The History Book Club discussion

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message 51: by Jill, Assisting Moderator - Military Hist L/Global NF/Eur/Brit/Music (last edited Sep 26, 2011 03:36PM) (new)

Jill Hutchinson (Bucs1960) | 11491 comments Mod
Summer of '49  by David Halberstam by David HalberstamDavid Halberstam

The Pulitzer Prize winning historian David Halberstam covers the Yankees (with Joltin' Joe)and the Red Sox (with the Splendid Splinter Ted Williams) race for the American League pennant in 1949. He covers the action game by game on and off the field....and if you like old time baseball at its best, this is the book for you.


message 52: by Craig (new)

Craig (Twinstuff) Bryan wrote: "This looks interesting:

Baseball in the Garden of Eden The Secret History of the Early Game by John ThornJohn Thorn

Some reviews:
“With elegance, wit and precision, John Th..."


This is another one that's on my bookcase in my bedroom waiting to be read. I love learning more about early American baseball, especially the connections between Civil War General Abner Doubleday and the game (even though he DID NOT invent baseball!)

I used to work in professional baseball and have met and counted as friends many of the authors and even some of the profiled players in this thread so perhaps I can offer some insight into some of these works. The last baseball book I read was Jane Leavy's bio of Mickey Mantle, which I highly recommend. He was such a complicated individual and was part of the baseball era where our heroes held much stronger grips on fans than they do today, I believe.

Jane Leavy (Author)
The Last Boy Mickey Mantle and the End of America's Childhood  by Jane Leavy


message 53: by Bryan, Honorary Contributor - EMERITUS (new)

Bryan Craig | 11631 comments Mod
Awesome, Craig, we appreciate you sharing your expertise.


message 54: by Alisa (new)

Alisa (MsTaz) | 5516 comments Anyone read this? Looks like an interesting story that would appeal to folks interested in baseball and espionage.
The Catcher Was a Spy The Mysterious Life of Moe Berg by Nicholas Dawidoff by Nicholas Dawidoff
The only Major League ballplayer whose baseball card is on display at the headquarters of the CIA, Moe Berg has the singular distinction of having both a 15-year career as a catcher for such teams as the New York Robins and the Chicago White Sox and that of a spy for the OSS during World War II. Here, Dawidoff provides "a careful and sympathetic biography" (Chicago Sun-Tim...moreThe only Major League ballplayer whose baseball card is on display at the headquarters of the CIA, Moe Berg has the singular distinction of having both a 15-year career as a catcher for such teams as the New York Robins and the Chicago White Sox and that of a spy for the OSS during World War II. Here, Dawidoff provides "a careful and sympathetic biography" (Chicago Sun-Times) of this enigmatic man. Photos.


message 55: by Brian (new)

Brian The Game from Where I Stand A Ballplayer's Inside View by Doug Glanville
I have recently started this book. It is written by a retired MLB player. The book is about the inside workings of baseball. My boyhood dream was to play in the Major's...having not made it, this book gives me a peek into the world of baseball. A sight that very few people ever experience. I recommend it. So far an A-


message 56: by Alisa (new)

Alisa (MsTaz) | 5516 comments Brian, don't forget to add the author links when you cite a book. Like this:
The Game from Where I Stand A Ballplayer's Inside View by Doug Glanvilleby Doug Glanville

Looks like a fun book, thanks for sharing it here.


message 57: by Bentley, Group Founder, Leader, Chief (last edited Feb 15, 2012 09:11AM) (new)

Bentley | 31631 comments Mod
Brian, thank you for the add, that looks like a fabulous book. If you look at the post above you (message 54 by Alisa) or Jill's in message 51 you will see how we add citations depending upon whether the author's photo is available or not on goodreads.

I just want to point out that we have rules for citations here at the History Book Club. First you must add the book cover which you did do, then you must add the author's photo if it is available, and then the author's link which is the author's name in linkable text. We usually type in the word by before the author elements.

In the case of your book only the book cover and the author's link are available; so could you edit your post 55 and add the missing elements. It is always easier to add the citation at the bottom of the post itself. We do this because the goodreads software then populates automatically where the book and/or author is being discussed across our group site and across goodreads. It makes it easier for all of our group members to link to the book, to see what else the author has written and to also see on any thread what books and what authors have been mentioned or discussed. If you do not put in these links properly, then this does not happen.

We are very consistent about pointing these things out to all members and we make sure that the citation rules are absolutely followed. So please do not take this personally in any way. This is just part of our group's rules and guidelines.

If you edit message 55, I will delete this post. And thanks for understanding and your add. Also when just mentioning authors, we add the author's photo if available and the author's link.

