another yet left me with the same impression.

deborah


Maree  ♫ Light's Shadow ♪ Yeah, I've read both books, and while I adored Never Let Me Go, I didn't like Remains of the Day as much. The heartbreaking thing about Ishiguro for me is always his characters and how they just accept the way things are and don't strive for more than their stations.


Mikela Maree, I think that is very common in real life as well. We are all indoctrinated to a degree and accept certain "truths" that we have been taught. IMHO The butler did strive to be better, his focus was always on how to be a better servant. How does that differ from people today who get into a job or profession and what they strive for. I think his books are so wonderful because they are so real.


Mikela Eve wrote: "The Daughters of Juarez: A True Story of Serial Murder South of the Border Straightforward true crime reporting. The portrayal of Mexican government corruption and sexism is palpable..."

The Daughters of Juarez looks so interesting that I had to add it to my "look for" list. When I lived in Mexico my neighbour was a federale and he was telling me that when they went on raids they all wore masks so they couldn't be identified. In the prior year 15 of them had been decapitated by drug cartels. The people of Mexico are so poor that to many of them selling or producing drugs are their best means of livlihood. Americans who buy those drugs are so much of the problem.


Madrano (madran) | 3118 comments Mikela wrote: "When I lived in Mexico my neighbour was a federale and he was telling me that when they went on raids they all wore masks so they couldn't be identified...."

What a sad & profound choice they must make. Can you imagine the hoopla in the press when the lawyer of a person arrested by a masked officer called them on it? Oh my!

I fully agree with your final sentence, Mikela. This is why any war on drugs which focuses beyond our borders is going to be unsuccessful, in my opinion. How many years before our elected representatives let that sink in and take action on this understanding?

deb


message 129: by Madrano (last edited Jul 22, 2011 06:43AM) (new)

Madrano (madran) | 3118 comments Maree wrote: " The heartbreaking thing about Ishiguro for me is always his characters and how they just accept the way things are and don't strive for more than their stations. ..."

Mikela replied to this in the same way i would. I think his characters are more reflective of real life. Our literature and other entertainment are full of examples which exemplify the opposite, those thriving despite what is expected of them. This is what makes the story worth telling. So, i like that Ishiguro tells the stories of those who do not. One interesting aspect is that he does it with science fiction, too. In a way this illustrates that we are unlikely to change, in his opinion.

deborah


Meredith | 55 comments My June reads

I, Alex Cross by James Patterson
raating 3/5
Although as in most of his books, the situations are a bit improbable, the relationships within the Cross family are like visiting old friends

Mohawk byRichard Russo

Rating 5/5
This was Russo's first novel. As in all the other Russo books I have read, the characters, locations and situations are vividly described and believable

Blackwork byMonica Ferris

Rating 2+/5

This is a cozy mystery. I figuted out the killer early on, however, I enjoy the characters and it was a quick and easy read

Meredith


Alias Reader (AliasReader) | 8229 comments Nice reading month, Meredith. Thanks for sharing.

The Russo I have on my TBR pile is The Risk Pool


Sarah (SarahReader) | 68 comments Some recent reading. I do not keep careful notes on my reading, and I don’t often put public reviews on GR. However, I’ve been doing some interesting reading recently, and wanted to share some titles.

A Visit from the Goon Squad, Jennifer Egan. 5. This is an intriguing puzzle about relationships (family, work, friendship) and the passage of time. The major characters are a record producer (former headbanger-R&R band member), and his assistant, a young woman who has difficulty finding her way in life. We see them at many stages of their lives, along with their friends and colleagues. It is not an “easy” read. Jennifer Egan got her start with short stories, and this is one of those books that slips forward and backward in time, with different points of view and apparently miscellaneous events from a variety of loosely-connected characters. There have been a lot of books of this genre recently, such as Olive Kitteredge and the one about NYC on the day that Philippe Pettit walked between the towers (Let the Great World Spin?). I know that several readers here greatly dislike a book that doesn’t have a narrative arc and meaningful chronology. But I have to say that I loved this one, and I felt greatly rewarded for sticking with it. Along with the changing POV come changing styles and formats. One of the richest, deepest sections is actually a powerpoint written by a young girl. I know, I know . . . I was dubious too. But it was really exciting to see how the graphic arrangement of words on the page could be as eloquent as traditional prose.

