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Writer Q & A (Archived) > Q and A with author Angela Yuriko Smith: June 17th-19th

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message 1: by A.F. (last edited Jun 17, 2011 06:26AM) (new)

A.F. (scribe77) | 1542 comments Mod
Angela Yuriko Smith is a professional writer with extensive experience in newspapers and online publications. Her work has been featured internationally, including a live interview on NPR.
Under her former byline she worked for two years as a contract writer for MilitaryLifeStyle.com which included interviews with Joan Jett, John Nance, Amy Dacyczyn, and Randy’L He-Dow Teton, the only living model for an American coin. There she published over 60 articles and maintained two columns entitled SAHMM I Am, Military by Moonlight and covered the 9/11 crisis from the viewpoint of a military spouse. She was also interviewed at that time for the Satellite Sister’s Show on National Public Radio.
Previously published under the byline of Angela Yuriko Cato and occasionally under her pen name of Dandilyon Jinx, she currently lives in Australia. She also has a large collection of regular newspaper clips from her time at The Community News in Browns Mills, New Jersey and a few pieces for The Daily News in Fort Walton Beach, Florida. Otherwise she prefers to work online.
Currently she maintains her blog, is finishing book projects and exploring virtual marketing via House of SilverJinx, a successful design business. Her first book, End of Mae was released on May 31st, 2011.

Her Goodreads Profile: http://www.goodreads.com/user/show/5479500-angela-smith

Angela has generously offered a paperback copy of her novel, End of Mae, to one random commenter, as well as a free Smashwords ebook download to every person who stops by with a question.


Just a Note: Remember Angela is joining us online from Australia, so the time zone difference may cause some delays in her answers.

End of Mae by Angela Smith


message 2: by Angela (new)

Angela Smith (dandilyonfluff) | 87 comments G'day everybody ;p


message 3: by J.A. (new)

J.A. Clement (JAClement) | 29 comments Hey Angela!

'SAHMM I am' is a great title - made me laugh...

Looks like you've done a lot of newspaper journalism over the years - do you feel that this has informed your writing style and nose for a story? And do you have a favourite article (funny, poignant, informative or whatever?) or story from your newspaper years?

JAC


message 4: by Ivan (new)

Ivan Torres | 5 comments Hello Angela! It may be a silly one, but I have a question that could enlighten me with the conception process of this novel.

What brought you to The Jersey Devil as your plot hook?


message 5: by Bailey (new)

Bailey Bristol (baileybristol) | 13 comments Hi, Angela. Thanks for the opportunity to lob some questions your way. Here's mine:

Are you a plotter or a pantser? (Kurt Vonnegut was the first to make these designations, I believe.) In other words, do you craft a detailed plot and then begin to write? Or do you start at the beginning and write by the seat of your pants? Since it's only fair, I will admit to being a plotter wannabe, but a real-time pantser.


message 6: by Angela (new)

Angela Smith (dandilyonfluff) | 87 comments Thank you, I loved that column and that title, and those were probably some of my easiest and most loved stories to write. They were all about my experiences staying at home with my kids, and what mom doesn't want to talk about her kids?

Aside from that I think probably interviewing Amy Dacyczyn was one of the biggest thrills because I was (and is) actually a huge fan of her Tightwad Gazette books.

As far as how my journalism has affected my writing; I see fiction and non fiction as two sides of the same coin. When we do journalistic writing we are glamourizing a real person, highlighting certain aspects of their character that we want to present. Fiction is creating a character from our imagination, but usually they are based on aspects of real people.

I think they compliment each other nicely, but fiction is harder for me.

J.A. wrote: "Hey Angela!

'SAHMM I am' is a great title - made me laugh...

Looks like you've done a lot of newspaper journalism over the years - do you feel that this has informed your writing style and no..."



message 7: by Angela (new)

Angela Smith (dandilyonfluff) | 87 comments Great question, and I've been dying to answer it. At the end of the book there is a news story printed from The Community News of Browns Mills, NJ. This is the actual story that got my imagination fired up to write this tale, and there's actually a few short stories floating around from the Jersey Devil's point of view.