The Game from Where I Stand A Ballplayer's Inside View by Doug Glanville by Doug Glanville (no photo)


message 58: by Alisa (new)

Alisa (MsTaz) | 5516 comments A book about one of the sport's more colorful players ~
Lefty An American Odyssey by Vernona Gomez by Vernona Gomez
Born to a small-town California ranching family, the youngest of eight, Vernon “Lefty” Gomez rode his powerful arm and jocular personality right across America to the dugout of the New York Yankees. Lefty baffled hitters with his blazing fastball, establishing himself as the team’s ace. He vacationed with Babe Ruth, served as Joe DiMaggio’s confidant, and consoled Lou Gehrig the day the “Iron Horse” removed himself from the lineup. He started and won the first-ever All-Star Game, was the first pitcher to make the cover of Time magazine, and barnstormed Japan as part of Major League Baseball’s grand ambassadorial tour in 1934. Away from the diamond, Lefty played the big-city bon vivant, marrying Broadway star June O’Dea and hobnobbing with a who’s who of celebrities, including George Gershwin, Jack Dempsey, Ernest Hemingway, Marilyn Monroe, George M. Cohan, and James Michener. He even scored a private audience with the pope.

And even when his pro ball career was done, Lefty wasn’t. He became a national representative for Wilson Sporting Goods, logging over 100,000 miles a year, spreading the word about America’s favorite game, and touching thousands of lives. In 1972 he was inducted into the National Baseball Hall of Fame. Three baseball fields are named for him, and to this day the top honor bestowed each year by the American Baseball Coaches Association is the Lefty Gomez Award.

Now, drawing on countless conversations with Lefty, interweaving more than three hundred interviews conducted with his family, friends, competitors, and teammates over the course of a decade, and revealing candid photos, documents, and film clips—many never shown publicly—his daughter Vernona Gomez and her award-winning co-author Lawrence Goldstone vividly re-create the life and adventures of the irreverent southpaw fondly dubbed “El Señor Goofy.”

“I’d rather be lucky than good,” Lefty Gomez once quipped—one of many classic one-liners documented here. In the end he was both. A star-studded romp through baseball’s most glorious seasons and America’s most glamorous years, Lefty is at once a long-overdue reminder of a pitcher’s greatness and a heartwarming celebration of a life well-lived.


message 59: by Jill, Assisting Moderator - Military Hist L/Global NF/Eur/Brit/Music (new)

Jill Hutchinson (Bucs1960) | 11491 comments Mod
Here is a look at the early days of America's favorite game.

Old Time Baseball: America's Pastime In The Gilded Age


Old Time Baseball America's Pastime In The Gilded Age by Harvey Frommer by Harvey Frommer

Synopsis

In this history of the sport, Harvey Frommer captures the flavor, smell, and craziness of the early days of baseball, creating vivid portraits of the colorful personalities who shaped the game. Starting with its invention in 1842 by the descendant of a British sea captain (and not Abner Doubleday), Frommer traces the development of the sport from the first games on a vacant lot at 27th and Madison in New York to the turn of the century, when the National League was emerging as the preeminent forum for truly professional baseball.


message 60: by Doug (last edited Jun 07, 2012 08:02AM) (new)

Doug DePew (DougDePew) | 34 comments Hi, everybody! I recently read "Judge and Jury: The Life and Times of Judge Kenesaw Mountain Landis" by David Pietrusza. I'm unable to get it to link to the post right now, but it's on Goodreads. I reviewed it, actually. Here's a link.
http://www.goodreads.com/book/show/18...

I enjoyed it a lot! It was fascinating not just from the baseball perspective but from the historical perspective as well. He was instrumental in a lot of important federal decisions prior to entering baseball. I'm glad I picked it up.

I hope everybody's doing great out there. Sorry I've been a little MIA. Just busy with life. I'm reading another baseball book now that I'll share once I'm finished.


message 61: by Bryan, Honorary Contributor - EMERITUS (new)

Bryan Craig | 11631 comments Mod
Thanks, Doug, funny, here it is:

Judge and Jury The Life and Times of Judge Kenesaw Mountain Landis by David PietruszaDavid Pietrusza


message 62: by Mike (new)

Mike Gabor (mikeyppl) | 667 comments Eight Men Out The Black Sox and the 1919 World Series by Eliot AsinofEliot Asinof

This is a great book which tells the story of the 1919 Black Sox.


message 63: by Mike (last edited Jun 07, 2012 09:29AM) (new)

Mike Gabor (mikeyppl) | 667 comments Alisa wrote: "Anyone read this? Looks like an interesting story that would appeal to folks interested in baseball and espionage.
[bookcover:The Catcher Was a Spy: The Mysterious Life of Moe Berg] by Nicholas Da..."