Donna Leon’s series of mystery/crime novels set in Venice, Italy. 4. I didn’t know Leon, but I read half a dozen of these recently as preparation for a trip to Venice. They are very well done, talking about contemporary life in modern-day Venice. I got a very visceral, sensory image of the sights and sounds of walking around this amazing town from the perspective of a native. Yet the novels provided worlds of insight for a tourist. Leon’s detective is a guy named Brunetti, a solid, decent person blessed with an interesting family life and an intelligent perspective. The crime issues and solutions were not especially elegant (from a crime perspective, that is), but they seemed realistic and challenging enough for me.

Faith, by Jennifer Haigh. “Faith” could also have been titled “Doubt.” This is another novel about the cataclysm in the Catholic Church caused by the revelation of so much pedophilia by priests over too many years, and the shameful lack of response by the church authorities. Haigh did a good job of creating complex characters, and trying to analyze how our sense of love and loyalty affects perception and belief. I thought this was stronger than her earlier novel, The Condition. Her narrator is a sister (biological, not a nun) of an accused priest. It’s an interesting choice of narrator, and the novel is really as much a story about family relationships, trust and denial, as it is about the criminal issues.

Please Look After Mom, by Kyung-sook Shin. 4.
An elderly, confused woman gets separated from her husband while taking the train to Seoul to visit their children, and is lost in the city. This is such an interesting book by a noted South Korean author, available in translation in English for the first time. I think we'll see more of her work. I learned a lot about contemporary Korea and recent Korean history, and was thoroughly caught up in the family saga and history. It's a melancholy book in many ways, a kind of fugue of nostalgia and memory (and guilt, don't forget the guilt) about changes in the family and in the Korean way of life.

Upcoming reading (Buddy reads, anyone?):
Midnight’s Children, Salman Rushdie
Freedom, Frantzen
Unbroken, Hilliard
Warmth of Other Suns, Wilkerson
State of Wonder, Pachett
In the Garden of Beasts, Larson
Caleb’s Crossing, Brooks
Tabloid City, Hamill
Bossypants, Tina Fey


JoAnn/QuAppelle | 712 comments Sarah, are you visiting any other places in Italy (besides Venice)?


message 134: by Alias Reader (last edited Jul 25, 2011 10:59PM) (new)

Alias Reader (AliasReader) | 8229 comments Sarah wrote: "Donna Leon’s series of mystery/crime novels set in Venice, Italy. 4.
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Thanks so much for sharing, Sarah. I really enjoyed reading your reviews.

How exciting that you are going to Italy ! I hope you tell us about it when you get back.


I've never heard of Donna Leon but I will check her out on Amazon.

Her GR bio notes that her books have been translated in to many languages, but upon her request not Italian.

Odd.

I think I will try out the first in the series
Death at La Fenice (Commissario Brunetti #1)

An author that I like that writes about Italy is
Tim Parks
Two of my favorites of his are:

Italian Neighbors
Italian Education

From your list I've read
Freedom, Frantzen
Unbroken, Hilliard
I thought both were quite good.

In case you missed it we are reading Larson's other book in Sept.
The Devil in the White City: Murder, Magic, and Madness at the Fair that Changed America~Erik Larson


Alias Reader (AliasReader) | 8229 comments Wow ! Excellent reading month, Jenna.


JoAnn/QuAppelle | 712 comments Jenna wrote: "Things Fall Apart 3 stars.."

