The History Book Club discussion

154 views

Comments (showing 1-49 of 49) (49 new)    post a comment »
dateDown_arrow    newest »

message 1: by Bentley, Group Founder, Leader, Chief (new)

Bentley | 24010 comments What are those great cookbooks that you depend upon every day or that your parents and grand parents depended upon?

Are there some cookbooks that are historical in nature that you would like to add or are there cookbooks that are beautiful works of art in and of themselves. It would be nice to share these cookbooks and books with each other.

So this is a thread to discuss the world of cooking and those books which help to make good food possible. On our very own cookbook thread.

Bentley



message 2: by Alisa (last edited May 26, 2011 09:21PM) (new)

Alisa (MsTaz) | 5301 comments I love reading cookbooks, I love everything about reading cookbooks. The pictures, to me the recipes themselves are like little short stories that require some imagination and visualization on the part of the reader. My favorite cookbooks tend to be those that offer a little history within the book itself. I have lots of favorites of many varieties. And for a little history with your cookbook, there is nothing like Southern food to get you there!

Every Day's a Party  Louisiana Recipes For Celebrating With Family And Friends by Emeril Lagasse by Emeril LagasseEmeril Lagasse

My New Orleans  The Cookbook by John Besh by John Besh
My New Orleans will change the way you look at New Orleans cooking and the way you see World-famous chef John Besh. It's 16 chapters of culture, history, essay and insight, and pure goodness. Besh tells us the story of his New Orleans by the season and by the dish. Archival, four-color, location photography along with ingredient information make the Big Easy easy to tackle in home kitchens. Cooks will salivate over the 200 recipes that honor and celebrate everything New Orleans.
Bite by bite John Besh brings us New Orleans cooking like we've never tasted before. It's the perfect blend of contemporary French techniques with indigenous Southern Louisiana products and know-how. His amazing new offering is exclusively brought to fans and foodies everywhere by Andrews McMeel.

From Mardi Gras, to the shrimp season, to the urban garden, to gumbo weather, boucherie (the season of the pig), and everything tasty in between, Besh gives a sampling of New Orleans that will have us all craving for more.

The boy from the Bayou isn't just an acclaimed chef with an exceptional pallet. Besh is a chef with a heart. The ex-marine's passion for the Crescent City, its people, and its livelihood are main courses making him a leader of the city's culinary recovery and resilience after the wrath of Hurricane Katrina.


Alisa (MsTaz) | 5301 comments There is no disputing Julia Child.
The Way to Cook by Julia Child by Julia ChildJulia Child
In this magnificent new cookbook, illustrated with full color throughout, Julia Child give us her magnum opus the distillation of a lifetime of cooking. And she has an important message for Americans today. . .

to the health-conscious: make a habit of good home cooking so that you know you are working with the best and freshest ingredients and you can be in control of what goes into every dish
�to the new generation of cooks who have not grown up in the old traditions: learn the basics and understand what you are doing so cooking can be easier, faster, and more enjoyable
�to the more experienced cook: have fun improvising and creating your own versions of traditional dishes
and to all of us: above all, enjoy the pleasures of the table.

In this spirit, Julia has conceived her most creative and instructive cookbook, blending classic techniques with free-style American cooking and with added emphasis on lightness, freshness, and simpler preparations. Breaking with conventional organization, she structures the chapters (from Soups to Cakes & Cookies) around master recipes, giving all the reassuring details that she is so good at and grouping the recipes according to method; these are followed�in shorthand form�by innumerable variations that are easily made once the basics are understood.

For example, make her simple but impeccably prepared sauté of chicken, and before long you're easily whipping up Chicken with Mushrooms and Cream, Chicken Provençale, Chicken Pipérade, or Chicken Marengo. Or master her perfect broiled butterflied chicken, and next time DeviledRabbit or Split Cornish Game Hens Broiled with Cheese will be on your menu.

In all, there are more than 800 recipes, including the variations�from a treasure trove of poultry and fish recipes and a vast array of fresh vegetables prepared in new ways to bread doughs (that can be turned into pizzas and calzones and hamburger buns) and delicious indulgences, such as Caramel Apple Mountain or a Queen of Sheba Chocolate Almond Cake with Chocolate Leaves. And if you want to know how a finished dish should look or how to angle your knife or to fashion a pretty rosette on that cake, there are more than 600 color photographs to entice and instruct you along the way.

