Goodreads Author Feedback Group discussion

161 views
Publishing and Promoting > I'm exhausted




Comments (showing 1-27)    post a comment »
dateUp_arrow    newest »

Harriet Schultz | 4 comments Victoria wrote: "I so agree. The writing itself energizes me. It's the promotion: trying to sort through all the social media, figuring out how to maximize their effectiveness...that is the overwhelming aspect of b..."

Ditto to your last two sentences.


Harriet Schultz | 4 comments I hope that now that my book is on Amazon, Smashwords, B&N and the paperback is FINALLY out, I can focus on writing again. The past three months of searching out reviewers, learning the ropes of social media, and keeping track of my book's progress through various formatting processes, have been draining. Therefore I've done much too little on the WIP (sequel to book #1). It was moving right along until book #1 came out and then...nada. I need to recommit to it since people who've read my book are now clamoring for more--a nice problem, but expectations bring all kinds of new angsts!


Victoria Slotto (liv2write2day) | 11 comments I so agree. The writing itself energizes me. It's the promotion: trying to sort through all the social media, figuring out how to maximize their effectiveness...that is the overwhelming aspect of being a published author. Yet, I agree with David: the rewards of "I loved your book; I can't wait to tell my bookclub about it." That makes it worth the effort.


message 24: by [deleted user] (new)

Welcome all you weary wordsmiths.
I have recently stopped writing after a solid four years of work and ten novels completed.
Now I'm working on re-edits and the launch of my own Indi publishing enterprise. I find my creative flow has been put on hold and I plan to take a year to launch all ten novels. I will now put time and effort into selling. I tried to do both at the same time but found I was loosing sleep and the work was like pulling teeth. A long term plan and getting rid of the feeling of panic because I'd stopped creative writing, has been a huge release.
It is long slog - but the rewards are huge when even one reader says: "This is great."
Regards, davidrory.


George Hamilton | 16 comments I thought I was the only one who was exhausted from all this other work which does not involve writing. I wrote about my author's angst here. Here's hoping we can all find some happy balance.


Bridget Bowers (bridgetbowers) | 9 comments Promoting does seem to be a never ending task that would take away all my time. When my book first came out, I went overboard trying to be everywhere and promote it all over.

I think the important thing is to find the best places to engage an audience and do your best to become a part of the community. If you just drop in to "promote" and leave no one seems to take you seriously.

Of course, to become part of the community you get sucked in and have to fight your way free to find time to write again. If only the promoting was as easy at the writing.


Marie (MarieSymeou) | 1 comments M.A. wrote: "Book reviews, interviews, giveaways, library talks, book signing, blog, FB, Goodreads, email, Bowkerlink/myIdentifiers, CreateSpace, Lightning Source...

+ writing next book.

I'm exhausted."


I am feeling exactly the same right now. I am promoting two novels and trying to get on with writing a sequel to one of them. I am also a singer so I have to do a lot of online promoting and social networking for that as well. It does get to me sometimes so I try to take a day off, though it can be hard to stay off the internet.


Marcia Carrington | 5 comments Barbara wrote: "I think you need to set priorities. I also get bogged down, but a selling author told me that the best way to sell your book is to publish another one."

Yes, that is very true. I am working on uploading more works, and writing when I can, but, as everyone can attest, time seems to run through our fingers like nothing else.

I find, though, that whenever I make out a list of things to do, be it for writing, or for anything generally in life, I have it there in front of me, and it makes it easier for me to attack each task, and tick them off one by one. I find that otherwise I am floating a little aimlessly task-wise in a sea of unfinished chores.


message 19: by Karen (last edited Oct 16, 2011 02:49PM) (new)

Karen (KarenInglis) | 3 comments Sabine wrote: "I can totally sympathise with that. My book has been out for three days only but for a week I haven't written much...too busy with promotion. But I still force myself to write at least 600 words ev..."

I was drawn to this thread by the 'I am exhausted' title - and so glad to find like-minded (or, rather, like-affected') folk here. I self-published my first children's book at the end of August and am exhausted as I try to create interest through local PR/contacting local bookshops/schools/libraries etc. I have told myself that by end of October I must get into some of the more disciplined routines being mentioned here - otherwise I will never have time to write again. I have to say (whilst here) that I love the Goodreads site - such nice people and such a lovely feel to it all.. Good luck to all of you with your various ventures :) I'm in London, UK by the way!


Sabine Reed (sabineareed) | 28 comments I can totally sympathise with that. My book has been out for three days only but for a week I haven't written much...too busy with promotion. But I still force myself to write at least 600 words every day, although I should write at least 1500 words. Social media just sucks you right in...


Barbara Edwards (BarbaraEdwards) | 2 comments I think you need to set priorities. I also get bogged down, but a selling author told me that the best way to sell your book is to publish another one.


Rowena (Rowenacherry) | 86 comments Hey, E.S. and Noor,

Are you on LinkedIn? Take heart, some of those SEO types (marketing professionals) claim that when promoting a product, one should talk about anything and everything that interests the audience, but not about that which one hopes to sell to them.

So, you are probably golden.


E.S. Lark | 8 comments I think you shouldn't stop marketing completely, but use time management. For example, most writers set aside a block of time every day to write. You should do the same for your marketing.

