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Constant Reader > What I'm Reading - April

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message 1: by Sherry, Doyenne (new)

Sherry | 7564 comments I'm still reading Chronic City, but mostly I'm holding babies.


message 3: by Sheila (last edited Apr 02, 2011 07:59AM) (new)

Sheila | 1099 comments Nice one Sherry, you need an extra arm, or two to manage a book as well :)

I have started reading The Yacoubian Building by Egyptian author Alaa Al Aswany Laila Lalami wrote an interest review of it on her blog when it first came out


message 4: by Mary Anne (new)

Mary Anne | 1387 comments I'm reading What I Loved, purchased at the local soon-to-be-closed Borders.

Finishing up on Dry Ice.

Sherry, who could blame you?


message 5: by John (new)

John | 1376 comments (from March thread)

Marge - I gave up on Major Pettigrew's Last Stand also; he was too brittle a character for me.

I've started Jessica Mitford's autobiography Irrepressible - can't say as I'm gripped by her early life, but willing to read on until she's older (say past 21).


message 6: by Ruth (new)

Ruth | 9352 comments I'm well into Brian Morton's A Window Across the River, and enjoying it very much. I need to thank someone here for recommending it.


message 7: by [deleted user] (new)

Right now I'm dipped solidly into Gregory Maguire's Wicked. I've never seen the play, heard about it though (who hasn't?) and wanted to know what the book behind it was like. So far it's okay.

The other book I'm reading is Do Androids Dream of Electric Sheep? by Philip K. Dick. Really liking that one so far, as I just watched Blade Runner a good week ago.

I'm behind.


message 8: by John (new)

John | 1376 comments Elisa:

I found the book incredibly sad, between Elphaba's personal life and the Animals-as-Holocaust-Victims angle. It is well written though.


message 9: by Mary Ellen (new)

Mary Ellen | 1292 comments John wrote: "(from March thread)

Marge - I gave up on Major Pettigrew's Last Stand also; he was too brittle a character for me.

I've started Jessica Mitford's autobiography [book:Irrepressible|..."


Sorry to read this about Major Pettigrew. I got a copy as a firstreads through GR and feel I have to read & review it. I'm hoping I'll like it a bit more!


message 10: by Carol (new)

Carol | 7030 comments Mary Ellen wrote: "John wrote: "(from March thread)

Marge - I gave up on Major Pettigrew's Last Stand also; he was too brittle a character for me.

I've started Jessica Mitford's autobiography [bo..."


I liked it a lot ME. I did not particularly like Wicked though. I didn't care enough to know the background about the wicked witch.


message 11: by Mary Ellen (new)

Mary Ellen | 1292 comments Thanks, Kitty!

And I've never been tempted by Wicked, either.


TheGirlBytheSeaofCortez (Madly77) | 3817 comments I didn't like Wicked. I did like Major Pettigrew's Last Stand.

I've just finished The Tiger's Wife and I'll stick with The Cairo Trilogy as long as my eyes hold out or until I get a magnifying glass.


message 13: by Susan_T. (new)

Susan_T. | 197 comments Ruth wrote: "I'm well into Brian Morton's A Window Across the River, and enjoying it very much. I need to thank someone here for recommending it."

Ruth, I really liked Starting Out In the Evening, which I read years ago. I'd like to catch up with Brian Morton's work. I'm glad to hear about this new book. I see that he'll be joining CRs in NYC in October. Cool! I hope to make it, though I have a college reunion around that time, too.


message 14: by Ruth (new)

Ruth | 9352 comments I liked Starting out in the Evening, too.


message 15: by Sara (new)

Sara (Seracat) | 1760 comments Finished the newest Maisie Dobbs this morning. A good outing, I think. Started the new Thursday Next this evening and it is quite good, and a nice new turn in the series.


message 16: by Lynn (new)

Lynn | 940 comments I'm a step or two behind you, Sara. I started the Maisie Dobbs book today and am about halfway through, and I have the Thursday Next book near the top of my TBR pile. I'm enjoying the new directions in the Maisie book so much that I just might finish it tomorrow.


message 17: by [deleted user] (new)

John said: Elisa:

I found the book incredibly sad, between Elphaba's personal life and the Animals-as-Holocaust-Victims angle. It is well written though.