Someone gave me this a few months ago. I guess it was considered groundbreaking in its day


Alias Reader (AliasReader) | 8229 comments JoAnn/QuAppelle wrote: "Jenna wrote: "Things Fall Apart 3 stars.."

Someone gave me this a few months ago. I guess it was considered groundbreaking in its day"

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I know it is considered a modern classic. But I found it difficult to understand and I didn't care for the story. I wasn't a fan. Sorry.


JoAnn/QuAppelle | 712 comments Jenna, I read the first few pages of Things Fall Apart and "put it aside for another day"....which may never arrive! It certainly did not grab me. I find that I am very picky about novels that take place in Africa.


Marialyce Jenna, I have read some of your books and really think you nailed the ratings well. Loved Pillars, Sill Alice (just read her new one Left Neglected) The Hunger Games I really liked a bit more than you, Never Let Me Go was so sad...Did you see the movie? ...and am reading The Devil in the White City now...fascinating for sure.

I was not a fan of The Goon Squad one though....The Imperfectionists is the Sept read for my f2f book club.


Katz Nancy from NJ (Nancyk18) I read or listenend to the following during the month of June:

The Midwife's Confession by Diane Chamberlain C
The Bride's House by Sandra Dallas C
Secrets She Left Behind by Diane Chamberlain C
The Good Daughters by Joyce Maynard B
The Ambersham Rubies by Rhys Bowen B
House of Dark Shadows by Liparulo B
Story of Us by Susan Wiggs B
The Wicked House of Rowan C

Not a month filled with great reads but July was better.


Alias Reader (AliasReader) | 8229 comments Thanks for sharing your June reads with us, Nancy.
Sorry June wasn't a great reading month for you.

However, I am glad to hear July was better.


JoAnn/QuAppelle | 712 comments Marialyce wrote: "Jenna, I have read some of your books and really think you nailed the ratings well. Loved Pillars, Sill Alice (just read her new one Left Neglected) "

Genova is excellent at what she does. I would like to make Left Neglected compulsory reading for teens before they get their drivers' licenses. I see so many kids texting while driving. It is frightening.


Madrano (madran) | 3118 comments JoAnn/QuAppelle wrote: "Jenna, I read the first few pages of Things Fall Apart and "put it aside for another day"....which may never arrive! It certainly did not grab me. I find that I am very picky about novels that take place in Africa ..."

I read & liked Things Fall Apart, primarily because i thought it seemed an authentic way of viewing life from a tribal vantage. I haven't read many books by native/tribe members but i have enjoyed them for the unique perspective and/or the mythological insights. My own bottom line is that i would rather read a novel about black Africans written by black Africans. Of course, this is true (for me) of all countries and continents, really.

deborah, fondly remembering being baffled when i read My Life in the Bush of Ghosts


Meredith | 55 comments Sarah wrote: "Some recent reading. I do not keep careful notes on my reading, and I don’t often put public reviews on GR. However, I’ve been doing some interesting reading recently, and wanted to share some ti..."

Sarah,

I discovered the Donna Leon series several years ago and have enjoyed the book in the series that I have read. I am anal about reading series in order, so I am slowly making my way through the books.

A friend at work gave me the first book in late in the year several years go. I read it and gave it to my sister. She enjoyed it. That christmas, we both gave each other the rest of the books in the series that were published then

Meredith


Shomeret | 125 comments Maicie wrote: "Susan wrote: "Great list, Maicie, and nice, helpful, succinct descriptions -- something I seem incapable of doing.

I agree whole-heartedly with you and JoAnn about the circus. I was surprised t..."


I agree about training animals. That bothers me too. My circus novel interests are human centered. I love the aerial acts and how "freaks" find a home and a community in the circus. In RL, I only go to see circuses without animals.


JoAnn/QuAppelle | 712 comments There was an excellent multi-part series/documentary on PBS about the Big Apple Circus. It focused on the lives of the employees and the acts. You may still be able to view it online. Well worth watching. Remember, I have NO interest in circuses!