A one-of-a-kind, brilliant, and inspiring book from the incomparable Julia, which is bound to rekindle interest in the satisfactions of good home cooking.

and one of her other classics ~
Mastering the Art of French Cooking (Vol. 1) by Julia Child Julia ChildJulia Child


message 4: by Bentley, Group Founder, Leader, Chief (new)

Bentley | 24010 comments That sounds like a great cookbook for me since I was able to sample some New Orleans food recently. Cookbooks exemplify much of the cultural nuances of a location.

Thank you for those adds.


Alisa (MsTaz) | 5301 comments Glad you find them useful. I will have more for this thread. :D


message 6: by Bentley, Group Founder, Leader, Chief (new)

Bentley | 24010 comments Julia Child is around in our house (cookbooks)...but we relied more on Fanny Farmer for the everyday cooking.

The Fannie Farmer Cookbook  Anniversary by Marion CunninghamMarion Cunningham

Very reliable and you cannot go wrong.

Julia ChildJulia Child


message 7: by André (last edited May 27, 2011 11:27AM) (new)

André (AndrH) | 2338 comments Two of my favorites on Italian cooking:

Twelve  A Tuscan Cookbook by Tessa KirosTwelve: A Tuscan Cookbook by Tessa Kiros

A terrific book. The author traveled through Italy, basically looking into people's pots and asking for the recipes. Very down to earth and VERY GOOD COOKING!!!

Diary of a Tuscan Chef by Cesare CasellaDiary of a Tuscan Chef by Cesare Casella

More class than the first one, but still very family/tradition orientated, with lots of love and even more tomato sauce...
FANTASTIC cooking


message 8: by Bentley, Group Founder, Leader, Chief (new)

Bentley | 24010 comments Andre, those cookbooks look very good. Thank you very much for sharing them with all of us.


André (AndrH) | 2338 comments Sure, Bentley.
I looooove to cook, but I'm bad with cookbooks in the way that I often don't stick to the recipes and change things while cooking, a bit like the Swedish Chef from the Muppet show, humming, singing, tasting, opening a bottle of wine (or sherry for the sauce), add an eggplant there - what, the recipe did not include eggplant and capers - who cares, I think I like it...


message 10: by Bentley, Group Founder, Leader, Chief (new)

Bentley | 24010 comments Very funny - that sounds like my grandmother.


André (AndrH) | 2338 comments Bentley wrote: "Very funny - that sounds like my grandmother."

I take that as a compliment (smile)


message 12: by Bentley, Group Founder, Leader, Chief (new)

Bentley | 24010 comments Of course - she was the best cook I knew.


message 13: by Jill, Assisting Moderator - Global NF, HF, European/Brit. Hist/Music (new)

Jill Hutchinson (Bucs1960) | 6976 comments I love to cook and love to read cookbooks even if I don't use the recipes. My two favorites are old standbys:

Good Housekeeping Family Cook Book by Mildred Maddocks byMildred Maddocks

The All New, All Purpose Joy of Cooking by Irma S. Rombauer by Irma S. Rombauer (Irma Rombauer)


message 14: by Bentley, Group Founder, Leader, Chief (new)

Bentley | 24010 comments You are pretty close Jill - good old college try.

The All New, All Purpose Joy of Cooking by Irma S. Rombauer by Irma S. RombauerIrma S. Rombauer

Three parts for book citations: bookcover (you have it); author's photo (you have that too) ;but on the third part we had a problem - you need to add the author's name as linkable text (the link part of the author add).


message 15: by Jill, Assisting Moderator - Global NF, HF, European/Brit. Hist/Music (new)

Jill Hutchinson (Bucs1960) | 6976 comments Darn, Bentley........I have been doing well but goofed again. I apologize


message 16: by Bryan, Assisting Moderator - Presidential Series (new)

Bryan Craig | 10532 comments This book has some original Jefferson and Jefferson family recipes, the rest are more modern incarnations of period recipes:

(no image) Thomas Jefferson's Cookbook by Marie Kimball


message 17: by Bryan, Assisting Moderator - Presidential Series (new)

Bryan Craig | 10532 comments The Virginia Housewife  Or Methodical Cook  A Facsimile of an Authentic Early American Cookbook by Mary Randolph by Mary Randolph

Cookbook that first appeared in 1824 and written by Mrs. Mary Randolph, married to her cousin David Meade Randolph who was a Virginian landowner and farmer, and who was later designated Federal Marshall for Virginia through the influence of his cousin, Thomas Jefferson.