I got a kick out of reprinting the story, and I guess including real facts with this fictional story was the journalist in me refusing to be pushed aside. I don't know anyone at that paper anymore, but it still exits and I keep meaning to write them a letter and send them a book. Thx for the great questions so far!

Ivan wrote: "Hello Angela! It may be a silly one, but I have a question that could enlighten me with the conception process of this novel.

What brought you to The Jersey Devil as your plot hook?"



message 8: by Angela (new)

Angela Smith (dandilyonfluff) | 87 comments I am a HUGE pantser. This tale was put together in key peices, but there was something missing for a long time, the story didn't have any connection.

Then I started meeting friends that were huge into vampire lore, and one day it hit me that Heylel was a vampire and the whole thing fell into place.

Even my non fiction is pretty much by the pants. I'll have a general idea where I'm going, but the article finds it's own path there. Like you, I'd like to be more of a plotter, but it always seems to have a life of its own.

Thanks for the question!
Bailey wrote: "Hi, Angela. Thanks for the opportunity to lob some questions your way. Here's mine:

Are you a plotter or a pantser? (Kurt Vonnegut was the first to make these designations, I believe.) In other wo..."



message 9: by A.F. (new)

A.F. (scribe77) | 1542 comments Mod
Hi, Angela. I'm curious, in your fiction do you consider yourself a genre writer?


message 10: by Paul (new)

Paul Jones (PaulAntonyJones) | 38 comments G'day Angela,

Congratulations on the release of your novel. One of the major hurdles for any author taking the self-publishing route is marketing their work. I was wondering what techniques you are using (besides this interview) to get your novel work noticed?

Thanks for taking the time to answer our questions.

PAUL


message 11: by Angela (last edited Jun 17, 2011 07:50AM) (new)

Angela Smith (dandilyonfluff) | 87 comments "Hi, Angela. I'm curious, in your fiction do you consider yourself a genre writer?"


Not at all. Whenever I write fiction the story usually just kind of pops out on its own, and it niggles away at me until I sit down and write it. It could be horror, romance or most likely a blend. The story really decides what it will be.

Up until now I've only ever done short stories and articles... Mae is my longest to date, but I'm getting more comfortable with committing to longer works. The non fiction follow up I'm working on now is already one quarter the length of Mae.

Thx for asking... how about you? I wonder if there are a lot of genre writers or if writers tend to blend genres now?


message 12: by Angela (new)

Angela Smith (dandilyonfluff) | 87 comments G'day Paul (I'm really an American living in Oz, so I'm borrowing my g'day ;p)

This is one of my favorite topics. The book I'm working on now is actually all about the different things I am doing to market End of Mae.

I'm actually using Second Life to market my book. There are a few posts on specifics on my blog, dandilyonfluff.com, but basically I've rebuilt the scenes from the book in that world along with a virtual edition of End of Mae that contains the first chapter as a teaser.

Right now, just a few weeks into promotion (I published 31 May) I have 30 to 50 unique visitors a day exploring, I have contacted around 500 bloggers and editors with a virtual press release, I have a spotlight interview coming up to talk about my book for the SL Enquirer... this cost me pretty much nothing but know how.

I could go on, that's why I have to make it a book ;p but please look thru my blog for updates on that. The marketing plan I'm using is turing out to be wildly successful. It's my theory that some very good literature sits unnoticed on shelves because of a lack of marketing. It's such a competitive field, we need any edge we can get.

I love talking about this subject, and will be posting an excerpt from the new book, called All You Need is "Like" in the next day or two.

Thx for a great question... I love talking about marketing!

Paul wrote: "G'day Angela,

Congratulations on the release of your novel. One of the major hurdles for any author taking the self-publishing route is marketing their work. I was wondering what techniques you ar..."



message 13: by Paul (new)

Paul Jones (PaulAntonyJones) | 38 comments "I'm actually using Second Life to market my book."

That is possibly the single most unique marketing avenue I have ever heard of. I think it's easy for us all to forget that we have a whole digital world out there to market our books and, as cliched as it may sound, we really do need to start thinking outside that box.

I look forward to reading your blog. Best of luck to you.

PAUL


message 14: by A.F. (new)

A.F. (scribe77) | 1542 comments Mod
Angela wrote: ""Hi, Angela. I'm curious, in your fiction do you consider yourself a genre writer?"