I haven't gotten there yet, but I can see the set-up. I also think the whole good vs. evil notion being really evaluated is interesting. So far, Elphaba is, to me at least, a better person than Galinda. But I'm only to the point where they're in school together.

Gabrielle said: I didn't like Wicked.

Out of curiosity, why didn't you like it?


message 18: by Lillie (new)

Lillie | 2 comments I really enjoyed the Maisie Dobbs series. I discovered them last year and ended up reading all that are out. Actually, I just recommended them to a friend.

Sara wrote: "Finished the newest Maisie Dobbs this morning. A good outing, I think. Started the new Thursday Next this evening and it is quite good, and a nice new turn in the series."


message 19: by Rachelle (new)

Rachelle  Slater | 1 comments I'm reading Lost Horizon by James Hilton for my book club and I'm enjoying it.


message 20: by TheGirlBytheSeaofCortez (last edited Apr 03, 2011 07:51AM) (new)

TheGirlBytheSeaofCortez (Madly77) | 3817 comments Elisa wrote: "John said: Elisa:

I found the book incredibly sad, between Elphaba's personal life and the Animals-as-Holocaust-Victims angle. It is well written though.

I haven't gotten there yet, but I can see..."


It was sad, Elisa, so much of a downer for me. And most of all, I just couldn't relate to Elphaba. I don't know why. I liked her.

John, maybe I missed something important. We're the animals in Wicked Holocaust victims? I thought that was Beatrice and Virgil, which I found odd. Didn't like the ending. Maybe I'm mixing up parts of the two books.


message 21: by John (new)

John | 1376 comments Gabrielle -

The animals were initially dismissed from most professional jobs, just as Jews were (as an initial step), and then were increasingly persecuted - a direct parallel to 1930's German progression. I've never heard of Beatrice and Virgil before.


message 22: by Ruth (new)

Ruth | 9352 comments Rachelle wrote: "I'm reading Lost Horizon by James Hilton for my book club and I'm enjoying it."

Oh how I loved that book when I was a teen. I wonder how it holds up.


message 23: by Ann (new)

Ann | 2518 comments I just finished reading Paul Murray's Skippy Dies -which I loved. It's the best book I have read in over a year. Funny, poignant, thought-provoking, raunchy (the main characters are teenage boys, after all) - this book has it all.

Before that I read Kate Atkinson's Started Early, Took My Dog. I'm a real fan of Atkinsons' wit and stories, so I also thoroughly enjoyed this one.

And just for the record, I really liked Major Pettigrew's Last Stand, but I understand that you have to be a fan of British drawing room type comedies to like this kind of book.

I also wanted to thank people here who have recommended Brian Morton. I wouldn't have discovered him without you.

Ann


message 24: by John (new)

John | 1376 comments I am a fan of British drawing room type comedies; I thought the Major was insufferably pompous.


message 25: by Carol (new)

Carol | 7030 comments Ruth wrote: "Rachelle wrote: "I'm reading Lost Horizon by James Hilton for my book club and I'm enjoying it."

Oh how I loved that book when I was a teen. I wonder how it holds up."


I recently re read it and it held up very well for me.


message 26: by Flora (new)

Flora Smith (BookwormFlo) | 211 comments I just finished Tipping the Velvet which I really liked, 5 stars. I also just recently finished The Meaning of Night: A Confession which I thought was rather disappointing.

I think I'm gonna start The Wise Man's Fear


message 27: by Mary Ellen (new)

Mary Ellen | 1292 comments I am about 1/4 through Watchers of Time, the 5th book in the Ian Rutledge series, and am enjoying it so far. When I first started reading this series (with #3), I did not appreciate the character of Hamish -- a dead soldier whose voice haunts, and enters into dialogue with, Rutledge. I am still not fond of the device, but I see that this is my problem -- it fits the character well.