Becky (groundhawg) The New Food Lover's Companion by Sharon Tyler Herbst by Sharon Herbst (who is apparently not on Goodreads at all?).

Absolute must have for the kitchen!


message 19: by Bentley, Group Founder, Leader, Chief (new)

Bentley | 24010 comments Becky, the author is on goodreads but with her middle name. Goodreads sometimes needs to exact (smile).

The New Food Lover's Companion by Sharon Tyler Herbst by Sharon Tyler Herbst(no author's photo available)

Great add Becky and thank you.


message 20: by Darrell (last edited Jan 24, 2012 02:56PM) (new)

Darrell Delamaide | 4 comments Hi, I've had a couple of good recipes so far from The Italian Farmer's Table  Authentic Recipes and Local Lore from Northern Italy by Matthew Scialabba by Matthew Scialabba and Melissa Pellegrino. They went around to farms in Northern Italy that take in paying guests and collected authentic recipes from them.


Sharon Ferguson (Esgaroth) | 3 comments I highly recommend a (fairly) new book : Tea With Bea, from Bea's of Bloomsbury in London, England. FANTASTIC scones...I know because Ive been there to try them out for myself.


message 22: by Bentley, Group Founder, Leader, Chief (new)

Bentley | 24010 comments This cookbook has had some rave reviews; I may take a ride and get a copy.

My Father's Daughter by Gwyneth Paltrow by Gwyneth PaltrowGwyneth Paltrow

Synopsis:

Read the article in the Atlantic

http://www.theatlantic.com/health/arc...


message 23: by Bentley, Group Founder, Leader, Chief (last edited Jan 24, 2012 04:17PM) (new)

Bentley | 24010 comments Hello Sharon,

Scones are a favorite of mine.

But having said that, please make sure to follow our rules for citations.

The HBC citation rules state that you must add the book cover, the author's photo when available and always the author's link. We do have a thread called Mechanics of the Board which is in the Help Desk folder which may help you out a bit.

Here is how your citation should have looked:

Tea With Bea by Bea Vo by Bea Vo (no author's photo available)


message 24: by Bentley, Group Founder, Leader, Chief (last edited Jan 24, 2012 04:20PM) (new)

Bentley | 24010 comments Darrell wrote: "Hi, I've had a couple of good recipes so far from The Italian Farmer's Table  Authentic Recipes and Local Lore from Northern Italy by Matthew Scialabba by Matthew Scialabba and [aut..."

That looks like a fab book Darrell; may pick that up at the same time.

Good job with the citation.


message 25: by Jill, Assisting Moderator - Global NF, HF, European/Brit. Hist/Music (new)

Jill Hutchinson (Bucs1960) | 6976 comments This cookbook is not for everyone!!!! Hilarious look at how to cook roadkill that you may find on the back roads of your state. Just remember, it has to be fresh!!!

The Original Road Kill Cookbook

The Original Road Kill Cookbook by Buck Peterson by Buck Peterson (no photo)

Synopsis:

The Original Road Kill Cookbook is an outrageous, devastating response to the call of the open road. It is the ingenious solution sought by the free-spirited American who wants to participate in Mother Nature's bounty. It doesn't matter if you drive an off-road 4 x 4 or a delicate, aging Plymouth-Road Kill will help you by telling you where to find this highway supermarket, what to do while there, and how to fix your yellowline yummies.


message 26: by Bentley, Group Founder, Leader, Chief (new)

Bentley | 24010 comments I think I am going to get sick


message 27: by Jill, Assisting Moderator - Global NF, HF, European/Brit. Hist/Music (new)

Jill Hutchinson (Bucs1960) | 6976 comments Amazing, isn't it and it actually happens. I don't think I ever had the desire to gather up a deer that had been hit by a car and take it home to cook!!!!


message 28: by Bentley, Group Founder, Leader, Chief (new)

Bentley | 24010 comments Oh goodness - I just cannot imagine it and do not want to even try.


