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Kindle Books Outsell All Paper on Amazon

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message 1: by Betsy (new)

Betsy | 329 comments Amazon announced today that Kindle books now outsell hardbacks and paperbacks combined:

CNN Article


message 2: by P.M. (new)

P.M. Richter (PamelaRichter) | 74 comments Thanks Betsy - isn't it neat? The news is all over the forums and blogs today. Yay for Kindle!


message 3: by Chrissie (new)

Chrissie Maybe now they will begin reducing prices?! Yes, I adore my Kindle. Thanks for letting us know!


message 4: by Colin (new)

Colin Taber Changing times! Thanks for the article link. Very interesting.


message 5: by stormhawk (new)

stormhawk | 539 comments I admit it. It's completely my fault.


message 6: by Ralph (last edited May 20, 2011 07:51AM) (new)

Ralph (sunwriter) | 327 comments Mod
Don't you love it when the news reports false information? Makes me less inclined to trust them when they write things like "Of course, these stats only represent sales of books on Amazon.com, the only place consumers can buy e-books for the Kindle." which is 100% false.


message 7: by Chris (new)

Chris Stanley (christinelstanley) stormhawk wrote: "I admit it. It's completely my fault."

So glad it's your fault, my husband thinks it's mine! :-)


message 8: by IUHoosier (new)

IUHoosier | 93 comments Chris wrote: "stormhawk wrote: "I admit it. It's completely my fault."

So glad it's your fault, my husband thinks it's mine! :-)"


So does mine! I'll have to tell him it's all stormhawk, not me :)


message 9: by John (new)

John (crucislancer) Ralph wrote: "Don't you love it when the news reports false information? Makes me less inclined to trust them when they write things like "Of course, these stats only represent sales of books on Amazon.com, the ..."

This is true. I've purchased books from other sites, like smashwords.com for instance.


message 10: by stormhawk (new)

stormhawk | 539 comments IUHoosier wrote: "Chris wrote: "stormhawk wrote: "I admit it. It's completely my fault."

So glad it's your fault, my husband thinks it's mine! :-)"

So does mine! I'll have to tell him it's all stormhawk, not me ..."


I am happy to take one for the team.


message 11: by stormhawk (new)

stormhawk | 539 comments From the article: Given that people seem to spend more and more of their time peering at glowing electronic screens, this was probably bound to happen.

The Kindle doesn't glow. I mean, I glow with happiness when I use mine, but that's not the same thing.


message 12: by Kasi (new)

Kasi Blake (KCBlake) | 11 comments Great news! I have an ebook there, and I haven't even had to market it. People just seem to find it.


message 13: by *Dr (new)

*Dr  DLN (DrDLN) | 12 comments In general kindle or ebooks are less expensive than printed versions. Because there is minimal cost to download and no shipping is involved.

For example, the printed books that sell for over $20 are less than $5. http://amzn.to/dMBLWW


message 14: by Frederick (new)

Frederick Brooke (FrederickLeeBrooke) | 32 comments K.C. wrote: "Great news! I have an ebook there, and I haven't even had to market it. People just seem to find it."

Same here. My book on Kindle is selling well. Everybody has a funny bone. I'm grateful that Kindle makes it possible for so many people to easily access my book.


message 15: by Anthony (new)

Anthony Schmitz | 22 comments Does make me wonder what the inevitable next step will be. So now you can download most books in a few heartbeats without leaving your home. What's the next level of expectation? Music, images and voices integrated into the text? Plot threads that may or may not be followed, depending on the reader's level of interest in certain characters or scenarios? There are all sorts of interesting ways that technology could influence content, and, I suppose, all sorts of ways that traditionalists and brave-new-worlders will be able to butt heads.


message 16: by Chrissie (new)

Chrissie Amazon can skip all the fancy add-ons and instead :

1. lower the prices
2. increase the number of books that can be leant and
3. have more books available, even for us living outside the US!

That is what I want.


message 17: by Helen (new)

Helen | 584 comments Lower prices is on my list! Although manipulating the plot line could be fun!


message 18: by Clare K. R. (new)

Clare K. R. (Clare-Dragonfly) | 111 comments Chrissie wrote: "Amazon can skip all the fancy add-ons and instead :

1. lower the prices
2. increase the number of books that can be leant and
3. have more books available, even for us living outside the US!
..."


But Amazon doesn't control those things! Actually Amazon wouldn't control any of those other fancy add-ons either. That's all up to the publishers and authors.


message 19: by Chrissie (new)

Chrissie Clare-Dragonfly, I beg to differ. There are contracts between Amazon, the publishers and the authors! These contracts determine how the money is split between ALL the partners!


message 20: by Ralph (new)

Ralph (sunwriter) | 327 comments Mod
Chrissie wrote: "Clare-Dragonfly, I beg to differ. There are contracts between Amazon, the publishers and the authors! These contracts determine how the money is split between ALL the partners!"