Robert T.  Garcia (rtgarcia17) On Tuesday, I downloaded Brad Thor's latest thriller, Full Black. A nice brisk story, about 379 pages of fun. The story was sooooo good that today, 30 July 11, Saturday I had finished this story.
Loved it on my new 2nd Nook. Best e-reader hands down. Now I must seek out another tome or novel to conquer in my quest of the everlasting summer reading fun.
This is 10th thriller that Brad Thor has written and each book gets better and better.
Cheers.


message 149: by Madrano (last edited Aug 01, 2011 06:12AM) (new)

Madrano (madran) | 3118 comments EDITED: Well CRAP! I did it AGAIN! This should be in July, not June. I'll try moving it, the figuring out (AGAIN!) how to link to GR. Seriously, if i do this again next month, i may SCREAM!)

YET ANOTHER EDIT! I see that part of my confusion is because people are still adding their June list. No wonder i was confused. Not that this excuses TWO months in a row, of course, but it helps ease my mind.

My reading slowed down this month, partly because i got hung up on Stand Facing the Stove: The Story of the Women Who Gave America The Joy of Cooking, which i still haven't finished. I am liking it but it's too long for summer reading, imo. It'll go on next month's list. Meanwhile...

The Case of the Missing Servant by Tarquin Hall was mentioned on this board months ago. It sounded intriguing, even though i know little about India. The author generously included a glossary at the end of the book but i was flipping back there so often, that it made reading tedious, so i stopped. While i don't think i missed a thing, neither the characters nor the writing were good enough to want to read more in the series. Not bad, just far from worth my time investment.

Here's Looking at Euclid: A Surprising Excursion Through the Astonishing World of Math by Alex Bellos was a fun romp through math. Each stand-alone chapter covered some aspect of math. In keeping with the math theme his first chapter was Chapter 0, which was confusing when referring to the book with another person who read the book with me. There was much history, some math explanations and quite a bit of fun. Here is a link to his web site, which includes articles about math. http://alexbellos.com/ Good enough that i've suggested it to a few others i know are intrigued with math and concepts, not to mention sudoku. Link to the discussion shared with the other person who read this with me here-- http://books.hyperboards.com/index.ph...

Sweeping Up Glass by Carolyn Wall. Kentucky family in a land where the wolves were imported by the main character's grandfather, all the way from Alaska, decades ago. Olivia Harker is a grandmother living with her grandson when the book opens. It goes back to share her history, the story of her mother's insanity & the way her father raised her. Author Wall is a mentor to my cousin, so i thought i'd give it a whirl. It was well written, imo, so Cousin is in good hands. However, i wouldn't go out of my way to read another book by the woman.

The House by the Sea: A Journal by May Sarton. A Book Buddy read with others on this board. I liked it very much, giving many points for discussion and individual pondering. Sarton is a gem i've enjoyed discovering with others here. This book, about the author's move to Maine, includes the author's acceptance of the death of friends and the Alzheimer's of her former long-term lover. Link to our discussion here-- http://www.goodreads.com/topic/show/5...

The Woman Who Watches Over the World: A Native Memoir by Linda Hogan. Interesting memoir, a non-linear work, making it a challenge to read. However, all i learned about tribes around the country and their issues, about problems with Hogan's health (including being bucked off a horse and her adoption of two Sioux children who had severe attachment disorders, was fascinating. Often she alit on a subject just enough to give an outline, never going too deep. Initially this was frustrating but i ended up liking where she lead working this way. Not for everyone but her writing and experiences are rich and worth my reading time.

Onward to August!

deborah


Shomeret | 125 comments I liked Sweeping Up Glassvery much and I probably would read more by Carolyn Wall, but I have a particular interest in books about Appalachia.

I've been collecting books by Linda Hogan meaning to read her at some point. I find them on the library sale cart for a dollar. They look very good.


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