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message 1: by Bentley, Group Founder, Leader, Chief (new)

Bentley | 23983 comments This is a thread to discuss the history of American Football.


Alisa (MsTaz) | 5293 comments The movie will make you sob like a child and the book, although short, pretty much will have the same impact. It is more about the bonds of human relationships but really about football too.

Brian's Song (Screenplay) by William Blinn by William Blinn
Two men. Once names Gale Sayers, the other Brian Piccolo. They came from different parts of the country. They competed fiercely for the same job. One liked to talk; the other was shy. One was white; the other black. This is the story of how they came to know each other, fight each other, and help each other…


message 3: by Bryan, Assisting Moderator - Presidential Series (new)

Bryan Craig | 10322 comments This one looks interesting:

Pigskin  The Early Years of Pro Football by Robert W.  PetersonRobert W. Peterson

Amazon review:
While baseball's pastoral pace never lets us forget its past, football's martial-like essence seems forever fixed in the present. Yet, borne on the broad backs of men like Pudge Heffelfinger, Jim Thorpe, George Halas, Red Grange, Sammy Baugh, and Bronco Nagurski, football's history is filled with a legend, color, and personality as intriguing and all-American as that usually ascribed to baseball. Like a good offensive guard, Pigskin does yeoman-like work in the trenches, opening the right holes for football's barnstorming, step-child past to rush through. Thoroughly researched and authoritatively written, it helps resuscitate a sporting era--from the late 19th century to the dawn of saturation TV--when the passion for playing the game was far more alluring than all those soulless numbers on the business end of the dollar sign.


message 4: by Bryan, Assisting Moderator - Presidential Series (new)

Bryan Craig | 10322 comments And this one:

America's Game  The Epic Story of How Pro Football Captured a Nation by Michael MacCambridgeMichael MacCambridge

Publisher's Weekly:
MacCambridge's sweeping history of pro football starts just before WWII, when the National Football League was still largely a regional organization, and ends with Janet Jackson's wardrobe malfunction at Super Bowl XXXVIII. Though there are plenty of vivid descriptions of remarkable games, what sets this chronicle apart from a slew of other recent football books is the depth and breadth of its stories about players, coaches and owners. The centerpiece of this personal approach is the extensive portrait of the career of Pete Rozelle, who became the NFL's commissioner at 33 and initiated many of the measures that ensured the sport's cultural ascendancy, including a television deal that distributed revenue equally among all teams. MacCambridge (The Franchise: A History of Sports Illustrated Magazine) zeroes in on two sideline projects that might have made the greatest difference in football's rise over baseball: NFL Properties, which brought a consistent standard of excellence to fan paraphernalia; and NFL Films, which solidified the myth of the game as an epic struggle through the instantly recognizable narration of John Facenda. MacCambridge also considers the sport's track record regarding race relations, noting that the NFL's first black players were on the field months before Jackie Robinson, while highlighting the roles played by great African-American athletes like Paul Younger and Jim Brown. Though some fans may be disappointed that their favorite teams and players aren't extensively covered, this magisterial history is a fitting acknowledgment of the sport's legacy.
Copyright © Reed Business Information


message 5: by Bentley, Group Founder, Leader, Chief (new)

Bentley | 23983 comments Thank you so much for helping to build up the sports division here (smile). This folder once it is built up will be a very interesting group of threads.


message 6: by Bryan, Assisting Moderator - Presidential Series (new)

Bryan Craig | 10322 comments Bentley wrote: "Thank you so much for helping to build up the sports division here (smile). This folder once it is built up will be a very interesting group of threads."

Glad to help; I enjoy this genre and I agree, I think it will foster some good book suggestions and comments.


message 7: by Bryan, Assisting Moderator - Presidential Series (new)

Bryan Craig | 10322 comments I put this on my to read list:

Horns, Hogs, and Nixon Coming  Texas vs. Arkansas in Dixie's Last Stand by Terry FreiTerry Frei

Library Journal:
The December 1969 college football match between undefeated Texas and Arkansas was memorable, one for the record book. However, Frei's often humorous telling is much more than a rehash of the game. Attended by both President Nixon and future leader Bill Clinton, the game was also memorable for its combination of Southern pride and anti-Vietnam War protests. Frei's treatment also serves as a larger history of the social and political climate surrounding the competition. Frei, who currently writes for the Denver Post and contributes a weekly column to ESPN.com, is familiar with the mayhem of campus life in the Sixties; during this time his father was the head football coach at the University of Oregon. This delightful, well-researched chronicle of a turbulent era also includes an index, bibliography, rosters, and the 1969 results. Libraries should buy where demand warrants. Larry R. Little, Penticton P.L., B.C. Copyright 2002 Reed Business Information, Inc.