Authors sign no contracts with Amazon. The contracts and signed between an author and a publisher. I'm not sure what kind of contract Amazon signs with a publisher.

But Amazon absolutely has no control over those things. Publishers do. Publishers set the price due to Apple forcing the Agency Model on everyone. Publishers determine how many times a book can be lent. Since they'd rather people buy the book rather than just borrow it from a friend, they're limiting this.

Most big name US publishers only purchase North American rights. This means they legally cannot offer the book for sale in the UK or anywhere outside of the US, Canada, and Mexico. Some smaller publishers ask for world-wide rights, which gives them the ability to put their ebooks out there for anyone to purchase.

But if you look at most books coming from the big NY publishers - Harper Collins, Scholastic, Penguin, Random House, etc. - the UK versions of those books are published with a different publisher. Authors can make more money selling their books to multiple publishers for multiple markets that way.

Amazon absolutely cannot override and author's contract with the publisher.


message 21: by Helen (new)

Helen | 584 comments I think with the increase of e-readers, the publishers will seek for world rights as buying an
e-book from any country should be easy with the internet.


message 22: by Clare K. R. (last edited May 25, 2011 05:25PM) (new)

Clare K. R. (Clare-Dragonfly) | 111 comments Chrissie wrote: "Clare-Dragonfly, I beg to differ. There are contracts between Amazon, the publishers and the authors! These contracts determine how the money is split between ALL the partners!"

Yes, that's exactly right ;) OK, actually it's not quite right--the contracts signed between Amazon and the publishers determine how the money is split between Amazon and the publisher, while the contracts signed between the publishers and the authors determine how the money is split between the publishers and the authors.

Regardless, the publisher sets the price. What is agreed between Amazon and the publisher is what percentage of the price the publisher gets (generally 70%). I don't know if you were aware of the huge fight between Amazon and Macmillan, but prior to that Amazon was setting ebook prices. Macmillan decided it wanted to set its own ebook prices, and in retaliation Amazon made all Macmillan ebooks un-purchaseable. Customers protested, Macmillan wouldn't back down, and eventually Amazon had to allow the agency model, meaning the publisher sets the price. That's now standard.

Publishers actually are trying to get world rights already. The books that are more widely available won't start coming out for a year or so, though.


message 23: by Chrissie (new)

Chrissie Whether the partners all sit around one table is not the point. Clearly, how the money is split between them is a matter of negotiation between these partners. Each partner is seeking their own gain.

Calm down, those of you affiliated with Amzon. I am merely expressing my "dreams". Some want music and jingles, etc. Me, what I want are lower prices, more lendable books and more books to be available on Kindle for readers worldwide. I do not think I am alone. Why can't I have my "dreams" no matter how crazy they are?! (Chuckle)

I think Amazon offers an excellent product and excellent service! That costs too. I am sure that Amazon also wants to know the opinions of its customers.

I am signing out!


message 24: by Frederick (new)

Frederick Brooke (FrederickLeeBrooke) | 32 comments Chrissie wrote: "Whether the partners all sit around one table is not the point. Clearly, how the money is split between them is a matter of negotiation between these partners. Each partner is seeking their own ga..."

Chrissie, I think your dreams are way more than reasonable. Let's all keep in mind that we're talking about products and services that have only been around for a very short time, two or three years. It takes time to work out the kinks. The good news is the incredible level of interactivity. Feedback like this is being heard. Isn't it great that readers can find each other like this and share thoughts and experiences? Oops, now I've outed myself as a perpetual optimist.


message 25: by Anthony (new)

Anthony Schmitz | 22 comments Chrissie wrote: "Me, what I want are lower prices, more lendable books and more books to be available on Kindle for readers worldwide.

Just curious what a reasonable price seems to be. More for an eBook released by a traditional publisher? Less for an independently published eBook? How many times do you want to be able to give the book away?


message 26: by Helen (new)

Helen | 584 comments I want it to be less than a paperback at least - I'd expect it to be substantially less as production and transport costs are cut.

Amazon is expanding again in Scotland another few hundred jobs announced.


message 27: by Stuart (new)

Stuart Jaffe | 9 comments Hi all, my first post to this group!