André (AndrH) | 2338 comments Jill wrote: "Amazing, isn't it!!!!"

Since tomatoes and carrots usually don't go out for walkies does everything need to be run over to end up in this book ... or does the writer accept you get your groceries the usual way? (smile)...


André (AndrH) | 2338 comments Cooking with Italian Grandmothers  Recipes and Stories from Tuscany to Sicily by Jessica Theroux byJessica Theroux

A wonderful book. Nice recipes with a few pages of travel writing thrown in.


message 31: by Bentley, Group Founder, Leader, Chief (new)

Bentley | 24010 comments I wanted this thread to be appetizing not one for weight watchers who are trying not to eat because they all of a sudden feel sick.


message 32: by Bentley, Group Founder, Leader, Chief (new)

Bentley | 24010 comments André wrote: "Cooking with Italian Grandmothers  Recipes and Stories from Tuscany to Sicily by Jessica Theroux byJessica Theroux

A wonderful book. Nice recipes with a few pages of travel writing thrown in."


Andre, now that is more like it.


message 33: by Jill, Assisting Moderator - Global NF, HF, European/Brit. Hist/Music (new)

Jill Hutchinson (Bucs1960) | 6976 comments I will redeem myself with a great cookbook recommendation. If you have ever been to Amish country, you know that their down home recipes are not to be missed. Easy to prepare and easier to eat.......great food.


Amish Friend's Cookbook

Wanda E, Brunstetter's Amish Friends Cookbook by Wanda E. Brunstetter by Wanda E. BrunstetterWanda E. Brunstetter

Synopsis:

New, from Barbour's best-selling author of fiction, Wanda E. Brunstetter, is the must-have cookbook of the season. Her Amish Friends Cookbook collection is a treasure trove of recipes and interesting facts from the heart of Amish country. With recipes divided into sections including breads and rolls, desserts, main dishes, sides, jams and jellies-and more!-you'll find only the best of home cooking between the pages of this delightful book. As an added bonus, you'll find featured facts about Amish life preceding each section of mouth-watering recipes. Topped off by one amazing package and an even more amazing price, cooks of all ages will have a hard time passing this one up!


message 34: by Bentley, Group Founder, Leader, Chief (new)

Bentley | 24010 comments You are going to have to add 100 great cookbooks to make up for that particular one which we will not mention.


message 35: by Alisa (last edited Aug 01, 2013 08:21PM) (new)

Alisa (MsTaz) | 5301 comments The cookbook everybody is talking about right now.

Jerusalem: A Cookbook

Jerusalem  A Cookbook by Yotam Ottolenghi by Yotam OttolenghiYotam Ottolenghi

Synopsis:

A collection of 120 recipes exploring the flavors of Jerusalem from the New York Times bestselling author of Plenty, one of the most lauded cookbooks of 2011.

In Jerusalem, Yotam Ottolenghi and Sami Tamimi explore the vibrant cuisine of their home city—with its diverse Muslim, Jewish, and Christian communities. Both men were born in Jerusalem in the same year—Tamimi on the Arab east side and Ottolenghi in the Jewish west. This stunning cookbook offers 120 recipes from their unique cross-cultural perspective, from inventive vegetable dishes to sweet, rich desserts. With five bustling restaurants in London and two stellar cookbooks, Ottolenghi is one of the most respected chefs in the world; in Jerusalem, he and Tamimi have collaborated to produce their most personal cookbook yet.


Alisa (MsTaz) | 5301 comments This is more about the chef rather than an actual cookbook, but arguably one of the premier chefs anywhere. His cooking is extraordinary, and like his good friend Julia Child, quite accessible to the everyday home cook. He turned down an opportunity to be The White House chef for the Kennedy administration to work at Howard Johnson. He eventually went onto open the restaurant at the top of the World Trade Center, and many more achievements to follow since then.