This is really a good book. Moe Berg was quite a colorful character. A extremely intelligent man with very eccentric characteristics. I especially like the way he felt about newspapers. Wheter you're a baseball fan or not I think you would find this book very entertaining.
The Catcher Was a Spy The Mysterious Life of Moe Berg by Nicholas DawidoffNicholas Dawidoff


message 64: by Mike (last edited Jun 07, 2012 09:47AM) (new)

Mike Gabor (mikeyppl) | 667 comments The Last Boy Mickey Mantle and the End of America's Childhood  by Jane LeavyJane Leavy
Willie Mays The Life, the Legend by James S. HirschJames S. Hirsch
Joe DiMaggio The Hero's Life by Richard Ben Cramer
Richard Ben Cramer


Three excellent books about three of the greatest players of all times. However, I found thier stories to be quite sad. Even with all the fame and fortune these were not happy men.


message 65: by Doug (new)

Doug DePew (DougDePew) | 34 comments Bryan wrote: "Thanks, Doug, funny, here it is:

[bookcover:Judge and Jury: The Life and Times of Judge Kenesaw Mountain Landis]David Pietrusza"


Thanks, Bryan! I tried to link it by link, cover, and author and couldn't get it to come up. Might have just been a glitch.


message 66: by Vincent (new)

Vincent (vpbrancato) | 1016 comments Here is one worth reading

Men at Work The Craft of Baseball by George F. Will George F. WillGeorge F. Will

I actually listened to it on audio book

Really good


message 67: by Jill, Assisting Moderator - Military Hist L/Global NF/Eur/Brit/Music (new)

Jill Hutchinson (Bucs1960) | 11491 comments Mod
Even though this book covers other events happening in NYC during 1977, it provides an incisive look at the battle among Billy Martin, Reggie Jackson, and George Steinbrunner as the Yankees made their run to the World Series.....and what a battle it was!

Ladies and Gentlemen, The Bronx is Burning

Ladies and Gentlemen, the Bronx is Burning 1977, Baseball, Politics, and the Battle for the Soul of a City by Jonathan Mahler by Jonathan Mahler

Synopsis

A kaleidoscopic portrait of New York City in 1977, The Bronx Is Burning is the story of two epic battles: the fight between Yankee Reggie Jackson and team manager Billy Martin, and the battle between Mario Cuomo and Ed Koch for the city's mayorship. Buried beneath these parallel conflicts--one for the soul of baseball, the other for the soul of the city--was the subtext of race.

Deftly intertwined by journalist Jonathan Mahler, these braided Big Apple narratives reverberate to reveal a year that also saw the opening of Studio 54, the acquisition of the New York Post by Rupert Murdoch, a murderer dubbed the "Son of Sam," the infamous blackout, and the evolution of punk rock. As Koch defeated Cuomo, and as Reggie Jackson rescued a team racked with dissension, 1977 became a year of survival--and also of hope.


message 68: by Mike (last edited Jun 11, 2012 08:36AM) (new)

Mike Gabor (mikeyppl) | 667 comments Being a life long New Yorker I can say that this book really captures the times very well. One thing however, Howard Cosell was always credited with saying "Ladies and gentlemen, the Bronx is burning." Well, he never did say it. Check out his biography by Mark Ribowsky, Howard Cosell: The Man, The Myth, and the Transformation of American Sports.

Howard Cosell The Man, the Myth, and the Transformation of American Sports by Mark RibowskyMark Ribowsky


message 69: by Jill, Assisting Moderator - Military Hist L/Global NF/Eur/Brit/Music (new)

Jill Hutchinson (Bucs1960) | 11491 comments Mod
Jackie Robinson may have broken Major League baseball's color barrier in 1947 but decades earlier, Negro Leaguers and white Major Leaguers shared the same fields in post-season barnstorming exhibitions around the country


Satch, Dizzy and Rapid Robert

Satch, Dizzy, and Rapid Robert The Wild Saga of Interracial Baseball Before Jackie Robinson by Timothy M. Gay by Timothy Gay

Synopsis

Historian Timothy Gay chronicles an oft-forgotten era when such big names as Satchel Paige, Dizzy Dean, and Bob Feller joined fellow future Hall of Famers Josh Gibson, Joe DiMaggio, and Stan Musial in wild games that often drew an entire community to the ballpark (violating countless Jim Crow laws in the process)...transcending the prejudices of their time and paving the way for Robinson's historical debut.


message 70: by Jill, Assisting Moderator - Military Hist L/Global NF/Eur/Brit/Music (new)

Jill Hutchinson (Bucs1960) | 11491 comments Mod
My beloved Pirates are in first place in their division...........it can't last!!!!


message 71: by Jon (new)

Jon Sindell | 9 comments Jill wrote: "My beloved Pirates are in first place in their division...........it can't last!!!!"

It can't last, Jill ... until it does!

J:o)n


message 72: by Jill, Assisting Moderator - Military Hist L/Global NF/Eur/Brit/Music (new)

Jill Hutchinson (Bucs1960) | 11491 comments Mod
Jon wrote: "Jill wrote: "My beloved Pirates are in first place in their division...........it can't last!!!!"

