Pikes Peak Library District discussion

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Discussion Questions > What are you reading now?

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Almira (volcano_lover) | 5 comments The Real Elizabeth, by Andrew Mara. An excellent insight into, not only The Queen, but of how she was "molded" for the role by her Father, George VI.


Reddwhine | 5 comments Just started "Rebecca" by Daphne DuMaurier. It is for my book club but also for fun. It is one of my favorite old classic books.


Jennifer | 2 comments I am currently listening to "The Swerve". Only on disc 2 but a very fascinating nonfiction account of how the ancient Roman philosophical epic, On the Nature of Things, changed the course of human thought, paved the way for the Renaissance, and made the modern world possible.


Carol | 4 comments I just finished "Carry the One" by Carol Anshaw. The writing is excellent and the story rang true for me. Carol Anshaw is a terrific writer, at times, very funny.


Carissa (sparklingangel84) | 2 comments I'm currently reading "The Forgotten Garden" by Kate Morton. I'm only about 60 pages in but what an amazing 60 pages!

It's about this 4-year-old little girl who was taken aboard a ship heading from England to Australia. At least, that's how it starts. She arrives without any family (it was sort of a strange kidnapping, I don't know the details yet) but she's taken into the family of a very kind man and his wife. Nell is the name they give her and they keep her as their own until her 21st birthday when her father feels he should tell her of her mysterious origins. There's more to it than this, naturally, such as the older Nell who takes care of her granddaughter Cassandra and then the Nell who is on her deathbed and that is when Cassandra learns of her grandmother's past and discovers she's inherited not only the house her grandmother lived in but also a house in England which is undoubtedly the one where she was raised until she was 4-years-old. It's a fantastic read, very fairytalish.


Kel | 4 comments I LOVED "The Forgotten Garden." I won't give anything away, but it will hold your attention until the end.


Beth I'm reading The Sociopath Next Door by Martha Stout for a book club discussion, but I think it will be useful for my mystery writing, too. It's rather dry nonfiction, having been written by a PhD psychologist, but it's insightful in figuring out how SOME killers are made.


message 58: by Philip (last edited Jul 19, 2012 09:52AM) (new)

Philip | 1 comments I just finished reading Oryx and Crake in preparation for the APPR title, The Year of the Flood. I'm also re-reading one of my favorites from childhood, From the Mixed-Up Files of Mrs Basil E. Frankweiler.


MountainShelby | 5 comments Reddwhine wrote: "Just started "Rebecca" by Daphne DuMaurier. It is for my book club but also for fun. It is one of my favorite old classic books."

I LOVE Rebecca (the novel) and have also seen all the BBC and film productions. I am so happy people are still reading the book--and in a book club too!


M.L. | 2 comments I am currently reading a copy of Prepared by Geoffrey Germann that was given to me by the author so I could rate and review it. I am also reading Stephen King's The Dark Tower (Book 7 of the series) and re-reading Salem's Lot.


Rod Summitt | 16 comments I am re-reading the fifty early 1900s to mid 1900s romance novels of Emilie Loring in order of publication [1922-1963]- [the last few were actually written by her sons using her pre-prepared notes and outlines]. If one can get by the dated phrases and word usage, they are excellent plots and even more excellent characters. I have without doubt never read any author who can paint a picture of a scene either outdoors or indoors with words as well as Ms. Loring – or for that matter descriptions of characters within those scenes. Authors, and especially aspiring authors, should read her to see how she uses words as a tool of an artist. Her characters and her plots can be as meaningful today as they were then.


Kel | 4 comments Rod wrote: "I am re-reading the fifty early 1900s to mid 1900s romance novels of Emilie Loring in order of publication [1922-1963]- [the last few were actually written by her sons using her pre-prepared notes ..."

I have read a lot of Loring. My faves are "In Times Like These" and "We Ride the Gale." There is one book I really loved, but cannot find again. I can't remember the title, but it's about a guy who breaks off with his fiance and says he'll marry the first woman he sees. That women initally looks like a hag, but turns out to be gorgeous and has a badly burned brother who's a noted actor. Do you know which one this is? I would love to reread.


MountainShelby | 5 comments Rod wrote: "I am re-reading the fifty early 1900s to mid 1900s romance novels of Emilie Loring in order of publication [1922-1963]- [the last few were actually written by her sons using her pre-prepared notes ..."

I have never heard of Loring until now. She was certainly prolific.


Rod Summitt | 16 comments Kel---can't help you---just read the backs of all 50 Bantum paperbacks of her [and her +sons] and none of the descriptions would seem to be that which you describe--if she did other books besides the 50 mentioned earlier, I do not know of them. -- Rod


theelfqueen (scifimama) | 8 comments Emma by Jane Austen

It's a re-read.


Kel | 4 comments Rod wrote: "Kel---can't help you---just read the backs of all 50 Bantum paperbacks of her [and her +sons] and none of the descriptions would seem to be that which you describe--if she did other books besides t..."
Thanks anyway. I am pretty sure it's Loring, but it has been quite a while. If, in your reading of Loring, you come across this plot, please give me a heads-up. Thanks.


message 67: by A. (new)

A. (sevenmoonlight) | 4 comments I am reading Deadly Spin by Wendell Potter. Incredible stuff, I highly recommend it.


message 68: by Alana (last edited Nov 27, 2012 07:35AM) (new)

Alana (alanasbooks) | 5 comments Beth wrote: "I'm reading The Sociopath Next Door by Martha Stout for a book club discussion, but I think it will be useful for my mystery writing, too. It's rather dry nonfiction, having been written by a PhD p..."

My husband had to read that for one of his psychology classes actually. He loved it, but that's also right up his alley, so I'm not sure it's for everyone. It does at least explain the right context for the word "sociopath" because it's way overused in society without the right meaning. The book sounds disturbing and very interesting at the same time.


Kristin (savannahjan) | 3 comments I'm reading Joseph Andrews by Henry Fielding. I've been slogging through it since October. I don't think I'd recommend this to anyone. It just isn't as good as Tom Jones. This was Fielding's first novel, and it just lacks the craftmanship he gained later on with Tom Jones. I should give up on it, but I'm a stubborn mule.


Beth Some good reads that I've finished recently and recommend include Rainwater, Learning to Swim, and The Bartender's Tale. I'm currently reading the very funny memoir, Enslaved by Ducks, and next on my list is a mystery by one of my favorite authors, A Trick of the Light.


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