I wish I could read these series in order, but I am bound largely by the limitations of our library. Another thing I miss about NYC -- the library system was so large, I could generally read series in the order of publication. New Haven frequently has gaps in its collections.


message 28: by John (new)

John | 1376 comments I was advised by one of our librarians here to put in a purchase request in cases like that, as long as the book is currently in print. Add a note such as "New Haven currently has books 1, 2, 3 and 5 in its collection - please consider adding #4 to complete the series - thanks!"


message 29: by Cateline (new)

Cateline I've lately discovered the author Louise Penny, and almost finished the third in the series, The Cruelest Month: A Three Pines Mystery.


message 30: by Aloha (new)

Aloha | 39 comments Finished Flyboys: A True Story of Courage. Excellent book. I have to put it in my favorites. The author did not glorify war, but made me aware of the human side of it. The thing that struck me most is his noting that war is immoral. Yeah, you can give rhetorics to make war palatable, like, don't kill the civilians, and don't torture the people who bombed and killed your families and town, but, in the end, there is no morality in war.

Listening to Ayn Rand and the World She Made. While I do not agree with some aspects of her selfish philosophy, I admire her individuality and tenaciousness in making things happen for her to create her world, which is also what her philosophy is about. Fascinating biography about a fascinating woman. I don't want to stop listening to this. I'd hate to say this, but this is also inspirational for me as a woman.


message 31: by TheGirlBytheSeaofCortez (last edited Apr 03, 2011 11:19PM) (new)

TheGirlBytheSeaofCortez (Madly77) | 3817 comments John wrote: "Gabrielle -

The animals were initially dismissed from most professional jobs, just as Jews were (as an initial step), and then were increasingly persecuted - a direct parallel to 1930's German pro..."


Thank you, John. I see it now, but I admit, I missed that before.

Beatrice and Virgil is a novel by Yann Martel, wrote Life of Pi.

I love British drawing room comedies, too.

I'm now reading Of Bees and Mist and I love it! It's like no book I've ever read before.


message 32: by Jason (new)

Jason (JasonCT) | 34 comments Just finished Still Waters A Mystery by Nigel McCrery Still Waters: A Mystery Review can be found here: http://wp.me/pTRJE-4q


message 33: by Denise (new)

Denise | 389 comments Jason wrote: "Just finished Still Waters A Mystery by Nigel McCrery Still Waters: A Mystery Review can be found here: http://wp.me/pTRJE-4q"

I read the review, which made the book sound interesting, but usually mystery readers don't want the killer named ahead of time. Me, I read the last few pages first, so it doesn't matter. Does the reader know who the killer is from the beginning and then watch as the detectives unravel the mystery? In that case the review would not be a spoiler.


message 34: by Carol (new)

Carol | 7030 comments The Way We Live Now my first Trollope.


message 35: by Jason (last edited Apr 05, 2011 03:39PM) (new)

Jason (JasonCT) | 34 comments Denise wrote: "Jason wrote: "Just finished Still Waters A Mystery by Nigel McCrery Still Waters: A Mystery Review can be found here: http://wp.me/pTRJE-4q"

I read the review, which made th..."


I put a disclaimer in explaining that it wasn't a spoiler because the reader knows who the killer is from the beginning.

Thanks for reading the review Denise!


message 36: by Gail (new)

Gail | 295 comments In the middle of The Anatomy of Ghosts, which is getting better as I go along. Just started The Iliad; I plan to go slowly on that one, a re-read. Several others planned for this month.


message 37: by Ruth (new)

Ruth | 9352 comments Kitty wrote: "The Way We Live Now my first Trollope."

Have you seen the Masterpiece Theatre production? Excellent.


message 38: by Carol (new)

Carol | 7030 comments Ruth wrote: "Kitty wrote: "The Way We Live Now my first Trollope."

Have you seen the Masterpiece Theatre production? Excellent."


No I have not. The book is a bit wordy, but I am liking it thus far.


message 39: by Lyn (new)

Lyn | 696 comments I finished Ghostwritten today,and though I didn't love it, I was glad I read it. I was never, ever bored (for me, that is saying a lot), and it hangs in my head still. Looking forward to reading [[book:Cloud Atlas|49628] and Black Swan Green, but need a break before I travel again with Mitchell.

Wish I could start Freedom next, but I am #114 of 176 at the library for that one. I live in a very literate little town.