It can't last, Jill ... until it does!

J:o)n"


It has been so long!!!!! But I have always be a fan, even when they were in the basement.


message 73: by Jon (new)

Jon Sindell | 9 comments Jill wrote: "Jon wrote: "Jill wrote: "My beloved Pirates are in first place in their division...........it can't last!!!!"

It can't last, Jill ... until it does!

J:o)n"

It has been so long!!!!! But I have ..."


You deserve it. Here in San Francisco, strong men cried in 2010 when the Giants won their first W.S. since moving to Frisco in 1958. Btw, as renowned as AT&T Park is for its beauty, I can't say that your ballpark takes a back seat to any. It's just gorgeous.

Well, I'd better get back on the thread. So, Lady Pitt, any book to recommend involving Pirates history? About the great Clemente perhaps, or the incredible 1960 World Series?


message 74: by Craig (new)

Craig (Twinstuff) Don't the Pirates still have an active streak of 19 straight losing seasons? I just hope they don't have another late-season collapse like last year. Congrats on the turnaround. Maybe this will be their year. I think I was at the Pirates last home playoff game back in 1992.


message 75: by Jill, Assisting Moderator - Military Hist L/Global NF/Eur/Brit/Music (last edited Jul 17, 2012 07:58PM) (new)

Jill Hutchinson (Bucs1960) | 11491 comments Mod
The 1960 series may have had the greatest 7th game in baseball history........and this book tells that story as well as filling in the blanks about the hero of Pittsburgh, Bill Mazerowski. I have a CD of the broadcast that I sometimes listen to in the car when on a long trip. Amazing!!!


Maz and the '60 Bucs by Jim O'Brien by Jim O'Brien


message 76: by Jon (new)

Jon Sindell | 9 comments Alisa wrote: "Anyone read this? Looks like an interesting story that would appeal to folks interested in baseball and espionage.
[bookcover:The Catcher Was a Spy: The Mysterious Life of Moe Berg] by Nicholas Da..."


Hi Alisa,

I haven't read that one, but I read and enjoyed Moe Berg: Athlete, Scholar, Spy.

The Berg story has been debunked a little, but what remains is still extraordinary. It's always amused me that the Japanese didn't pick up on the fact that this mediocre (at best) backup catcher was out of place on a team of great American stars.

My favorite piece of Bergiana is this: A reporter told one of his teammates that Berg could speak eleven languages. "Yeah," the guy replied, "and he can't hit in any of `em." :o)


message 77: by Jon (new)

Jon Sindell | 9 comments Mike wrote: "[bookcover:Eight Men Out: The Black Sox and the 1919 World Series]Eliot Asinof

This is a great book which tells the story of the 1919 Black Sox."


Hello Mike,

Good tip. The film version is my personal choice for greatest baseball movie ever.


message 78: by Jon (new)

Jon Sindell | 9 comments Mike wrote: "[bookcover:The Last Boy: Mickey Mantle and the End of America's Childhood]Jane Leavy
[bookcover:Willie Mays: The Life the Legend]James S. Hirsch
[bookcover:Joe DiMaggio: The Hero's Life]
Richard B..."


Interesting observation, Mike.

As for Mantle, I understand he expected to die young because his father and grandfather had died young of Hodgkins disease, and so he lived hard to make the most of life -- too hard, of course. What he didn't realize was that his dad and granddad had inhaled zinc and lead dust in the mines, adding to their susceptibility to the disease. A tragic misapprehension on Mickey's part.


message 79: by Mike (new)

Mike Gabor (mikeyppl) | 667 comments Jon wrote: "Jill wrote: "Jon wrote: "Jill wrote: "My beloved Pirates are in first place in their division...........it can't last!!!!"

It can't last, Jill ... until it does!

J:o)n"

It has been so long!!!!!..."


There's a wonderful book out called Kiss It Good-Bye, which details the 1960 season.

Kiss It Good-Bye The Mystery, the Mormon, and the Moral of the 1960 Pittsburgh Pirates by John MoodyJohn Moody John Moody


message 80: by Alisa (new)

Alisa (MsTaz) | 5516 comments Jon wrote: "Alisa wrote: "Anyone read this? Looks like an interesting story that would appeal to folks interested in baseball and espionage.
[bookcover:The Catcher Was a Spy: The Mysterious Life of Moe Berg] ..."


The quote is hilarious! Made my day.
Looks like an interesting book. Remember to use the add book/author feature in accordance with our guidelines when posting about a book. We all want to see what you are referring to.

Thanks again.
Moe Berg Athlete, Scholar, Spy by Louis Kaufman by Louis Kaufman


message 81: by Jon (new)

Jon Sindell | 9 comments Alisa wrote: "Jon wrote: "Alisa wrote: "Anyone read this? Looks like an interesting story that would appeal to folks interested in baseball and espionage.
[bookcover:The Catcher Was a Spy: The Mysterious Life o..."


