The Readers Review: Literature from 1800 to 1910 discussion

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Archives 2011 Group Reads > "Jude the Obscure" by Thomas Hardy--Background Information & Resources

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Captain Sir Roddy, R.N. (Ret.) (captain_sir_roddy) | 1483 comments Mod
This is the folder for any and all background information and/or resources that you believe will enhance our reading experience of Thomas Hardy's last novel, Jude the Obscure.


message 2: by MadgeUK (last edited Mar 17, 2011 05:53AM) (new)

MadgeUK | 5214 comments Geography & Architecture in Jude

Here is an interactive map of Wessex, which was an Anglo-Saxon area of south west England resurrected by Hardy for his novels:-

http://www.st-andrews.ac.uk/~bp10/har...

Most of Hardy's novels are based on Dorset but for Jude he moved further north to Berkshire and Oxfordshire:-

http://www.itraveluk.co.uk/maps/england/

The first village to be mentioned is Cresscomb, where the miller lived and this is an old photo of a thatched cottage there, which features later in the novel:-

http://www.victorianweb.org/photos/ha...

Chapter 1 is headed Marygreen, where Jude lives. This village is based on Great Fawley in Berkshire (North Wessex} and is where Hardy's gandmother lived and where 'many of the thatched and dormered dwelling-houses had been pulled down of late years'. The Brown House, lived in by Hardy's grandmother and first mentioned in chapter 9, is still in Great Fawley:-

http://www.berkshirehistory.com/villa...

Berkshire still has the 'undulating' farmland Hardy describes (although it is not as beautiful as his beloved Dorset):-

http://farm3.static.flickr.com/2207/2...

The original church in Marygreen, like the one below, 'hump-backed, wood-turreted, and quaintly hipped, had been taken down':-

http://www.geograph.org.uk/photo/850766

It had been replaced by 'a tall new building of modern Gothic design, unfamiliar to English eyes'. This is the church which Hardy took as his model for the Marygreen Church and is one which he helped to rebuild:-

http://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia...

Hardy trained as an architect under Arthur Blomfield and his firm specialised in the Gothic Revival churches, which were then replacing the familiar old Anglo-Saxon and Norman ones. Like gothic literature, Gothic Revival architecture was 'all the rage' with early Victorians:-

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Gothic_R...

Jude is the most 'architecturally engaged' of Hardy's novels. This famous Gothic revival church was restored by Blomfield and Hardy, for which Hardy was awarded prizes by the Royal Institute of British Architects (RIBA). It is now Southwark Cathedral:-

http://www.heritage-images.com/Previe...

His poem the Heiress and the Architect reflects his architectural knowledge, the 'heiress' being his first wife Emma:-

http://www.poetry-archive.com/h/heire...

The town of Christminster and its university features heavily in the novel and this is modelled on Oxford, with its famous 'dreaming spires'. Oxford has the oldest University in the English speaking world, established in the 11C. Members of many religious orders settled in Oxford in the mid-13th century and maintained houses for students, so it became a centre for religious learning.

http://photos.worldisround.com/photos...

http://i.dailymail.co.uk/i/pix/2008/0...


message 3: by MadgeUK (last edited Mar 17, 2011 05:22AM) (new)

MadgeUK | 5214 comments Religion in Jude

The mid nineteenth century saw the impact of the controversial Oxford Movement(1833–1845), led among others by Cardinal Newman, Edward Pusey and others. It was also known as the Tractarian movement. Hardy’s early religious education has generally been described as 'fairly rigorous and consistently High Church, with regular attendance at the Tractarian service at Stinsford constructing an indispensable part of the Hardys’ family life and consequently exerting a major influence on the future writer’s memories and imagination...Whatever the early influence of the Church was on Hardy it is clear that Hardy, like many Victorians, began to separate from the traditional beliefs of the Church, as he grew older. (Jan Jedrzejewski : Thomas Hardy and the Church.)