As an author, I can assure you that we get no say in the pricing of books (unless we self-publish or happen to be a really big name). However, talking with publishers has brought to light a few factors I hadn't considered before. The biggie--for now, publishers don't heavily reduce ebook prices because they don't want to cannibalize their print book sales--which still make up the bulk of their sales (outside of amazon). Who knows what the future holds, but I believe that once ebooks outweigh print in all major markets, then customer pressure has a chance of reducing price. As long as we don't become accepting to the inflated price. There's going to be a lot of big changes in the next few years -- some publishers will go under and others will rise. If we, the consumer, stay on top of it all, we may just benefit in the long run. At least, I hope so!


message 28: by Frederick (new)

Frederick Brooke (FrederickLeeBrooke) | 32 comments I'm an author who has self-published on Kindle. For certain books, including mine, the price has to lie between $2.99 and $9.99. The author can set the price as s/he sees fit within this band. I set mine at $6.00 because I thought that was already steeply discounted compared to standard printed book prices, even paperback prices.
Doing Max Vinyl


message 29: by Helen (new)

Helen | 584 comments That's interesting Stuart, I suppose the sale of indy authors will encourage cheaper prices with time


message 30: by Stuart (new)

Stuart Jaffe | 9 comments Possible, Helen, but it really depends on consumers. While the indy publishing world is drastically changing and potentially changing publishing as a whole, its effect on traditional publishing has been minimal so far. There have been some breakout stars, of course, and I'm not trying to say anything negative about indy publishing (especially because I'm getting my first indy book put together right now!), but publishers won't just let the indies takeover. The indy way has finally found a platform to be viable but it won't topple the big boys. However, I know a lot of mid-list authors are re-issuing their backlists on their own, and that might change things too. So many factors involved, I'm wary of any blanket statements -- even my own!


message 31: by Helen (new)

Helen | 584 comments I wonder if Amazon's statement will get publishers rethinking their pricing policy or encourage them to stick with it.


message 32: by Michael (new)

Michael Mora (frelling_cute) | 8 comments The last time I remember this type of greed was when Record companies used to charge more and more for CD's every year. And then people started illegally downloading the record companies couldn't figure out why.
Kindle books should be less but these gotta take every dollar they can from you.


message 33: by Horror (new)

Horror Reviewer | 4 comments I've been downloading about two books a week. Getting behind on my reviews, but I think once people buy a Kindle they'll be hooked like me.


message 34: by Vicki (new)

Vicki Hinze (vickihinze) | 96 comments And I've done my share to support it! LOL.


message 35: by Helen (new)

Helen | 584 comments I must have 40-50 books on mine altogether and that is since late Feb. I wouldn't have had time to go spend that in a shop with work. So I'm definitely buying more. Some super bargains too from previously unknown writers.


message 36: by Kris (new)

Kris Ball (krisuk) | 8 comments Helen wrote: "I must have 40-50 books on mine altogether and that is since late Feb. I wouldn't have had time to go spend that in a shop with work. So I'm definitely buying more. Some super bargains too from pre..."

I'm not far behind you. Read a lot more books with the Kindle than I would have done without. It's also useful I can read what I have on my Kindle on my phone. Comes in handy at work!


message 37: by Olivia (new)

Olivia (oerose) I wasn't surprised when I heard this news. According to my family and friends, though, I was the only one. Yeah right.


message 38: by Chrissie (new)

Chrissie Anthony and Frederik, excuse me for not answering sooner. No computer in the interim!

Fredrick, a dream is a dream. It is great that these open discussions are possible! I DO believe that prices for ebooks will drop if customer make their views known.

Anthony, I agree with Helen; an ebook should not cost more than a paperback. Concerning lending, I am simply annoyed that so many new books may not be lent, not even once! I pay the same as a hardcover and with a hardcover or paperback I can lend the book!


message 39: by Gail (new)

Gail Baugniet | 30 comments eBooks aren't just for the rich, or the eccentric, or the lonely! They are for EVERYONE. I love hearing about a new book, checking it out, deciding I like it, buying it, and starting to read it ... all within minutes.
What a country, what a world.


message 40: by Frederick (new)

Frederick Brooke (FrederickLeeBrooke) | 32 comments Gail, I couldn't agree more. A few days ago someone told me I should read Our Mutual Friend, by Mr. Dickens. A book, I must confess, I had never heard of. I downloaded it onto my Kindle -- for free -- and started reading. Now I am back in the gritty London streets of the late 1800s, and what a hilarious tale!


message 41: by Lisa (last edited Jun 14, 2011 08:02AM) (new)

Lisa Grace (LisaGraceBooks) | 21 comments I think publishers are beginning to lower the prices of ebooks. What they're are finding out is if they lower the price to say 99 cents on a book that is a year or two old and the author has a new release, people will not only buy the older book, but splurge for the new one.
My first book is now selling for 99 cents and Book 2 releases July 1st and it will sell for only 2.99.


message 42: by Christopher (new)

Christopher Brennan | 19 comments I would absolutely love to see some comparison numbers on specific titles. Or between all titles that exist in both formats.

After all, Amazon has a huge number of authors only publishing on Kindle. I'd like to see if the skew to ebooks is because of the popularity of those titles, or is something you can say is a consumer choice between two versions of the same titles.


message 43: by Lisa (new)

Lisa Grace (LisaGraceBooks) | 21 comments Christopher - It would be interesting to see. I know my hardcover is still selling but my ebook is doing better. I have an agent looking at selling the paperback rights.


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