That Berg quotation made the book for me!

So, you'll probably like this one: When the Mets were formed in 1962, they, and the Houston Colt 45's, were allowed to draft players from existing teams; but since the teams were allowed to exempt their talented players from the draft, the pickings were slim indeed.

The Mets chose a thoroughly mediocre catcher, Hobie Landrith, with their first pick. So reporters asked Casey Stengel why he'd picked Landrith.

He replied: "If you don't have a catcher, the ball goes to the backstop."

Not exactly a ringing endorsement!


message 82: by Alisa (new)

Alisa (MsTaz) | 5516 comments Jon, another good one! Maybe it is my imagination but I love the characters of old baseball.


message 83: by Mike (last edited Jul 19, 2012 09:50AM) (new)

Mike Gabor (mikeyppl) | 667 comments Speaking of the old New York Mets, they had a journeyman catcher by the name of Choo Choo Coleman. Choo Choo wasn't much of a talker. After one game he was a guest on the post game show, Kiner's Corner. After a bunch of one word answers from Choo Choo regarding that day's game, the host, Ralph Kiner decided to ask about his personal life. When asked his wife's name Choo Choo responded. "Mrs. Coleman."

Jimmy Breslin's book, Can't Anybody Here Play This Game, is probably the best book written on the 1962 Mets. Can't Anybody Here Play This Game? The Improbable Saga of the New York Mets' First Year by Jimmy Breslin Jimmy BreslinJimmy Breslin


message 84: by Jon (new)

Jon Sindell | 9 comments Good story, Mike. And that's a good book. Of course, Breslin had such great material to work with!

The Coleman story reminds me of the great philosopher Joaquin Andujar of the Cardinals. "There's one word about baseball," he said. "You never know."

But my favorite early Mets story is this one:

The Mets had a shortstop, Chacon, who spoke no English at all, and a white outfielder, the once-great Richie Ashburn. A couple of times, pop-ups went towards the Bermuda Triangle between short, left, and center. Ashburn came charging in, looking up at the ball, calling "I got it! I got it!" Chacon, knowing no English, banged into him and the ball was dropped.

So the manager, Stengel, taught Ashburn the Spanish phrase "Yo lo tengo!" "I got it!" in Spanish.

The next time a pop-up went out there, Ashburn charged in yelling "Yo lo ten go! Yo lo ten go!" And it worked! Chacon peeled off to let Ashburn take it.

But left fielder Frank Thomas, knowing no Spanish, banged into Ashburn! And the ball dropped!

After the play, Thomas said to Ashburn, "Hey Richie, what the hell's yellow tango mean?"

Yep. The early Mets.


message 85: by Jon (new)

Jon Sindell | 9 comments Alisa wrote: "Jon, another good one! Maybe it is my imagination but I love the characters of old baseball."

You're right to like those characters, Alisa.

You know, there's a fabulous book with a neat premise: every chapter is written by a different writer about his or her favorite "cult" baseball player. The quality is uneven, but the winners are priceless. The story of Joe Charboneau is a weird riot, and the piece by Ron Shelton, screenwriter of Bull Durham, about Steve Dalkowski, a pitcher with a once in a lifetime fastball but a problem with the bottle, is haunting.

Here's the book:
Cult Baseball Players The Greats, the Flakes, the Weird, and the Wonderful by Danny PearyDanny Peary


message 86: by Bentley, Group Founder, Leader, Chief (last edited Jul 20, 2012 10:13AM) (new)

Bentley | 31631 comments Mod
Hello Jon and that was good attempt with the citation. This is a book which unfortunately probably does not show a book cover. In the case of a book such as this one where there is no book cover, the citation would look like this:

Cult Baseball Players: The Greats, the Flakes, the Weird, and the Wonderful by Danny Peary

As you can see from the above, when the book cover is missing from goodreads and there is no book cover available - in these cases only - we add the book title rather than the blank and hard to see rectangle with the g in it. There was no author's photo available with this book either.

Thank you very much for your add and your posts on this very interesting thread about baseball history.


message 87: by Bryan, Honorary Contributor - EMERITUS (new)

Bryan Craig | 11631 comments Mod
Clement: The Passion and Grace of Baseball's Last Hero

Clemente The Passion and Grace of Baseball's Last Hero by David MaranissDavid Maranis

Synopsis

On New Year's Eve 1972, following eighteen magnificent seasons in the major leagues, Roberto Clemente died a hero's death, killed in a plane crash as he attempted to deliver food and medical supplies to Nicaragua after a devastating earthquake. David Maraniss now brings the great baseball player brilliantly back to life in Clemente: The Passion and Grace of Baseball's Last Hero, a book destined to become a modern classic. Much like his acclaimed biography of Vince Lombardi, When Pride Still Mattered, Maraniss uses his narrative sweep and meticulous detail to capture the myth and a real man.
Anyone who saw Clemente, as he played with a beautiful fury, will never forget him. He was a work of art in a game too often defined by statistics. During his career with the Pittsburgh Pirates, he won four batting titles and led his team to championships in 1960 and 1971, getting a hit in all fourteen World Series games in which he played. His career ended with three-thousand hits, the magical three-thousandth coming in his final at-bat, and he and the immortal Lou Gehrig are the only players to have the five-year waiting period waived so they could be enshrined in the Hall of Fame immediately after their deaths.