The Apprentice: My Life in the Kitchen

The Apprentice  My Life in the Kitchen by Jacques Pépin by Jacques PépinJacques Pépin

Synopsis:

A wise and charming memoir from a man who quickly ascended the ranks of American cooks to become, according to Julia Child, "the best chef in America"

With sparkling wit, occasional humility, and a delightfully curated selection of recipes, Jacques Pépin tells the captivating story of his rise from a terrified thirteen-year-old toiling in an Old World French kitchen to an American superstar—he was one of the earliest pioneers of culinary television—who changed American tastes with his culinary wizardry and ad-libbed charm. The Apprentice begins in prewar France, with young Jacques cutting his teeth in his mother’s small restaurants. When he moves to Paris, we see tantalizing glimpses of Sartre and Genet, and in his role as Charles de Gaulle’s personal chef, Jacques witnesses history from a remarkable vantage point behind the swinging kitchen door. In America, he rejects an offer to be chef in the Kennedy White House, choosing instead to work at Howard Johnson’s, and then joins forces with fellow food lovers Julia Child, James Beard, and Craig Claiborne to make some history of his own. In the words of Anthony Bourdain, it's an instant classic.


message 37: by Bentley, Group Founder, Leader, Chief (new)

Bentley | 24010 comments I was afraid to look when I saw this come up on my list of having a new post since Jill's post awhile ago. This actually sounds quite good compared to that one.


message 38: by Jill, Assisting Moderator - Global NF, HF, European/Brit. Hist/Music (last edited Aug 17, 2013 05:46PM) (new)

Jill Hutchinson (Bucs1960) | 6976 comments Bentley, you know you secretly crave reading that cookbook that shall remain nameless!!!! :0)

Let me make one more try to redeem myself from causing you nausea.

Pennsylvania Dutch Cooking: A Mennonite Community Cookbook

Pennsylvania Dutch Cooking  A Mennonite Community Cookbook by Mary E. Showalter by Mary E. Showalter

Synopsis:

Over 1,100 mouth-watering recipes are in this fabulous collection of favorites contributed by Mennonite families from all over the United States and Canada. All the recipes have been brought up-to-date for directions and measurements so whether it's oyster chowder or apple fritters, or the many main dishes and desserts that make Mennonite cooking so delicious, all of them can be enjoyed by the modern cook.


message 39: by Bentley, Group Founder, Leader, Chief (new)

Bentley | 24010 comments No, I have a delicate stomach and I cannot bear thinking about it so I cringe whenever there is another post here for fear???? - that you might have done it again.

I am so glad that you have turned over a new leaf.


Alisa (MsTaz) | 5301 comments New Orleans, has it all: - history, music, and great food.

Treme: The Cookbook: In The Kitchen with the Stars of the Award-Winning HBO Series

Treme  The Cookbook  In The Kitchen with the Stars of the Award-Winning HBO Series by Lolis Eric Elie by Lolis Eric Elie (no photo)

Synopsis:

Inspired by David Simon's award-winning HBO series Treme, this celebration of the culinary spirit of post-Katrina New Orleans features recipes and tributes from the characters, real and fictional, who highlight the Crescent City's rich foodways. From chef Janette Desautel's own Crawfish Ravioli and LaDonna Batiste-Williams's Smothered Turnip Soup to the city's finest Sazerac, New Orleans' cuisine is a mélange of influences from Creole to Vietnamese, at once new and old, genteel and down-home, and, in the words of Toni Bernette, "seasoned with delicious nostalgia." As visually rich as the series itself, the book includes 100 heritage and contemporary recipes from the city's heralded restaurants such as Upperline, Bayona, Restaurant August, and Herbsaint, plus original recipes from renowned chefs Eric Ripert, David Chang, and other Treme guest stars. For the 6 million who come to New Orleans each year for its food and music, this is the ultimate homage to the traditions that make it one of the world's greatest cities.


Krystal (queenravenclaw) | 330 comments Too tired to bother looking through the titles my mom has. But I will mention this one since I bought it for her for Christmas last year The Chew  Food. Life. Fun. by Peter Kaminskyby Peter Kaminsky. My cousin was also going to get it for my grandma but she said don't bother. My mom loved it.


message 42: by Jill, Assisting Moderator - Global NF, HF, European/Brit. Hist/Music (new)

Jill Hutchinson (Bucs1960) | 6976 comments Almost every kitchen in the USA has this cookbook or an earlier edition. It is a classic!!