Jederzewjewski also quotes Hardy as writing: '“In England doubt is beginning to spread, even in secluded country-places and among the lower middle class, which has so long remained thought-proof.” In his work Hardy creates clerical characters, who are depicted in different ways, changing as Hardy’s personal views change.' The criticism of religion in the book caused it to be burned publicly by the Bishop of Wakefield. (BTW there is a similar movement going on today with a rapprochement between the Catholic church and the CofE, brought about by recent controversies over homosexuality and female ordination. Twenty-six CofE bishops have defected to Rome.)

http://www.puseyhouse.org.uk/house/hi...

There are references to 'high' and 'low' church in Jude, which are terms used for different types of Church of England beliefs and services:-

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Low_chur...

Possible Spoiler: A very close friend of Hardy's, Horace Moule, was a member of the OM and both Hardy's and Moule's lives have some similarities to Jude's life:-

http://freepages.genealogy.rootsweb.a...

Trivia: Horace Moule'e father, Henry, invented the modern lavatory or earth closet:-

http://neal.oxborrow.net/Thomas_Hardy...


message 4: by MadgeUK (last edited Mar 18, 2011 07:58PM) (new)

MadgeUK | 5214 comments Women's sexuality in Jude:

Jude is the most sexually explicit of Hardy's works, which scandalised his readership and their reaction is thought to have caused him to retire from novel writing and to concentrate on poetry. In Daily Life in Victorian England Sally Mitchell discusses Victorian morality, as it relates to the way women were suppose to view sex. ”Some Victorian discussions of ideal womanhood insisted that a respectable girl should be completely ignorant about sex and sexuality until initiated by her husband on the wedding night. Significantly, most Victorians considered woman naturally pure and unsullied by sex or sexual desire”. A second aspect of Victorian morality, which Mitchell focuses on is respectability. “Respectability was another watchword. It was used as a primary social distinction, often more important than the class line.” Hardy uses the idea of Victorian respectability in a number of his works.

'The average twentieth-century reader is apt to miss the passages which so incensed the late Victorians because Hardy dealt with delicate matters obliquely' - so look out for them!

SPOILER: See also Chapter 5 in: http://books.google.co.uk/books?id=-O...


message 5: by MadgeUK (last edited Mar 17, 2011 06:03AM) (new)

MadgeUK | 5214 comments Railways in Jude

Railways were making a big impact on the rural countryside, rural occupations and upon social mobility in Hardy's time. He was a great railway traveller and there are numerous references to rail travel and its impact in Jude. His countryside, much of it unspoilt, can still be seen if you travel on the Great Western Railway from London to Dorset or Berkshire. This online book by one of our modern playwrights, details the influence that Hardy's novels had on Victorian tourism:-

http://www.hardysociety.org/pdfs/Benn...

The Great Western Railway (GWR), founded in 1833, was a British railway company that linked London with the south-west and west of England and most of Wales. It had a chequered history because of the different gauge it first used but was very popular because it took people to the warmer parts of Britain on the Cornish Riviera!

http://lionels.orpheusweb.co.uk/RailS...

Hardy wrote a number of poems about railway journeys and Midnight on the Great Western is a vignette of Victorian public transport, preserved forever:-

http://poemsandprose.blog.co.uk/2005/...

There are some old photos and sketches of the Southern Railway here, which also served parts of Dorset and Hampshire, and which Hardy would have known:-

http://mikes.railhistory.railfan.net/...

http://lh5.ggpht.com/_BmBpi8nUR5k/SPu...


message 6: by Rochelle (new)

Rochelle (Rochelle2) | 3271 comments Gee, Madge, why don't you do a little research. :)


message 7: by Lily (new)

Lily (Joy1) | 2578 comments Thx, Madge! Hope I get to a decent portion of these, as well as the reading. Appreciate the footwork.


message 8: by Rochelle (new)

Rochelle (Rochelle2) | 3271 comments I wish Madge wouldn't just jump into books without any knowledge of the author.


Captain Sir Roddy, R.N. (Ret.) (captain_sir_roddy) | 1483 comments Mod
Rochelle wrote: "I wish Madge wouldn't just jump into books without any knowledge of the author."

LOL! You are priceless, Rochelle, just priceless! ;-)


message 10: by Lily (last edited Mar 17, 2011 04:58PM) (new)

Lily (Joy1) | 2578 comments "Hardy and St. Paul: Patterns of Conflict in Jude the
Obscure"

http://digitalcommons.colby.edu/cgi/v...