Nicole Junior Seau has died of a self-inflicted gun shot wound. Even though I was never a Charger's fan, I always enjoyed watching him play. My son's first ever football jersey was a Charger Seau jersey.

http://www.nytimes.com/2012/05/03/spo...


message 9: by Jill, Assisting Moderator - Global NF, HF, European/Brit. Hist/Music (last edited May 02, 2012 04:10PM) (new)

Jill Hutchinson (Bucs1960) | 6661 comments I was so saddened by the news as I enjoyed watching him play. He also did much charity work in San Diego as well as in Samoa. It makes one wonder what demons drove him to suicide since at this point there does not seem to be any apparent reason.


Alisa (MsTaz) | 5293 comments He was a great collegiate player, although I did not watch him as much in the NFL. Very sad.


message 11: by Bryan, Assisting Moderator - Presidential Series (new)

Bryan Craig | 10322 comments Wow, a great player. Sad.


Nicole I found this book in the new releases expected out in September, football from a much different perspective.

Soldiers First: Duty, Honor, Country, and Football at West Point

Soldiers First  Duty, Honor, Country, and Football at West Point by Joe Drapeby Joe DrapeJoe Drape

Synopsis
Bestselling author Joe Drape reveals the unique pressures and expectations that make a year of Army football so much more than just a tally of wins and losses.

The football team at the U.S. Military Academy is not like other college football teams. At other schools, athletes are catered to and coddled at every turn. At West Point, they carry the same arduous load as their fellow cadets, shouldering an Ivy League–caliber education and year-round military training. After graduation they are not going to the NFL but to danger zones halfway around the world. These young men are not just football players, they are soldiers first.

New York Times sportswriter Joe Drape takes us inside the world of Army football, as the Black Knights and their third-year coach, Rich Ellerson, seek to turn around a program that had recently fallen on hard times, with the goal to beat Navy and "sing last" at the Army-Navy game in December. The 2011 season would prove a true test of the players' mettle and perseverance.

Drawing on his extensive and unfettered access to the players and the coaching staff, Drape introduces us to this special group of young men and their achievements on and off the field. Anchoring the narrative and the team are five key players: quarterback Trent Steelman, the most gifted athlete; linebacker Steve Erzinger, who once questioned his place at West Point but has become a true leader; Andrew Rodriguez, the son of a general and the top scholar-athlete; Max Jenkins, the backup quarterback and the second-in-command of the Corps of Cadets; and Larry Dixon, a talented first-year running back. Together with Coach Ellerson, his staff, and West Point's officers and instructors, they and their teammates embrace the demands made on them and learn crucial lessons that will resonate throughout their lives—and ours.


Mike Gabor (mikeyppl) | 617 comments Giants Among Men  How Robustelli, Huff, Gifford, and the Giants Made New York a Football Town and Changed the NFL by Jack CavanaughJack Cavanaugh

This is a terrific book about the New York Giant teams of 1956 thru 1963.


Mark Mortensen Here is another good football book from an exciting era.


Carlisle vs. Army: Jim Thorpe, Dwight Eisenhower, Pop Warner, and the Forgotten Story of Football's Greatest Battle

Carlisle Vs. Army  Jim Thorpe, Dwight Eisenhower, Pop Warner, and the Forgotten Story of Football's Greatest Battle by Lars Anderson by Lars AndersonLars Anderson


Synopsis
A stunning work of narrative nonfiction, Carlisle vs. Army recounts the fateful 1912 gridiron clash that pitted one of America’s finest athletes, Jim Thorpe, against the man who would become one of the nation’s greatest heroes, Dwight D. Eisenhower. But beyond telling the tale of this momentous event, Lars Anderson also reveals the broader social and historical context of the match, lending it his unique perspectives on sports and culture at the dawn of the twentieth century.