Not at all. Whenever I write fiction the story usually just kind of pops out on its own, and it niggles awa..."


I'm a geek girl through to my bones, so in my fiction, I stick to fantasy and sci-fi fairly exclusively, though I wander over into horror now and then.


message 15: by Angela (new)

Angela Smith (dandilyonfluff) | 87 comments Thank you Paul! I wish I could put more information in these tiny comment spaces, but the exposure and feedback I'm getting is phenomenal. Second Life picked my virtual construction of "Heylel's mansion" from the story as an Editor's Pick for thier Destination Picks which goes out to around 200,000 people on Facebook alone.

The internet opens up the playing field for those of us without a huge marketing bundle. Creativity is our currency. I'm experimenting on End of Mae so I can accurately tell everyone new ways that really work.

I can talk about marketing for hours (as my husband unfortunately knows too well)

Paul wrote: ""I'm actually using Second Life to market my book."

That is possibly the single most unique marketing avenue I have ever heard of. I think it's easy for us all to forget that we have a whole digit..."


Haha! Thanks Paul, I


message 16: by Angela (new)

Angela Smith (dandilyonfluff) | 87 comments Geeks rule the world now :D

A. F. wrote: "Angela wrote: ""Hi, Angela. I'm curious, in your fiction do you consider yourself a genre writer?"


Not at all. Whenever I write fiction the story usually just kind of pops out on its own, and..."



message 17: by Sheila (new)

Sheila | 104 comments You're making me feel so much better about my writing Angela :) Nice to meet a real pantzer and genre-hopper. I'm still struggling to imagine how you're using Second Life, but perhaps if I actually visited Second Life it would help.

Not started reading End of Mae yet but it's outline in red (meaning to be read soon) on my list.


message 18: by Angela (new)

Angela Smith (dandilyonfluff) | 87 comments There are some pretty detailed posts on my blog with photos and slideshows. My trailer was also filmed in Second Life. You can see that at endofmae.com. Someday soon I'll organize my blog with tags so it's easier to find info ;p

And to answer your pantzer/genre hopping comment, I'm glad we all create differently so we can have a wide variety of viewpoints. I wish I was like Rowling and map out all my character bios to great detail, but I attack a story more like Jason with a chainsaw. My desktop is littered with chopped off bits of story.

Originally Bea lives on and tries to find Mae to save her, but she got tied up with a preacher in a church and annoyed me so I cut all her story out. There was also a sex scene originally near the end, that also got cut as I pictured my mom in law and kids reading it. There's probably about 5,000 more words of the story at least that I chopped out.

But I like it now. Bea smelled anyways ;p


message 19: by Angela (new)

Angela Smith (dandilyonfluff) | 87 comments And thanks for the friendship :D


message 20: by Angela (new)

Angela Smith (dandilyonfluff) | 87 comments I have lived in Australia since Ausgust of 2010. I hope to return to the states by the end of this year and basically live in both countries. My husband has family here, and I have family in the US, so we'll try to split our time between the two countries if we can. We have a 1968 Airstream in America... it's our budget 'vacation home'.

As far as why Australia and not Paris, my husband is Australian which kind of answers why I'm here. It's an awesome country and the people and food are phenominal.

Thx Carroll, I enjoyed seeing you on the Hotseat last week ;p


message 21: by Cassie (new)

Cassie McCown (cassie629) | 15 comments It is kinda a dream of mine to only live in the fall and winter, splitting my year between the US and somewhere like Australia...LOL...

When you were staying home with your kids, how did you find time to balance everything...being a mom, writing, housework, writing, etc. :-)?? I find it is all too easy to be overwhelmed with everything.


message 22: by Angela (last edited Jun 17, 2011 11:23AM) (new)

Angela Smith (dandilyonfluff) | 87 comments I hope we can do that, but I don't relish the long plane ride or price!

It was a real challenge having kids and trying to have a career as a writer. You will laugh, but I finished many articles for the newspaper I worked for at the time on my knees in front of the computer with my youngest hanging on for dear life trying to nurse.