The above article by Barbara Fass in the Colby Quarterly in 1974 may be of interest to some subset of you who have already read Jude. Despite currently sitting in on lectures on St. Paul (for the second time in the past few years), frankly, it largely goes over my head in terms of its arguments.


message 11: by Lily (new)

Lily (Joy1) | 2578 comments Those interested in comparing Hardy and Lawrence may find this dissertation of interest. I have, just for its discussion of some of the signal transitions from Victorian to Modernism and their impact on literature. (I haven't finished reading it yet - well, I have now. I would term as "worth reading" -- if not concerned about spoilers.)

http://soar.wichita.edu/dspace/bitstr...


message 12: by Deborah, Moderator (new)

Deborah (DeborahKliegl) | 3193 comments Mod
Wow! I'm already impressed with the quality of this group and I've only been here a few hours!


message 13: by Captain Sir Roddy, R.N. (Ret.) (last edited Mar 18, 2011 06:26AM) (new)

Captain Sir Roddy, R.N. (Ret.) (captain_sir_roddy) | 1483 comments Mod
Deborah wrote: "Wow! I'm already impressed with the quality of this group and I've only been here a few hours!"

LOL! Deborah, you ain't seen the half of it yet! ;-)

We are also one of the few, if not the only, group(s) with a full-time 'Director of Staff Research'--of our own, Ms. MadgeUK. She consistently finds the most fascinating background information and related materials that continues to provide all of us with a greatly enhanced reading experience. Just don't ask her to read Jane Austen though. ;-)


message 14: by Deborah, Moderator (new)

Deborah (DeborahKliegl) | 3193 comments Mod
Christopher - I've haven't gone thru all the background info yet, but it's nice to see it available for me as I read the book. Now I'm wishing for more eyes and more time so I can read more. Hmmmm, maybe it's time for me to quit my job so I can read (only kidding).


Captain Sir Roddy, R.N. (Ret.) (captain_sir_roddy) | 1483 comments Mod
Deborah wrote: "Christopher - I've haven't gone thru all the background info yet, but it's nice to see it available for me as I read the book. Now I'm wishing for more eyes and more time so I can read more. Hmmmm..."

Yes, I know exactly what you mean! ;-)


message 16: by MadgeUK (last edited Mar 18, 2011 02:32AM) (new)

MadgeUK | 5214 comments ROFL Rochelle - I am such a lazy old so-and-so aren't I:D.

Chris wrote: ...with a full-time 'Director of Staff Research

LOL Chris, aint it wonderful what Retirement and Idleness can do!


message 17: by MadgeUK (last edited Mar 18, 2011 05:59AM) (new)

MadgeUK | 5214 comments Lily wrote: ""Hardy and St. Paul: Patterns of Conflict in Jude the
Obscure"


Thanks Lily. A really excellent essay well worth reading but a word of warning folks, it has SPOILERS right from the first page, so all you 'virgins' who don't want to know nuffin, don't read it until you have finished the novel! :D.

Without revealing anything I can say that Fass urges us to look hard at Hardy's Preface to Jude http://en.wikisource.org/wiki/Jude_th... which was 'insufficiently heeded by critics' and where Hardy said he was writing about the "deadly war waged between flesh and spirit", which reminds me of my plea elsewhere to look at the big themes of this novel and not get too bogged down in the minutae of the relationships. He is also writing about the Ideal and whether it can be attained, so Fass expounds on this.

Fass also points out that Jude is a Bildungsroman which touches on Hardy's own life and I think Chris will want to post something about that when he heads up the chapters.

Finally, much of Fass's essay deals with Hardy's fascination with St Paul and she quotes vii 19: "For the good that I would I do not; but the evil which I would not, that I do" as being important to his conception of Jude, together with another more revealing verse. She also reminds us that 'Hardy had contemplated an ecclesiastical career'. Those of you who are biblical scholars (like Lily) may be able to offer other readers some guidance on this as we go along so if you can bear to be deflowered by Fass' commentary before getting to the end of the novel, we could benefit from your reading of the essay:).


message 18: by MadgeUK (new)

MadgeUK | 5214 comments Lily wrote: "Those interested in comparing Hardy and Lawrence may find this dissertation of interest. I have, just for its discussion of some of the signal transitions from Victorian to Modernism and their imp..."