There is delightful baseball here, including thrilling accounts of the two World Series victories of Clemente's underdog Pittsburgh Pirates, but this is far more than just another baseball book. Roberto Clemente was that rare athlete who rose above sports to become a symbol of larger themes. Born near the canebrakes of rural Carolina, Puerto Rico, on August 18, 1934, at a time when there were no blacks or Puerto Ricans playing organized ball in the United States, Clemente went on to become the greatest Latino player in the major leagues. He was, in a sense, the Jackie Robinson of the Spanish-speaking world, a ballplayer of determination, grace, and dignity who paved the way and set the highest standard for waves of Latino players who followed in later generations and who now dominate the game.

The Clemente that Maraniss evokes was an idiosyncratic character who, unlike so many modern athletes, insisted that his responsibilities extended beyond the playing field. In his final years, his motto was that if you have a chance to help others and fail to do so, you are wasting your time on this earth. Here, in the final chapters, after capturing Clemente's life and times, Maraniss retraces his final days, from the earthquake to the accident, using newly uncovered documents to reveal the corruption and negligence that led the unwitting hero on a mission of mercy toward his untimely death as an uninspected, overloaded plane plunged into the sea.


message 88: by Alisa (new)

Alisa (MsTaz) | 5516 comments Great find, Bryan. Looks like another one for the TBR list!


message 89: by Jill, Assisting Moderator - Military Hist L/Global NF/Eur/Brit/Music (new)

Jill Hutchinson (Bucs1960) | 11491 comments Mod
What a great book that will be, Bryan......somehow I missed it but will be searching it out. Clemente was a true hero in Pittsburgh and also in his non-baseball life. Thanks for the recommendation.


message 90: by Jill, Assisting Moderator - Military Hist L/Global NF/Eur/Brit/Music (new)

Jill Hutchinson (Bucs1960) | 11491 comments Mod
Who doesn't love the Cubbies and this history of Chicago's famous Wrigley Field and the area surrounding it will satisfy the baseball lover.

Wrigleyville

Wrigleyville A Magical History Tour of the Chicago Cubs by Peter Golenbock by Peter Golenbock

Synopsis

For celebrated sportwriter Peter Golenbock, Wrigleyville is a symbol of America's fidelity to its greatest sport. As he did with classics of sports literature, Bums (a history of the Brooklyn Dodgers) and Dynasty (a history of the New York Yankees), Golenbock turns to a team that has won and broken the hearts of generations of fans; the Chicago Cubs. Utilizing dozens of personal interviews with players, coaches, fans, sportswriters, and clubhouse personnel, as well as out-of-print memiors by nineteeth-century players, Peter Golenbock has created a perfect gift for every baseball fan: a book that entertains, warms the heart, and touches the soul. This updated edition includes material from the team's past five years, such as Harry Caray's death, the magical seasons of Sammy Sosa and Kerry Wood, and the Cubs' 1998 playoff dive.


message 91: by Jill, Assisting Moderator - Military Hist L/Global NF/Eur/Brit/Music (new)

Jill Hutchinson (Bucs1960) | 11491 comments Mod
One of baseball's greatest players and Hall of Famer, Stan "the Man" Musial passed away today. The link below traces his career and life. He was indeed "The Man".

http://espn.go.com/mlb/story/_/id/886...


message 92: by Alisa (new)

Alisa (MsTaz) | 5516 comments This looks entertaining.

Who's on Worst?: The Lousiest Players, Biggest Cheaters, Saddest Goats and Other Antiheroes in Baseball History

Who's on Worst? The Lousiest Players, Biggest Cheaters, Saddest Goats and Other Antiheroes in Baseball History by Filip Bondy by Filip Bondy

Synopsis
Libraries and Internet sites are filled to groaning with debates about who the best ballplayers of all time were—but how many times can you argue about Mantle vs. Mays? Since baseball is a game of failure, it's much more fun to dive into the fray and explore baseball's worst: who was the lousiest pitcher of all-time? the biggest goat? the most despicable owner? the greatest cheater?