I used to feel a bit like a cheater at the find interviews game, because I used to grab stories where I could find them. One of the best was of a race car driver. I was driving by a shop with the kids when I spotted a shiny green race car and a small crowd. I pulled up behind it and interviewed the driver through my car window. I stepped out to take a few photos, and we were off to the grocery store. That driver loved the story so much he invited the whole family to the track at his next race, and I got to stand in between the cars as they started up and got the most amazing photos. I hadn't bet on all the gravel that would spin up and pelt me, or being deaf for the next day from the engine roar, but it was worth it.

My advice to working with children? Make them part of it. Moms multitask, and writer moms need to multi-multitask.
Cassie wrote: "It is kinda a dream of mine to only live in the fall and winter, splitting my year between the US and somewhere like Australia...LOL...

When you were staying home with your kids, how did you fin..."



message 23: by Angela (new)

Angela Smith (dandilyonfluff) | 87 comments Carroll wrote: "What has been the biggest blunder in your writing career thus far?

As you know, I recently published an unedited version of my book and can't recall ever being more humiliated. And while progres..."


Carroll,

I had a very similar experience with End of Mae. Originally I pulished it as The SilverJinx. I was getting ready to move to Australia and was in a rush to finish it before I went. It wasn't really ready, but I was so eager to see my name on a book cover that I convinced myself it was 'good enough'. Fortunately fate stepped in, and someone that was helping me look it over mistakenly corrected all the words "may" in the book to be the character's name, "Mae".

One copy went out and I pulled it. It wound up being the best thing that ever happened for it tho. I wound up rewriting it and added some new things to connect up the story and now I love it.

I think self publishing is the logical choice for writers these days, with all the intense competition. If you actually do wind up getting your book signed on with a traditional house you'll probably be largely left to do all your own marketing anyways, except you are tossed a pittance for royalties.

Self publishing also means we can be victims of our own egos, as I was. I wanted to see my name on a book so bad, at the time I didn't care about anything else. It took me a year to correct and republish it, but now I know it's ready so I'm happy. Took me a year to cool down ;p


message 24: by Angela (new)

Angela Smith (dandilyonfluff) | 87 comments Ken wrote: "Good evening Angela. I hope you are well as you are answering the Q & A portion here tonight. I would like to ask you two questions. And they are more towards questions about an author's outlook.
..."


Ken, good questions! I've experienced loss in my life. When I was younger I let myself be defined by the bad things that happened to me. I was suicidal and always having drama issues. I spent time in a drug rehab, almost died from alchol poisoning, spent some time living on the streets... I don't dwell on it but I want to reference where I came from.

The thing that changed for me was the day I realized that I could no longer blame everyone else for the bad things that happened to me. It was my reaction to life that was causing my problems.

All that to say that I believe that "the key to rising above life's challenges and disappointments" would be self accountability. Once you take responsibility for your life you don't have anyone to point fingers at but yourself. That's pretty motivating for me.

As far as I define hope, I would love to quote Meg Griffen from Family Guy here, but in my own words to me hope is being oblivious to failure.

I know that things are not always wonderful, but I choose to see them that way. I would rather enjoy the smell of the rose as I am scratched by the thorns than only be concious that I am being scratched.


message 25: by Amy (new)

Amy (Dranea) | 103 comments Hello Angela!!

I would just like to know, what do you find the most rewarding about writing?


message 26: by Angela (new)

Angela Smith (dandilyonfluff) | 87 comments Carroll wrote: "Angela wrote: "Ken wrote: "Good evening Angela. I hope you are well as you are answering the Q & A portion here tonight. I would like to ask you two questions. And they are more towards questions a..."

Thanks for asking Carroll! We all like talking about our new projects :D

I'm actually deep in my next book right now, and it's the story behind the story. I'm running a very non traditional promotional campaign for End of Mae, and I've been keeping notes on it from the beginning. The techniques I'm using typically focus on costing little to nothing and reach maximum exposure.

I've brushed over it some in my blog, dandilyonfluff.com, as well as in earlier questions, but there is honestly so much involved with the topic I can barely cover even a potion of the topic. The new book is called All You Need is "Like" and will available, I hope, in the next few months. Of course we know how the best laid plans can be waylaid by the simplest things ;p so we'll see.

