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Frankenstein
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Authors, Books & Series > Frankenstein by Mary Shelley

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message 1: by Michael, Mod Prometheus (last edited Mar 30, 2011 01:01AM) (new) - rated it 5 stars

Michael (knowledgelost) | 1149 comments Mod
Frankenstein (Enriched Classics) by Mary Shelley
Frankenstein by Mary Shelley is my all time favourite. I have multiple copies of the book and have multiple interpretations of the story. The level of depth of this novel that is so incredible, every time I reread this book I discover more about it.

Love to hear people's thoughts on the book.


Carycleo | 28 comments This book was such a surprise to me when I read it, after seeing some clunky, simplistic movie adaptations over the years. I was really impressed by the thoughtfulness and the profundity of it. That sent me off to actually read Bram Stoker's Dracula and a few other classics that I had mistakenly thought were as unimpressive as the adaptations.

So, I have a definite fondness for this book. It's not one of my favorites, but I can certainly see why it would be yours. It's a very good book.

My all time favorite is probably Dune by Frank Herbert. A decade ago I might have said something else. A decade from now....? (Tell me it's okay that my absolute favorite is not exactly literary fiction. :))


message 3: by Kim, In Absentia (new) - rated it 2 stars

Kim (shirezu) | 589 comments Mod
From KL I've heard quite a lot of good about this book. I'm not normally a fan of Victorian era novels but I think it's time to give it a try.


message 4: by Michael, Mod Prometheus (new) - rated it 5 stars

Michael (knowledgelost) | 1149 comments Mod
I would say this book is pre-victorian, the romantic/gothic period


Jackie | 6 comments This book is absolutely worth the read! I had to read it in college - over a holiday weekend while I was at the river! LOL! It was absolutely no problem. I love to re-read this book and love to teach it (I've taught seniors for about 5 years and it's on our curriculum). Even more, I find it really does apply to today's science - with the very basic question of; just because we can, should we? Victor Frankenstein didn't think about this - and it didn't work out well...do we in our modern times?


Ruth Madison (Dev Love Press) (RuthMadison) | 18 comments This is a beautiful book, I was also surprised by it when I first read it.


message 7: by Michael, Mod Prometheus (new) - rated it 5 stars

Michael (knowledgelost) | 1149 comments Mod
It's a great choice for teaching, there is just so much you can pull out of it.


Franky | 399 comments Yes, I agree. I really love this book also. I have read it a few times and love the man vs. technology aspect to it.


message 9: by Michael, Mod Prometheus (new) - rated it 5 stars

Michael (knowledgelost) | 1149 comments Mod
I love the social aspect of this book. The monster was so lonely and all he wanted was a companion.


Franky | 399 comments Knowledge Lost wrote: "I love the social aspect of this book. The monster was so lonely and all he wanted was a companion."

Exactly, one of the more memorable points in the novel is the scene with the monster and the cottagers. I love how he is so deeply moved by their lives. This part of the novel always sticks out to me, where he hopes for friendship but feels a sense of betrayal from mankind.

On a side note, Young Frankenstein is one of my favorite films, and the parody of this scene is something I get a kick out of too.


Melki | 205 comments Don't you mean "Young FronkenstEEn", Franky? I had a crush on Gene Wilder for years after seeing that movie.


Candice | 11 comments One of the things I find so interesting about this novel is the difference in the subjects of compassionate responses it evokes.


Franky | 399 comments Melki wrote: "Don't you mean "Young FronkenstEEn", Franky? I had a crush on Gene Wilder for years after seeing that movie."

I forgot about the proper pronunciation :)

I remember that scene at the beginning where Gene Wilder is trying to distance himself from his father's legacy while his student is pestering him and questioning him....he finally blurts out "My father's work was doo-doo!" Too funny.

Getting back to the novel, I think there are so many morals, lessons and learning points from the reading of the novel. It really makes for a powerful experience.


Melki | 205 comments Beautifully written and very involving... and absolutely nothing like any of the Frankenstein movies I've ever seen - the monster can talk, he's not afraid of fire, and he doesn't dance to "Puttin' On the Ritz". (Thank you, Mel Brooks.)
Loved the book, KL. Might not have read it if not for your recommendation.


message 15: by Michael, Mod Prometheus (new) - rated it 5 stars

Michael (knowledgelost) | 1149 comments Mod
Melki wrote: "Beautifully written and very involving... and absolutely nothing like any of the Frankenstein movies I've ever seen - the monster can talk, he's not afraid of fire, and he doesn't dance to "Puttin'..."

Now that you've read it, what do you think this book taught you? I know of 10 different possible meanings of Frankenstein and people always take something away from it.