Filip Bondy wields formidable research, advanced sabermetrics and his considerable wit to provide this indispensable guide to the less glorious side of our national pastime. Each chapter is filled with rich and colorful stories of the players unfortunate enough to be chosen in each category and is followed by a handy top-ten list, such as Most Overpaid Yankees.

From a delightful survey of batters who fell below the dreaded "Mendoza Line" to a rundown of managers who had long careers distinguished by relentless losing to a roster of players who took steroids but still stunk, Who's on Worst? is a thoroughly entertaining portrait of the personalities who deserve their place in baseball history as much as the immortals.


message 93: by Bryan, Honorary Contributor - EMERITUS (last edited Jan 28, 2013 07:54AM) (new)

Bryan Craig | 11631 comments Mod
And:

Crazy '08: How a Cast of Cranks, Rogues, Boneheads, and Magnates Created the Greatest Year in Baseball History

Crazy '08 How a Cast of Cranks, Rogues, Boneheads, and Magnates Created the Greatest Year in Baseball History by Cait MurphyCait Murphy

Synopsis

they have to have. In October 1908, though, no one would have laughed: The Cubs were, without doubt, baseball's greatest team—the first dynasty of the 20th century.

Crazy '08 recounts the 1908 season—the year when Peerless Leader Frank Chance's men went toe to toe to toe with John McGraw and Christy Mathewson's New York Giants and Honus Wagner's Pittsburgh Pirates in the greatest pennant race the National League has ever seen. The American League has its own three-cornered pennant fight, and players like Cy Young, Ty Cobb, Walter Johnson, and the egregiously crooked Hal Chase ensured that the junior circuit had its moments. But it was the National League's—and the Cubs'—year.

Crazy '08, however, is not just the exciting story of a great season. It is also about the forces that created modern baseball, and the America that produced it. In 1908, crooked pols run Chicago's First Ward, and gambling magnates control the Yankees. Fans regularly invade the field to do handstands or argue with the umps; others shoot guns from rickety grandstands prone to burning. There are anarchists on the loose and racial killings in the town that made Lincoln. On the flimsiest of pretexts, General Abner Doubleday becomes a symbol of Americanism, and baseball's own anthem, "Take Me Out to the Ballgame," is a hit.

Picaresque and dramatic, 1908 is a season in which so many weird and wonderful things happen that it is somehow unsurprising that a hairpiece, a swarm of gnats, a sudden bout of lumbago, and a disaster down in the mines all play a role in its outcome. And sometimes the events are not so wonderful at all. There are several deaths by baseball, and the shadow of corruption creeps closer to the heart of baseball—the honesty of the game itself. Simply put, 1908 is the year that baseball grew up.

Oh, and it was the last time the Cubs won the World Series.

Destined to be as memorable as the season it documents, Crazy '08 sets a new standard for what a book about baseball can be.


message 94: by Jill, Assisting Moderator - Military Hist L/Global NF/Eur/Brit/Music (new)

Jill Hutchinson (Bucs1960) | 11491 comments Mod
What baseball fan doesn't have his favorite announcer, whether on radio or television...Harry Caray's "holy cow", or Bob Prince's "We had 'em all the way". Some of the greatest moments in baseball were made even greater by the guys behind the microphone. This book is a must for the baseball addict.

Voices of Summer: Ranking Baseball's 101 All-Time Best Announcers

Voices of Summer Ranking Baseball's 101 All-Time Best Announcers by Curt Smith by Curt Smith

Synopsis
Russ Hodges's frantic pronouncement at Bobby Thomson's "Shot Heard 'Round the World": "The Giants win the pennant! The Giants win the pennant!" and Jack Buck's incredulous remark after Kirk Gibson's heroic home run in the 1988 World Series: "I don't believe what I just saw!" are just a couple examples. The sometimes downright hysterical commentaries of broadcasters very often become more memorable than even the games they describe. Though countless studies have weighed the merits of our great players, none has assessed the virtues of the men who turn diving catches and soaring home runs into the stuff of myth. In The Voices of Summer, Curt Smith has compiled a list of 101 classic announcers—from national celebrities to local favorites, overlooked giants to upcoming stars—in search of the greatest baseball broadcaster of all time. From the poetic reflections of Dick Enberg to the Falstaffian frenzy of Harry Caray, Smith answers the timeless questions: Was Mel Allen better than Ernie Harwell? Does Joe Buck compare to his legendary dad? Which of today's young broadcasters really matches the all-time greats? Irreverent, authoritative, and uncommonly addictive, this book will be the definitive guide to baseball announcing for any and all baseball fans.


message 95: by Frank (new)

Frank | 70 comments The Echoing Green The Untold Story of Bobby Thomson, Ralph Branca and the Shot Heard Round the World by Joshua PragerJoshua Prager is good one. A mystery solved? Or more fuel. Also Munson The Life and Death of a Yankee Captain by Marty Appel Marty AppelMarty Appel Munson was playing at a time when baseball was changing. One foot in the past. For a birds eye view this is a great book. Thurman was above it all , but reading it is a great way to visit the Bronx Zoo.