I am also working on a new book that features the characters from End of Mae, and I am actually trying to go a little more 'plotter' (ref. a question above) on it, so I can give a few hints.

The same characters will continue on, but Heylel may find a little bit of role reversal going on, and I'm afraid poor Dr. Smeltzer may accidentally become Mae's first meal.


message 27: by Angela (new)

Angela Smith (dandilyonfluff) | 87 comments Amy wrote: "Hello Angela!!

I would just like to know, what do you find the most rewarding about writing?"


Amy, hopefully a year from now I'll answer this question and say "amazing wealth & non intrusive fame"!

For now tho, I'd have to say that writing is the thing I feel most capable at, and it has been that way since I can remember writing my first story somewhere around 2nd grade.

Writing has served me all my life as a key to get in places and talk to people that I would otherwise not have access to. At times, it has been my ticket to free meals and entertainment. I think mostly tho, I don't have much of a choice. I seem to constantly translate my world with words in whatever outlet is in front of me. Sometimes that means loooong emails to friends who just wanted a quick answer.

The most rewarding thing is seeing words go down that enable me to translate the world as I see it so that I can share. Metaphorically I think of writers as crystal prisms. The white light passes into us, unremarkable and common. We divide it with our words and separate the brillance for the rest of the world to see. That is a satisfying thing.


message 28: by Angela (new)

Angela Smith (dandilyonfluff) | 87 comments Ken wrote: "Thanks Angela. Those are some very insightful answers you have provided, it is very much appreciated.

I just have two more questions for the evening:

1] Anticipation or the real thing. Which ..."


Thx Ken, you always have interesting questions! I think anticipation is better for me. I am impatient, I always want everything to happen yesterday, but looking forward to things is definately more exciting to me. Except when we're talking chocolate. Just give it to me, don't make me wait.

As far as Vegemite goes, yes, I've had it and I like the flavor in moderation. The first time I tasted it I made the mistake of licking a glob of it off a spoon.

It's much too intense for that and I spent the next ten minutes gagging and trying to clear my palate. We usually have it lightly spread on toast. I haven't tried it on crackers yet, but it makes a great ingredient for flavor and I add it to the sauce in meat pies when I make them.


message 29: by Angela (new)

Angela Smith (dandilyonfluff) | 87 comments Ken wrote: "Thanks Angela. And many thanks for your answer in regards to the Vegemite! Have a great weekend!"

My pleasure, and you too :D I was apprehensive about doing a Q&A, but I'm enjoying myself.


message 30: by C.E. (new)

C.E. Hart (CherylHartFiction) Hi Angela.
While doing interviews for MilitaryLifeStyle.com, who was your favorite interviewee and why? Did anyone surprise you? (Such as - they were much different than you'd first thought...)

Also, what has been most encouraging and discouraging in your writing career thus far?


message 31: by Angela (new)

Angela Smith (dandilyonfluff) | 87 comments My favorite interview was probably Amy Dacyczyn of the Tightwad Gazette fame. The day we talked she was canning a ton of green beans, impressing me that she was living what she taught. The interview that most surprised me was Joan Jett. That interview was mostly conducted with her manager, Kenny Laguna, because she was so worn out and exhausted. It was just a shock to see how all the traveling and fame had drained her. I expected her to be the crazy rebel bad girl I'd seen on Mtv.

I'd actually have to say that the promotional work I have done on this book so far has been the most encouraging time in my entire writing career. There is so much competition in fiction, I was afraid that End of Mae would be born and fade without causing a ripple. It's far beyond my expectations, and it's not because it's so wonderful but because it's so well marketed. That information I can share and possibly save a lot of fine work that winds up un noticed. This is a pet project of mine, so I apologize if I seem to harp on it.

My most discouraging moment was when I held in my hands the first published version of the book, and starting finding one accidental typo repeated throughout the book. I finally had it finished, and I had to pull it. It worked out for the best, but at the time it was a major disappointment.

Thx for the great questions and the friendship!


message 32: by Amy (new)

Amy (Dranea) | 103 comments Angela wrote: "Amy wrote: "Hello Angela!!

I would just like to know, what do you find the most rewarding about writing?"

Amy, hopefully a year from now I'll answer this question and say "amazing wealth & no..."