This story begins with the infamous massacre of the Sioux at Wounded Knee, in 1890, then moves to rural Pennsylvania and the Carlisle Indian School, an institution designed to “elevate” Indians by uprooting their youths and immersing them in the white man’s ways. Foremost among those ways was the burgeoning sport of football. In 1903 came the man who would mold the Carlisle Indians into a juggernaut: Glenn “Pop” Warner, the son of a former Union Army captain. Guided by Warner, a tireless innovator and skilled manager, the Carlisle eleven barnstormed the country, using superior team speed, disciplined play, and tactical mastery to humiliate such traditional powerhouses as Harvard, Yale, Michigan, and Wisconsin–and to, along the way, lay waste American prejudices against Indians. When a troubled young Sac and Fox Indian from Oklahoma named Jim Thorpe arrived at Carlisle, Warner sensed that he was in the presence of greatness. While still in his teens, Thorpe dazzled his opponents and gained fans across the nation. In 1912 the coach and the Carlisle team could feel the national championship within their grasp.

Among the obstacles in Carlisle’s path to dominance were the Cadets of Army, led by a hardnosed Kansan back named Dwight Eisenhower. In Thorpe, Eisenhower saw a legitimate target; knocking the Carlisle great out of the game would bring glory both to the Cadets and to Eisenhower. The symbolism of this matchup was lost on neither Carlisle’s footballers nor on Indians across the country who followed their exploits. Less than a quarter century after Wounded Knee, the Indians would confront, on the playing field, an emblem of the very institution that had slaughtered their ancestors on the field of battle and, in defeating them, possibly regain a measure of lost honor.

Filled with colorful period detail and fascinating insights into American history and popular culture, Carlisle vs. Army gives a thrilling, authoritative account of the events of an epic afternoon whose reverberations would be felt for generations.


Alisa (MsTaz) | 5293 comments The story of the legendary Gale Sayres.

I am Third
I Am Third by Gale Sayers by Gale Sayers


message 16: by Jill, Assisting Moderator - Global NF, HF, European/Brit. Hist/Music (new)

Jill Hutchinson (Bucs1960) | 6661 comments Although an all around athlete, this book centers on Jim Thorpe's time at Carlisle Indian School where his football talent was recognized by the famous "Pop" Warner. It is an uplifting but sad story of one of the great athletes of the 20th century.

Jim Thorpe; Original All-American

Jim Thorpe, Original All-American by Joseph Bruchac by Joseph BruchacJoseph Bruchac

Synopsis
Jim Thorpe was one of the greatest athletes who ever lived. He played professional football, Major League Baseball, and won Olympic gold medals in track & field. But his life wasn’t an easy one. Born on the Sac and Fox Reservation in 1887, he encountered much family tragedy, and was sent as a young boy to various Indian boarding schools—strict, cold institutions that didn’t allow their students to hold on to their Native American languages and traditions. Jim ran away from school many times, until he found his calling at Pennsylvania’s Carlisle Indian School. There, the now-legendary coach Pop Warner recognized Jim’s athletic excellence and welcomed him onto the football and track teams.

Focusing on Jim Thorpe’s years at Carlisle, this book brings his early athletic career—and especially his college football days—to life, while also dispelling some myths about him and movingly depicting the Native American experience at the turn of the twentieth century. This is a book for history buffs as well as sports fans—an illuminating and lively read about a truly great American.


Alisa (MsTaz) | 5293 comments Growing Up Gronk: A Family's Story of Raising Champions

Growing Up Gronk  A Family's Story of Raising Champions by Gordon Gronkowski by Gordon Gronkowski (no photo)

Synopsis:

The Gronkowski family is a legitimate miracle. 5 towering brothers: Three who play in the NFL - a Denver Bronco, a Cleveland Brown and a record-breaking tight end with the New England Patriots, Rob Gronkowski, who is realizing a meteoric rise to a spot in NFL history. Another who played major league baseball. And the youngest, an up-and-coming Division 1 football player. Growing Up Gronk takes readers behind the scenes to tell the Gronkowski's incredible story, revealing how they were raised, how they were motivated, how they trained, how they played, even how their mother kept them fed. It all started with their father, Gordy, under whose tutelage this collection of giants has broken every rule about how 21st century athletic success functions. Beyond their monstrous size, physicality, and raw talent, Papa Gronk recognized early on that a clear commitment to fitness, health, and determination would give his boys a leg up in a way other families simply couldn’t match. This unique story of the NFL's new first family reveals the secrets to the Gronkowski's collective success and opens the door a one-of-a-kind household, a veritable incubator of athletic greatness.


message 18: by Jill, Assisting Moderator - Global NF, HF, European/Brit. Hist/Music (last edited Aug 04, 2013 12:58PM) (new)

Jill Hutchinson (Bucs1960) | 6661 comments The latest inductees into the NFL Hall of Fame. Congratulations, gentlemen.



Chris Carter, Jonathan Ogden, Dave Robinson, Larry Allen, Bill Parcells, Curly Culp, and Warren Sapp.


Alisa (MsTaz) | 5293 comments Great pic, Jill. Kind of a big class this year. Nice!


message 20: by Jill, Assisting Moderator - Global NF, HF, European/Brit. Hist/Music (new)

Jill Hutchinson (Bucs1960) | 6661 comments Good class....I was glad to see Warren Sapp make the grade.

College football is just about to start and the fans are ready for tailgating and general mayhem. Go out there and support your local college/university. The fans are part of the game and make a difference. Win or lose, they are still your team.
Go Marshall Thundering Herd and WVU Mountaineers!!!!!






message 21: by Jill, Assisting Moderator - Global NF, HF, European/Brit. Hist/Music (last edited Sep 18, 2013 07:17PM) (new)

Jill Hutchinson (Bucs1960) | 6661 comments Any football fan is familiar with the record breaking 63 yard field goal kicked by Tom Dempsey of the New Orleans Saints in the last few seconds of the game to win it. Amazing kick?....yes......but even more amazing due to Dempsey's handicap. The record still stands but has been tied twice.

Tom Dempsey's Record Breaking Kick

Thomas Dempsey is a former American football placekicker in the National Football League for the New Orleans Saints (1969–1970), Philadelphia Eagles (1971–1974), Los Angeles Rams (1975–1976), Houston Oilers (1977) and Buffalo Bills (1978–1979). He attended high school at San Dieguito High School and played college football at Palomar College. Unlike the "soccer style" approach used by nearly all place kickers today, Dempsey used a straight approach which was the style primarily used to kick the ball during his era.

Dempsey is most widely known for his NFL record 63-yard field goal, kicked in the final two seconds to give the New Orleans Saints a 19–17 win over the Detroit Lions on November 8, 1970 at Tulane Stadium in New Orleans. This record still stands as of 2012, although it has been equaled three times; on October 25, 1998, by Jason Elam of the Denver Broncos against the Jacksonville Jaguars, at Mile High Stadium in Denver, on September 12, 2011, by Sebastian Janikowski of the Oakland Raiders against the Denver Broncos, at Sports Authority Field at Mile High in Denver, and by David Akers of the San Francisco 49ers at Lambeau Field, on September 9, 2012. In a preseason game in 2002, Ola Kimrin kicked a 65-yard field goal, but as it was a preseason game, it is ineligible for the NFL record.

Prior to 1974 the goal posts in the NFL were on the goal lines instead of the end lines. With time running out in the game, the Saints attempted a place kick with holder Joe Scarpati spotting at the Saints' own 37-yard line. The snap from Jackie Burkett was good, and Dempsey nailed the field goal with a couple of feet to spare. The win was one of only two for the Saints in that otherwise-forgettable season. Dempsey's kick shattered the old mark of 56 yards set in 1953 by Colts' kicker Bert Rechichar and his record still has not been broken.