Better Homes and Gardens New Cook Book

Better Homes and Gardens New Cook Book   by Better Homes and Gardens by Better Homes and Gardens (no photo)

Synopsis

-- 1,259 recipes that reflect current American eating habits.
-- More than 588 color photos, including step-by-step photos of intricate techniques.
-- Basics chapter includes ingredient identification, 14 menus, information on how to use the Food Guide Pyramid, low-fat cooking tips, table-setting information, and guide to cooking terms and techniques.
-- Color bars on every page match color-coded chapter tabs.
-- Every recipe has been tested in the Better Homes and Gardens "RM" Test Kitchen.


Denise Morse | 4 comments My two are already mentioned but I agree with Joy of Cooking and the Better Homes and Gardens cookbook.

I think the next generation might answer:
How to Cook Everything by Mark Bittman


message 44: by Jill, Assisting Moderator - Global NF, HF, European/Brit. Hist/Music (last edited Sep 27, 2013 09:07AM) (new)

Jill Hutchinson (Bucs1960) | 6976 comments Denise.....there are so many great cookbooks out there but some are classics aren't they?

Don't forget to use the book citations:

The Joy of Cooking by Irma S. Rombauer by Irma S. RombauerIrma S. Rombauer
Better Homes and Gardens New Cook Book   by Better Homes and Gardens by Better Homes and Gardens (no photo)
How to Cook Everything  The Basics  Simple Recipes Anyone Can Cook by Mark Bittman by Mark BittmanMark Bittman

You can review the book citation guidelines at the following link:

http://www.goodreads.com/topic/show/2...


message 45: by Bentley, Group Founder, Leader, Chief (new)

Bentley | 24010 comments Thank you Jill for helping out Denise.

@Denise - you might want to give an edit to message 43 and try to add the citations. We are here to help and every attempt gets you closer to learning how it is done. We are very very patient and will assist you along the way. Nothing to be afraid of.


Carol (cannes23) | 6 comments A la Mere de Famille, a renowned Parisian confectioner, has been in business since the 1700's! This is the first cookbook in its 250-year history. The book includes dozens of wonderful candy and cookie recipes, some easy and some more advanced. The book itself is a work of art. Printed on beautiful paper, it includes bits of the store's history, gorgeous photos and prints, and even copies of old receipts. The marzipan recipe was simple and simply delicious.

A la Mere de Famille  Recipes from the Beloved Parisian Confectioner by Julien Merceron by Julien Merceron (no photo)


message 47: by Kathy, Assisting Moderator - Health/Med/Science, Ancient History (new)

Kathy (Kathy_H) | 2091 comments Thanks for tip, Carol. And glad you finally found the book to cite. Great job on the citation too.


message 48: by happy (last edited Jun 11, 2014 09:54PM) (new)

happy (happyone) | 52 comments My wife and I were going through my Father--in-laws home other week in preparation for selling it, and we found some old cook books including a 1943 edition of this classic

The Joy of Cooking by Irma S. Rombauer by Irma S. Rombauer Irma S. Rombauer

Synopsis:

It's been fascinating leafing through it. I don't recognize a few ingrediants (what exactly is rich milk) in some of the recipes and few of the recipes look down right nasty :)

there is actually a recipe for Canned French Fries (which she says is rather tasty, but lets say I'm a bit dubious)

Some observations

She uses paprika almost as a substitute for black pepper. Paprika is probably used in more that 50% of the entre recipes and when it is used black pepper is not.

when frying/sauteeing her oil of choice is bacon drippings, which I understand totally :)

Some of the recipes read almost like what you would find in your Grandmothers hand written family cook book
She also includes a recipe for the Japanese dish of Suki Yaki. I found that a touch suprising.


message 49: by Bentley, Group Founder, Leader, Chief (new)

Bentley | 24010 comments Odd about the paprika - my mother used a lot of paprika too.

I bet that cookbook was full of surprises. Great job with the format and citation.


back to top