Melki | 205 comments Oh, man...I didn't know there was going to be a quiz!


message 17: by Michael, Mod Prometheus (new) - rated it 5 stars

Michael (knowledgelost) | 1149 comments Mod
Pop quiz ;)


Melki | 205 comments Sorry, I just read it for pure enjoyment. Am not prepared to analyze and discuss.


message 19: by Michael, Mod Prometheus (new) - rated it 5 stars

Michael (knowledgelost) | 1149 comments Mod
That's ok, you just fall this quiz, you better be prepared for the final exam


Melki | 205 comments Grrr! Next time I'll just read the Cliff's Notes!


message 21: by Michael, Mod Prometheus (new) - rated it 5 stars

Michael (knowledgelost) | 1149 comments Mod
Lol, cheat


Alanpalmer | 1 comments This book is a very different one from the stories told in the films (with the possible exception of Kenneth Brannagh an dRobert de Nero) and it covers some philosophical questions such as selfawareness. The language is quite oldfashioned but the story still reads as thrilling as many more modern, and to be honest less well written, works. It is one of the stories we all think we know but forget Hammer House of Horror and Universal Pictures: read the real thing.


 Danielle The Book Huntress (Angels Weep For Goodreads) (Gatadelafuente) Reading this right now. I like it. It's very readable and I feel deeply for the creature. Don't care much for Victor Frankenstein though.


message 24: by Michael, Mod Prometheus (new) - rated it 5 stars

Michael (knowledgelost) | 1149 comments Mod
That's awesome, I hope you enjoy it


message 25: by Whispers from the Pirate's Ghost (last edited Oct 24, 2011 06:58PM) (new) - rated it 5 stars

Whispers from the Pirate's Ghost Whisper (PirateGhost) I think this book was more of a expression of emotional pain. I tend to see the monster as more of a reflection of Victor Frankenstein. Not so much his bad side or good side, but his emotional side.

When I read even a little bit about Mary Shelley, I find one tragedy or disappointment after another. Her mother died when she was young. She had two children die very young. She eloped with Percy Shelley only to return and have her father disown her.

Have you ever felt so horrible over something that happened and tried to explain it to someone only to realize that they don't understand. To see that they don't "get" the depth of the pain and what it felt like to be you at that moment?

Mary Shelley was an intellectual, like a Mensa. She was married to Percy Shelley and friends with Brahms Stoker and Lord Tennyson. Her father was an intellectual. Plus, they are English (no offense to the English but sometimes you guys take that "Stiff upper lip thing" too far).

She had so much pain and anguish, yet I can't imagine anyone close to her forming an emotional connection or being able to express any understanding of such things, even when they are affected the same way. (I can't imagine it was easy on Percy to see Mary's Father turn away and be hurt by their decision to elope)

So here is Mary Shelley with all these stiff upper lips around her, expected to be the intellectual and not taken to emotional fits, with nobody around who understands her pain, nobody to really tell how she feels. Is she not like the monster she writes about? Utterly alone?

I think the story is autobiographical with Victor being more like her father, and others around her and her emotional self as the monster. Only the monster has a way to show Victor how she really feels. The monster can create the same sense of loneliness, loss and desperation in Victor by taking away those he loves, like Mary's children had been taken from her. The monster can take away Victor's wife, like she lost her father after she was married.

And at the end of the book, it's like the Poem "Ozymandias" nothing left and nothing for miles around, totally alone and he tells Victor "you’re like me." Now you understand my pain and anguish.

So what I learned from it, is how important it is to have someone close to you who, as Joe Pike (Robert Crais Stoic Hero) would put it, "Can see you." "See" meaning know who you are and understand what you’re going through.

I think what Mary Shelley is trying to say is that if you cannot get control of your emotions; they will destroy you from the inside out. The saddest part is, that I'm not sure she ever had someone who could help her let those emotions out in a healthy, cathartic way.

Again, maybe I assume too much but this is just my opinion, for what it's worth. I am kind of slow on the pickup sometimes.


Whispers from the Pirate's Ghost Whisper (PirateGhost) Eeek, sorry for the long post. I get a little verbose sometimes.


message 27: by Michael, Mod Prometheus (new) - rated it 5 stars

Michael (knowledgelost) | 1149 comments Mod
Very interesting post Hugh :)


Melki | 205 comments Very interesting, Hugh. Finding out about the author's life is a good way to learn and understand more about their work.
I'm sure KL will give you an A+ for your work.


Whispers from the Pirate's Ghost Whisper (PirateGhost) Melki wrote: "Very interesting, Hugh. Finding out about the author's life is a good way to learn and understand more about their work.
I'm sure KL will give you an A+ for your work."


Yay...I don't get many of those. THank you guys.


Jonathan (headspinningfromvagueness) I was studying this all year and it seems everyone on Goodreads was reading it too...

My take on the story depends on the passages you read. Frankenstein can be admired as a psychological horror story, a reflection of Shelley's life complete with feminist undertones and themes of rebellion and acceptance or it could be analysed as a philosophically pondering text.

Personally my favorite analysis is that Frankenstein is an exploration of what it is to be truly human. Because ultimately the novel reveals that both Victor and his creation are beasts. I really feel it is a challenge for men to recognize that there are two sides to every story: the creature and the creator and that there are two ways to be a monster.


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Books mentioned in this topic

Frankenstein; Or, the Modern Prometheus (other topics)
Frankenstein (other topics)

Authors mentioned in this topic

Mary Shelley (other topics)