Dempsey was born without toes on his right foot and no fingers on his right hand. He wore a modified shoe with a flattened and enlarged toe surface. This generated controversy about whether such a shoe gave a player an unfair advantage. When reporters would ask him if he thought it was unfair, he said "Unfair eh? How 'bout you try kickin' a 63 yard field goal to win it with 2 seconds left an' yer wearin' a square shoe, oh, yeah and no toes either". Additionally, when an analysis of his kick was carried out by ESPN Sport Science, it was found that his modified shoe offered him no advantage - the smaller contact area could in fact have increased the margin of error.] In 1977, the NFL added a rule, informally known as the "Tom Dempsey Rule," that "any shoe that is worn by a player with an artificial limb on his kicking leg must have a kicking surface that conforms to that of a normal kicking shoe." (Source: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Tom_Dempsey)

___________________________________________________




message 22: by Jill, Assisting Moderator - Global NF, HF, European/Brit. Hist/Music (last edited Sep 26, 2013 06:28PM) (new)

Jill Hutchinson (Bucs1960) | 6661 comments One of the most exciting and hysterical endings to any college football game. This is the Cal/Stanford game of 1982 in the final seconds. It is one of the great plays in college football but there is a special twist that will make you laugh.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=mfebpL...


message 23: by Jill, Assisting Moderator - Global NF, HF, European/Brit. Hist/Music (new)

Jill Hutchinson (Bucs1960) | 6661 comments Do you think there should be a "mercy" rule in college football......something like "throwing in the towel"? There have been some terrible blowouts in the first few weeks of college ball......75-0, 72-3, 68-0. It has to be humiliating for the loser and it appears that some coaches just keep adding up the points instead of letting up and putting in the third string. This question was asked on a local sports program and the answers were equally for and against. Anybody have a comment?


message 24: by Bryan, Assisting Moderator - Presidential Series (last edited Oct 07, 2013 06:43AM) (new)

Bryan Craig | 10322 comments I noticed a lot lopsided scores during these non-conference games. They bring in a lot of money, and that is why they set up these crazy games.

I like to see second-stringers come in and get play experience, but I'm not sure that is done. More points = better visibility and bowl chances....

This is all messed up.


Mike Gabor (mikeyppl) | 617 comments How about a mercy rule for my Giants. 0 and 5, aarrrgh!

Well, maybe we got the first pick in the draft to look forward to.


message 26: by Bryan, Assisting Moderator - Presidential Series (new)

Bryan Craig | 10322 comments Indeed, Mike.


message 27: by Jill, Assisting Moderator - Global NF, HF, European/Brit. Hist/Music (new)

Jill Hutchinson (Bucs1960) | 6661 comments Bryan wrote: "I noticed a lot lopsided scores during these non-conference games. They bring in a lot of money, and that is why they set up these crazy games.

I like to see second-stringers come in and get play..."


You said the magic word.....money. But I don't think running up the score to some humiliating number is what its all about. A win is a win, but you don't have to rub the noses of the lesser team in it. But that seems to be the trend.

Poor Giants, Mike. It is not a good year.


message 28: by Bryan, Assisting Moderator - Presidential Series (last edited Oct 07, 2013 04:17PM) (new)

Bryan Craig | 10322 comments I agree Jill. Both sides get money for just playing and helps the local economy. For example my university played the Oregon Ducks and it was the first time in a long time they played on the East Coast, so a lot of fans came.

Still do not like the scoring.


message 29: by Jill, Assisting Moderator - Global NF, HF, European/Brit. Hist/Music (new)

Jill Hutchinson (Bucs1960) | 6661 comments This book is for the Pittsburgh Steelers fan who remembers some of the terrible years (like this year at 1-4), and some of the great ones....... the Immaculate Reception, the Steel Curtain, and the Super Bowl victories.

The Good, the Bad and the Ugly

The Good, the Bad, & the Ugly  Pittsburgh Steelers  Heart-Pounding, Jaw-Dropping, and Gut-Wrenching Moments from Pittsburgh Steelers History by Matt Fulks by Matt Fulks (no photo)

Synopsis:

Genuine fans take the best team moments with the less than great, and know that the games that are best forgotten make the good moments truly shine. This monumental book of the Pittsburgh Steelers documents all the best moments and personalities in the history of the team, but also unmasks the regrettably awful and the unflinchingly ugly. In entertaining—and unsparing—fashion, this book sparkles with Steelers highlights and lowlights, from wonderful and wacky memories to the famous and infamous. Such moments include the impressive run to the Super Bowl in 2006 and the great plays of Ben Roethlisberger, as well as the horrendous years in the 1980s, when the Steelers struggled below .500 three out of four seasons. Whether providing fond memories, goose bumps, or laughs, this portrait of the team is sure to appeal to the fan who has been through it all.