What did just come up for me today is Comes a Time for Burning, which I heard of here (thanks, sounds interesting), and I'll start next.


message 40: by Connie (last edited Apr 04, 2011 07:26PM) (new)

Connie | 107 comments For fun I am reading the 3rd installment of Brendan O'Carroll's lovable Irish Browne family - The Granny. For my local bookclub, I am reading Vanity Fair.
We will shortly be discusssing Kafka on the Shore - our March read. I hope to participate in another work for this group (meaning Constant Reader) real soon!


message 41: by Susan_T. (last edited Apr 04, 2011 07:30PM) (new)

Susan_T. | 197 comments Funeral for a Dog: A Novel written by Thomas Pletzinger and translated from the German by Ross Benjamin

This somewhat experimental (but not hard to follow) novel from a rising young German author takes place in Hamburg, New York (9/ll), Italy, the slums of Brazil. (I'm probably leaving out a location or two.) It's told from two points of view, Svensson, who has written a very popular children's book, and Mandelkern, a journalist who goes to interview him. A threesome (two men [though not Mandelkern], one woman) is at the center of the story about sex, love, and loss. Pletzinger sets up the book so that the reader, like the journalist, is only slowly able to put together the complex relationships here.

Cool book.

This was the second book in a row that I've read recently which featured a reclusive children's book author. What's up with that!


message 42: by Aloha (new)

Aloha | 39 comments I have Ghostwritten and Cloud Atlas on my list to read. Let me know what you think of Cloud Atlas.

Lyn wrote: "I finished Ghostwritten today,and though I didn't love it, I was glad I read it. I was never, ever bored (for me, that is saying a lot), and it hangs in my head still. Looking forward ..."


message 43: by Aloha (new)

Aloha | 39 comments I read that a few months ago. Loved it!

Connie wrote: "We will shortly be discusssing Kafka on the Shore - our March read. I hope to participate in another work for this group (meaning Constant Reader) real soon!


TheGirlBytheSeaofCortez (Madly77) | 3817 comments I had to give up on Of Bees and Mist. I thought I was going to love it, but the plot was too simplistic, everything was more fairytailish than magical realismish.

So, I've turned to a very realistic book - The Keeper of the Bees, which is so sadly overlooked. It's really a gem and a classic.


message 45: by Carol (new)

Carol | 7030 comments That sounds like a wonderful book Gabrielle. I look forward to your review.


message 46: by Scott (new)

Scott (SHissong) I finished Storm Front this morning. This was any easy, quick read. Very enjoyable.

I'm going to start A Game of Thrones so that I have at least the first one done by the time the series starts.


message 47: by Hazel (last edited Apr 05, 2011 12:12PM) (new)

Hazel | 363 comments Ruth wrote: "Kitty wrote: "The Way We Live Now my first Trollope."

Have you seen the Masterpiece Theatre production? Excellent."


I agree. You should try it, Kitty. Great cast. David Suchet as Melmotte; fabulous!

For a gentler Trollope, I recommend The Warden, one of my favourites.


message 48: by John (new)

John | 1376 comments I thought Mrs. Hirtle and Marie Melmotte were the two best acting jobs in the TV production.

As for The Warden, I found it incredibly boring; I don't feel it's needed at all to be able to get into Barchester Towers.


message 49: by Hazel (new)

Hazel | 363 comments John wrote: "I thought Mrs. Hirtle and Marie Melmotte were the two best acting jobs in the TV production.

As for The Warden, I found it incredibly boring; I don't feel it's needed at all to be ab..."


Which of them do you like best, John? I loved Barchester Towers as a child and The Warden as an adult. I still have a soft spot for Mr Harding. :-)

I'm working my way through the series now, and have just finished Framley Parsonage.


message 50: by Carol (new)

Carol | 7030 comments Thanks for the suggestions John ,Ruth and Hazel . I am enjoying this book, even if it is a bit wordy. I will see if netflix has the series.


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Books mentioned in this topic

Chronic City (other topics)
The Golden Ass or Metamorphoses (other topics)
Diaries Volume One: Prelude to Power: 1 (other topics)
Moby-Dick or, The Whale (other topics)
What I Loved (other topics)
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Authors mentioned in this topic

Brendan O'Carroll (other topics)
Ross Benjamin (other topics)
Thomas Pletzinger (other topics)
Avi Steinberg (other topics)
Elizabeth Stuckey-French (other topics)
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