That was very elegantly said! I know I do wish for you amazing wealth and superstar-dom!!!

And since it appears we can ask more than one question, I would also like to ask..

If you were to be hit by a balloon filled with jello, what type of jello would you prefer it to be, and why?

:)


message 33: by Angela (new)

Angela Smith (dandilyonfluff) | 87 comments Ken wrote: "Good afternoon Angela. I hope the weekend has been good so far, and I am glad you are enjoying the Q & A. I have two questions for you this afternoon:

1] How has experience determined your attit..."


G'morning Ken! More good questions :D
Experience has taught me a few good lessons that I use constantly.
1. Take nothing too personally or too seriously.
2. Bad experiences are just opportunities that take more work.
3. My attitude is an indicator of whether my day will be good or bad.

This makes me the often disgustingly cheerful person I am. I don't want to be deluded and live in a world of artificial expectations, but in the past I have honestly found that what upset me wasn't worth my upset, and that if I always look for the best I enjoy the trip much more, even if it turns out for the worst in the end. This results in my being what one friend of mine termed "terminally perky".

My last random act of kindness would be taking time to help a non english speaking person lost at the End of Mae virtual exhibit. Typically called "noobs" and largely ignored, I always think there is a person behind the lack of language that craves friendship and respect like any of us.

Your questions gave my brain a better boost then my coffee this morning Ken :D


message 34: by Angela (new)

Angela Smith (dandilyonfluff) | 87 comments Amy wrote: "Angela wrote: "Amy wrote: "Hello Angela!!

I would just like to know, what do you find the most rewarding about writing?"

Amy, hopefully a year from now I'll answer this question and say "amazing ..."


Amy, your question prompted much discussion in the Smith household this morning! If I were to get hit with a balloon full of jello, I honestly say I would prefer it to be sugar free with no color, like that knox gelatine, so that I could clean it up easier. I'd also probably try to find my attacker and share some of the jello on me back with them.

If I were to have a kiddie pool of jello, however, and I was suppossed to be wrestling in it, I think I would prefer cherry for the titillating word association as well as it being a pleasant flavor.

Back in the 80's I tried to use knox gelatine as hair gel to help my hair spike better, and it was always hard to wash out. I can only imagine being covered in pink staining cherry jello, leading me to think that jello wrestler girls probably make pretty good money.


message 35: by Angela (new)

Angela Smith (dandilyonfluff) | 87 comments Carroll wrote: "Just wanted to pop in Angela and throw something out at you, if I may.

If seeing is believing - what haven't you ever seen that makes you believe in it?

And as for Joan Jett, I agree, she is ..."



Carroll, I think the jello question put me in a silly mood, because what I want to answer to your "what have I not seen but believe in" question is money. I do believe it's out there!

To make a serious answer tho, I'd have to say the Jersey Devil. I lived in the Whitesbog area from the book for a few years, and everyone I knew was actually nervous to go out in the dark there.

The house we lived in was on a lake, and I believe to this day that it was haunted. My 4 yr old daughter and I both heard laughing from empty space. Toys would go off in empty rooms, doors would unlock themselves within minutes.

I never saw a ghost or the Jersey Devil, but after what I experienced there I 100% believe in them.

Good question Carroll! (...and now I have goosebumps. Glad it's morning here ;p)


message 36: by Baxter (new)

Baxter Trautman "There are more things in heaven and earth, Horatio,
Than are dreamt of in your philosophy." What a perfect segue! First of all, Angela, thanks for taking the time to so generously answer all our questions.

I hated Shakespeare, as most high-school kids do, but after I started writing I "discovered" him, and realized why he has survived the centuries. Once I got past the old English I began to see how deviously funny, tragic, insightful, and even scary, he was with a few deft strokes of the pen. Quill, rather. Whose works, both historic and modern, do you admire most? Best, Baxter

Baxter Clare Trautman, The River Within
Web site: http://baxterclare.com
Blog: http://baxterclare.com/blog Web site: http://baxterclare.com
Blog: http://baxterclare.com/blog


message 37: by Angela (new)

Angela Smith (dandilyonfluff) | 87 comments Baxter wrote: ""There are more things in heaven and earth, Horatio,
Than are dreamt of in your philosophy." What a perfect segue! First of all, Angela, thanks for taking the time to so generously answer all our q..."