message 30: by Libby, HBC Admin - Middle Eastern/Religious Studies (new)

Libby | 755 comments


All American: Two Young Men, the 2001 Army/Navy Game and the War They Fought in Iraq


All American  Two Young Men, the 2001 Army/Navy Game and the War They Fought in Iraq by Steve Eubanks by Steve Eubanks (no photo)

Synopsis:

A moving and fascinating dual profile of honor, duty, courage, and competition, All American is a thoughtful exploration of American character and values, embodied in the lives of two remarkable young men.

In December 2001, as fires still burned beneath the ruins of the World Trade Center, West Point cadet Chad Jenkins and Naval Academy midshipman Brian Stann faced off at Veterans Stadium in Philadelphia in what would become the most-watched college football game of the decade: the matchup between the Army Black Knights and the Navy Midshipmen.

At opposing stadiums throughout the season, the Army and Navy teams, used to jeers from their opponents' fans, had instead been greeted with standing ovations from respectful crowds who knew that these young players, military officers in training, were soon going to fight a war in the Middle East. On this day, before this momentous game, President George W. Bush—along with others such as General Norman Schwarzkopf and Senator John McCain—visited both locker rooms before watching the game from the sidelines.

When Stann, a Navy linebacker, first came into contact with Jenkins, the Army quarterback, his team was behind by thirteen points. Yet he managed to land the perfect tackle against Jenkins. Though these two players would not meet again for a decade, Stann and Jenkins shared the same path: both went to war. As first-class officers serving several tours of duty, they led soldiers and marines and participated in events they never imagined possible.


message 31: by Jill, Assisting Moderator - Global NF, HF, European/Brit. Hist/Music (last edited Dec 09, 2013 06:09PM) (new)

Jill Hutchinson (Bucs1960) | 6661 comments The 43 year old field goal record of 63 yards by Tom Dempsey (see post 21) was finally broken this week-end by Matt Prater of the Denver Broncos. He kicked a 64 yard field goal. Amazing!!!!! See the video at the link below:

http://www.washingtonpost.com/blogs/e...


Martin Zook | 234 comments Yeah, but Dempsey did it with half a foot.


message 33: by Bryan, Assisting Moderator - Presidential Series (last edited Dec 10, 2013 06:53AM) (new)

Bryan Craig | 10322 comments And it could have gone another few yards, too.


message 34: by Jill, Assisting Moderator - Global NF, HF, European/Brit. Hist/Music (last edited Jan 04, 2014 12:43PM) (new)

Jill Hutchinson (Bucs1960) | 6661 comments I've heard it said that Dempsey had an advantage because of his special shoe (as shown in post 21), since that was in the day before soccer style kicking and he was kicking straight on with a flat surface. I dismiss that argument


message 35: by Jill, Assisting Moderator - Global NF, HF, European/Brit. Hist/Music (new)

Jill Hutchinson (Bucs1960) | 6661 comments Well, football fans.....here we go. The first of the playoffs for the Superbowl. Today's match-ups are:

Chiefs vs Colts
Saints vs Eagles
Chargers vs Bengals
49ers vs Packers.

Pick your favorites and see how you do. Remember that the 49ers are playing at Lambeau and the temperature may be in the negative. That has got to make a difference. Good luck to all and may the best team win (although that is not always the case!!)


message 36: by Jill, Assisting Moderator - Global NF, HF, European/Brit. Hist/Music (new)

Jill Hutchinson (Bucs1960) | 6661 comments I think all our football fans are hiding out!!! Today starts the last step toward the Super Bowl with Manning facing Brady in the Patriots/Broncos game that is generating the most interest. Two young quarterbacks are leading the 49ers and the Seahawks. Ought to be quite a great day for football.


David (nusandman) | 71 comments A worthy read for any fan of the NFL. Nate Jackson describes his unspectacular career and the injuries that he had to persevere. This book is very well written, I enjoyed his wit and style.