I tend to spend and hour or two in the morning checking communities, adding to discussions and such. Then in the evening, I check around the web for about 30 minutes. The rest of my day is set aside for writing, editing, interior formatting and cover design.

Thing is, I don't go around asking people to 'buy my book.' I prefer to talk with other readers and writers like I'm doing now, hoping someone will want to learn more about me and my writing. It might not be the best marketing, but I've never been aggressive like that.


Noor Jahangir | 17 comments Yeah. Tell me about it. It feels like I'm spending all my time doing the marketing stuff and not enough time to spare to do the writing. Is there a cut off point when you should just stop doing marketing and focus on your next project? To tell the truth, I'm scared my book will sink as soon as I stop propping it up/


E.S. Lark | 8 comments The hubby and I are actually taking a 2 day vacation in October. I'm not allowed to bring my laptop or anything connected to the internet. I'll be stuck in a cabin for 2 whole days with nothing but his company, the outdoors (hiking trails), my notebook and a pen.

I cannot wait. I can already feel how badly I need to get away from the rush of things. And with my second book being released in November, I know I need the breather before getting back into the marketing craze.

I wish you the best of luck.


Larry Moniz (LarryMoniz) ttthomas wrote: "Ah so that's where you've been MA! My first book going to formatter's next week---and then I get to do everything you've just mentioned. I'm already tired! Nothing easy OR free about being Indie---..."

As they say: You go girl! :-)
Best,

Larry


Larry Moniz (LarryMoniz) Petra X wrote: "I met a guy the other day who had come to the island to write his next novel and was working as a barman in a local beach bar. More relaxing than working in NY!"

Oh yeah, hic, If I worked in a bar I'd never get any writing done. :-)


Larry Moniz (LarryMoniz) Peter wrote: "What are some tips people have to creating an island where they are?

To start, here's my suggestion: Don't read your email (or any blogs) or visit any websites before you've spent 90 minutes wri..."


Sounds reasonable. I try just the opposite. I've always been a night person so things are always bustling in my house when I wake up. My wife is a morning person who is in bed by 10:30 I do all my other tasks, during earlier hours. Then after she goes to be and our dogs have bedded down, I then try to spend 2-3 hours researching and or writing. My objective has always been to hit 1,500 words per night or at least 8,000 words a week. I also work from a book synopsis and a rough outline that's subject to alteration.


Larry Moniz (LarryMoniz) Linda wrote: "I was reading Amanda Hocking's blog, and she was going away for (a week?), renting a houseboat on a lake, so that she could just write without all the other distractions. Great for her...but for t..."

Linda, good luck with that. When you find her, post the address and we'll all pop over for a few days. ROTFL :-))


Linda Hawley (LindaHawley) | 24 comments Alan, I would love the old days when artists, writers, and other creative people were coveted by the rich, given a nice country cottage to write in...


T.T. Thomas (ttthomas) | 1 comments Ah so that's where you've been MA! My first book going to formatter's next week---and then I get to do everything you've just mentioned. I'm already tired! Nothing easy OR free about being Indie---and I wouldn't have it any other way!


Alan (AlanMcCluskey) | 20 comments Linda wrote: "I was reading Amanda Hocking's blog, and she was going away for (a week?), renting a houseboat on a lake, so that she could just write without all the other distractions. Great for her...but for t..."

Sounds like there's a market for someone to create an idyl where independent writers can retire to write. There was a place like that in France but for creative video. The guy who ran it, Pierre Bongiovanni, told me I could stay in their large country house when I needed to write a magazine about electronic arts I was working on at the time. I went once. it was wonderful. And talking to other people in residence there too was stimulating. It not longer exists. The government decided to cut the funding ...


Peter (74765525) | 49 comments What are some tips people have to creating an island where they are?

To start, here's my suggestion: Don't read your email (or any blogs) or visit any websites before you've spent 90 minutes writing?


Ms Bubbles SockieP (PetraX) I met a guy the other day who had come to the island to write his next novel and was working as a barman in a local beach bar. More relaxing than working in NY!


Linda Hawley (LindaHawley) | 24 comments I was reading Amanda Hocking's blog, and she was going away for (a week?), renting a houseboat on a lake, so that she could just write without all the other distractions. Great for her...but for the rest of us exhausting ourselves writing another book, it's another matter. I'd like to knock on her houseboat door and, when she answers, say, "Hi Amanda, you don't know me, but I'm also an Indie author, and I'd like to stay with you and write my next novel. I promise I won't be a bother." Ha Ha


message 2: by Larry (last edited Jun 22, 2011 04:53PM) (new)

Larry Moniz (LarryMoniz) M.A., believe me, I hear ya! Toss in bad weather that aggravates by COPD. What a blast-uh oh, was that my lungs exploding? :-(
I try to joke about it, but not always easy.

Hang in there friend.


M.A. Demers | 120 comments Book reviews, interviews, giveaways, library talks, book signing, blog, FB, Goodreads, email, Bowkerlink/myIdentifiers, CreateSpace, Lightning Source...

+ writing next book.

I'm exhausted.


back to top
unread topics | mark unread