message 96: by Alisa (new)

Alisa (MsTaz) | 5516 comments Opening Day: The Story of Jackie Robinson's First Season

Opening Day The Story of Jackie Robinson's First Season by Jonathan Eig by Jonathan EigJonathan Eig

April 15, 1947, marked the most important opening day in baseball history. When Jackie Robinson stepped onto the diamond that afternoon at Ebbets Field, he became the first black man to break into major-league baseball in the twentieth century. In Opening Day, Jonathan Eig tells the true story behind the national pastime's most sacred myth. Drawing on interviews with surviving players, sportswriters, and eyewitnesses, as well as newly discovered material from archives around the country, Eig presents a fresh portrait of a ferocious competitor who embodied integration's promise and helped launch the modern civil rights era.


message 97: by Alisa (new)

Alisa (MsTaz) | 5516 comments Southern League: A True Story of Baseball, Civil Rights, and the Deep South's Most Compelling Pennant Race
Southern League A True Story of Baseball, Civil Rights, and the Deep South's Most Compelling Pennant Race by Larry Colton by Larry Colton

Synopsis
"Birmingham is probably the most thoroughly segregated city in the United States. Its ugly record of brutality is widely known. Negroes have experienced grossly unjust treatment in the courts. There have been more unsolved bombings in Negro homes and churches in Birmingham than in any other city in the nation."

Martin Luther King, Jr.
Letter from a Birmingham Jail
1963

Anybody who is familiar with the Civil Rights movement knows that 1964 was a pivotal year. And in Birmingham, Alabama - perhaps the epicenter of racial conflict - the Barons amazingly started their season with an integrated team.

Johnny "Blue Moon" Odom, a talented pitcher and Tommie Reynolds, an outfielder - both young black ballplayers with dreams of playing someday in the big leagues, along with Bert Campaneris, a dark-skinned shortstop from Cuba, all found themselves in this simmering cauldron of a minor league town, all playing for Heywood Sullivan, a white former major leaguer who grew up just down the road in Dothan, Alabama.

Colton traces the entire season, writing about the extraordinary relationships among these players with Sullivan, and Colton tells their story by capturing the essence of Birmingham and its citizens during this tumultuous year. (The infamous Bull Connor, for example, when not ordering blacks to be blasted by powerful water hoses, is a fervent follower of the Barons and served as a long-time broadcaster of their games.)

By all accounts, the racial jeers and taunts that rained down upon these Birmingham players were much worse than anything that Jackie Robinson ever endured.

More than a story about baseball, this is a true accounting of life in a different time and clearly a different place. Seventeen years after Jackie Robinson had broken the color line in the major leagues, Birmingham was exploding in race riots....and now, they were going to have their very first integrated sports team. This is a story that has never been told.


message 98: by David (new)

David Arnaudo (DavidLloydArnaudo) | 30 comments 42 on Jackie Robinson was a great movie


message 99: by Alisa (new)

Alisa (MsTaz) | 5516 comments Thanks David. I haven't seen the movie yet but have been hearing great things about it.


message 100: by Alisa (new)

Alisa (MsTaz) | 5516 comments Baseball Between the Numbers: Why Everything You Know About the Game Is Wrong

Baseball Between the Numbers Why Everything You Know About the Game Is Wrong by Jonah Keri by Jonah Keri

Synopsis
In the numbers-obsessed sport of baseball, statistics don't merely record what players, managers, and owners have done. Properly understood, they can tell us how the teams we root for could employ better strategies, put more effective players on the field, and win more games. The revolution in baseball statistics that began in the 1970s is a controversial subject that professionals and fans alike argue over without end. Despite this fundamental change in the way we watch and understand the sport, no one has written the book that reveals, across every area of strategy and management, how the best practitioners of statistical analysis in baseball-people like Bill James, Billy Beane, and Theo Epstein-think about numbers and the game. Baseball Between the Numbers is that book. In separate chapters covering every aspect of the game, from hitting, pitching, and fielding to roster construction and the scouting and drafting of players, the experts at Baseball Prospectus examine the subtle, hidden aspects of the game, bring them out into the open, and show us how our favorite teams could win more games. This is a book that every fan, every follower of sports radio, every fantasy player, every coach, and every player, at every level, can learn from and enjoy.


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Books mentioned in this topic

Our Game: An American Baseball History (other topics)
Ty Cobb (other topics)
Baseball: The Golden Age (other topics)
Baseball (other topics)
Baseball: A History of America's Favorite Game (other topics)
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Authors mentioned in this topic

Charles C. Alexander (other topics)
George Vecsey (other topics)
Harold Seymour (other topics)
Geoffrey C. Ward (other topics)
Jules Tygiel (other topics)
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