Baxter, I actually looked up the word "segue" and learned up something new. The name "Segway" makes so much more sense now. ;p

I love classic literature and agree that Shakespeare has great merit, but of the older work I adore Dickens and Poe. Dickens brings out such flavor in his work; it may take a chapter to describe a room but back then what else did anyone have to do in their off time but read? Poe I love for his unapologetic love of the morbid, as well as the attention to detail. Just to list books, Little Women and the Little House on the Prairie books are my "comfort food reads".

As far as modern writers, I'd have to say Neil Gaiman tops my list with his graphic Sandman novels, Coraline and Stardust. I also love Rowling and Anne Rice's earlier work. Peter Straub also stands out in my mind.

Thx for the great question Baxter!


message 38: by Angela (last edited Jun 18, 2011 07:37PM) (new)

Angela Smith (dandilyonfluff) | 87 comments Ken wrote: "Good evening Angela. Saturday evening here is fine, and I understand it is Sunday afternoon at your side. Hope lunch was good.

I hope that the brain boost this morning from answering my question..."


Two more good questions!

Love is like your best day dream made real, pulled from the realms of ambiguous feeling to this life where you can touch it with your lips, your hands and quantify it. It is a fantasy that can be measured in happy glances, made real by the participation of someone else. Love is everything you didn't know was there suddenly coming into technicolor reality, like magic glasses which show the world in all its glory. It's a terrifying thing, because if you lose it the world becomes normal again, but what was once normal will seem drab by the comparison of what once was. My advice would be to treasure while you have it, try to forget it when you don't.

To answer your second question: I've run into a few former lovers in my time and a lot depends on which of you has moved on and which of you hasn't. Usually I have found it to be a bit awkward, but it's always interesting to see where the other person is and what you have both been up to. Unless they are doing badly, and then there is just guilt. That's how it is for me, but it may be different for someone else. These days Facebook seems to be a primary "former lover" meeting ground.


message 39: by A.F. (new)

A.F. (scribe77) | 1542 comments Mod
Okay, I'd like to thank Angela for joining us and all the participants for their insightful questions. Today, I'll be picking a random name from the commenters for the free paperback copy of Angela's book (and Angela will be in touch with the winner to arrange delivery). As well, I'll be sending every commenter the download coupon for the Smashwords ebook copy, so keep an eye on your Goodreads email.


message 40: by A.F. (new)

A.F. (scribe77) | 1542 comments Mod
I've, hopefully, sent out all the coupon codes to your Goodreads email. If any commenter on this Q and A did not get one please let me know.


message 41: by Angela (new)

Angela Smith (dandilyonfluff) | 87 comments Thank you A.F. Stewart for having me, it was a real pleasure. This is the first time I've done anything like this; I started out nervous and wound up having fun. I hope everyone else enjoyed it as much as I did! Enoy your books!

Cheers!
Angela Yuriko Smith
dandilyonfluff.com
endofmae.com


message 42: by Amy (new)

Amy (Dranea) | 103 comments Angela wrote: "Amy wrote: "Angela wrote: "Amy wrote: "Hello Angela!!

I would just like to know, what do you find the most rewarding about writing?"

Amy, hopefully a year from now I'll answer this question a..."


That is too funny!! I'm glad I could spark some round table discussion!! LOL


message 43: by Amy (new)

Amy (Dranea) | 103 comments Angela wrote: "Thank you A.F. Stewart for having me, it was a real pleasure. This is the first time I've done anything like this; I started out nervous and wound up having fun. I hope everyone else enjoyed it a..."

And thank you very much for your generosity!! I appreciate the book! :)


message 44: by Angela (new)

Angela Smith (dandilyonfluff) | 87 comments I hope you enjoy it! :D


message 45: by Angela (last edited Jun 21, 2011 04:54AM) (new)

Angela Smith (dandilyonfluff) | 87 comments It was my pleasure, and you all gave me much food for thought. I'd love to do it again anytime!

If anyone winds up doing a review please let me know so I can share it on my blog and facebook. :D


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Books mentioned in this topic

End of Mae (other topics)
The River Within (other topics)