Slow Getting Up  A Story of NFL Survival from the Bottom of the Pile by Nate Jackson by Nate Jackson

An unvarnished and uncensored account of quotidian life in the NFL from one of the best writers to ever play in its ranks

The NFL is the most popular sports league in America-and the most damaging to its players. Degenerative brain conditions, early onset arthritis, bad knees, hips, shoulders: such is the glory that awaits the retired veteran of the NFL-as well as the terrible pensions and imminent financial ruin for the majority that lack college degrees. But for the millions of NFL fans, the average NFL player is faceless; his pain and suffering virtually invisible.

Nate Jackson was a receiver at tiny Division III Menlo College, on the coast of California. Talented enough to sign as a free agent with the 49ers, he then played for six seasons with the Denver Broncos, bouncing from the practice squad to the active roster and eventually a starting spot-a player barely holding on to a career in the pros, like the majority of his fellow players.

As he traces the arc of his career, Jackson brings to light the story of hundreds of everyday, "expendable" players whose lives-unlike those of their superstar colleagues-aren't captured in high-definition. From scouting combines to training camps, off-season parties to game-day routines, this remarkably written memoir-funny, candid, controversial, and artful-is an unforgettable look at life in the NFL, and the real lives of young men risking their bodies, and ultimately their lives, to play pro football.


message 38: by Bentley, Group Founder, Leader, Chief (last edited Apr 05, 2014 05:54PM) (new)

Bentley | 23983 comments David a great add - if you could just add (no photo) at the end of your citation - it would be perfect.

Here is an example which is the way citations are done for books where there is no author's photo: (that way folks know that you looked for the author's photo and for some reason it was not on goodreads).

Slow Getting Up  A Story of NFL Survival from the Bottom of the Pile by Nate Jackson by Nate Jackson (no photo)

I think that I will add this to my to read pile. Thanks a lot - keep letting us know of other worthy books.


message 39: by Jerome, Assisting Moderator (T) - Military History (new)

Jerome | 1777 comments An upcoming book:
Release date: August 1, 2014

The Opening Kickoff: The Tumultuous Birth of a Football Nation

The Opening Kickoff  The Tumultuous Birth of a Football Nation by Dave Revsine by Dave RevsineDave Revsine

Synopsis:

It’s America’s most popular sport, played by thousands, watched by millions, and generating billions in revenues every year. It’s also America’s most controversial sport, haunted by the specter of life-threatening injuries and plagued by scandal, even among its most venerable personalities and institutions. At the college level, we often tie football’s tales of corruption and greed to its current popularity and revenue potential, and we have vague notions of a halcyon time--before the BCS, power conferences, and huge TV contracts. Perhaps we conjure images of young Ivy Leaguers playing a gentleman’s game, exemplifying the collegial in collegiate. What we don’t imagine is a game described in 1905, not today, as "a social obsession--this boy-killing, man-mutillating, education-prostituting, gladiatorial sport."

In The Opening Kickoff, Dave Revsine tells the riveting story of the formative period of American football (1890-1915). It was a time that saw the game’s meteoric rise, fueled by overflow crowds, breathless newspaper coverage and newfound superstars—including one of the most thrilling and mysterious the sport has ever seen. But it was also a period racked by controversy in academics, recruiting, and physical brutality that, in combination, threatened football’s very existence. A vivid storyteller, Revsine brings it all to life in a captivating narrative.


message 40: by Jill, Assisting Moderator - Global NF, HF, European/Brit. Hist/Music (new)

Jill Hutchinson (Bucs1960) | 6661 comments One of the greatest coaches in NFL history has passed away. Chuck Noll who led the Pittsburgh Steelers in the glory days and brought home many Super Bowl wins to the Steel City will be missed. Thanks for all the memories, Coach.


message 41: by Bryan, Assisting Moderator - Presidential Series (new)

Bryan Craig | 10322 comments No way, Jill, really!? I didn't know, sad, a legend...


message 42: by Jill, Assisting Moderator - Global NF, HF, European/Brit. Hist/Music (new)

Jill Hutchinson (Bucs1960) | 6661 comments Pittsburgh is a very sad place today. He was so well loved.


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