Another great essay (with SPOILERS) Lily - thanks! Lawrence admired Hardy and his later writing about sexuality was thought to have been inspired by him - which Everyman will not like one bit! :D.


message 19: by Everyman (new)

Everyman | 3459 comments Deborah wrote: "Hmmmm, maybe it's time for me to quit my job so I can read"

It's called retirement.


message 20: by MadgeUK (last edited Mar 18, 2011 11:33AM) (new)

MadgeUK | 5214 comments Hardy makes use of West Country dialects in Jude. I couldn't find a good audio clip for Berkshire or Oxfordshire but here is a nice example of the Dorset dialect, with which he would have been more familiar and which perhaps Jude's Aunt Drusilla, who is supposedly modelled on Hardy's grandmother, would have used. Click on 'Watch Dorset dialect being spoken':-

http://www.bbc.co.uk/dorset/content/a...

And look at the Quirky Placenames too!


message 21: by Everyman (new)

Everyman | 3459 comments With all these wonderful resources telling us what the themes of the book are, discussing its meaning and content, with all we know before we start the discussion, I'm wondering whether there's any point in actually reading the book.


message 22: by Captain Sir Roddy, R.N. (Ret.) (last edited Mar 18, 2011 02:57PM) (new)

Captain Sir Roddy, R.N. (Ret.) (captain_sir_roddy) | 1483 comments Mod
Everyman wrote: "With all these wonderful resources telling us what the themes of the book are, discussing its meaning and content, with all we know before we start the discussion, I'm wondering whether there's any..."

Of course there is, these materials are provided here to enhance everyone's reading experience. If you believe that they could, in fact, detract from your personal reading experience, I would strongly urge you to consider NOT delving into any of them. I certainly would never turn down a visit to Stonehenge because it might alter my experience reading "Tess of the d'Urbervilles", and a visit might actually make that scene even more relevant and meaningful.

This is a great spot to have a brief philosophical discussion about 'the commons' and 'shared experiences'--

There are generally two schools of thought when it comes to art appreciation and criticism, and I include music, visual arts and media, and literature under the broad term "Art."

The first school of thought would generally have the new viewer, reader, or listener come at the 'piece' under consideration completely cold, i.e., with no background information, knowledge of authorial intent, or even social context in which the piece is placed. The viewer, listener, or reader is left to make up his/her mind based upon their own reference points and personal experiences and their personal response to that specific work. This works for some folks just fine.

The other school comes at it in a slightly different fashion. The viewer, listener, or reader still has their own individual experiential evaluation process, but also places some reliance before, during, and after the actual viewing, listening, or reading on the 'shared experience' with 'the commons.' In other words, not only do you have your own response to and experience with the work, but you gain additional knowledge through the shared experiences of others. For example, you might gain insight on your favorite author by reading a detailed biography before you have read one or more of their seminal works. This gives you some measure of additional information and knowledge that actually may provide you with a deeper understanding of that work when you do finally read it. Does it detract from your overall experience? For some it may, and for others it will enhance it.

Finally, as a landscape photographer I love to think of it like this--

I can stand on the west coast of North America by myself and watch the sun slowly set below the horizon, and simply marvel at the beauty of the moments that I am witnessing. I know that it is a beautiful scene, and I even know why it is a beautiful scene. But if I am standing there with my wife, and my little grandson; each of us silently watching; I gain an even more profound appreciation and more meaningful experience of what I am witnessing because I can see the smile on their faces and the sense of peace and calm that they are also experiencing. This ability of shared experiences and reliance upon the 'commons' is what sets us apart from most, if not all, other species on the planet.

So, my final word is--

If you believe that looking at any of the background reading information and resources could be detrimental to your own personal reading experience; by all means do not look at it. If you would like to learn more about Hardy's Wessex, life in Victorian England, spoken dialects of Dorset, the architecture of Oxford, issues associated with religion or sexuality, or D.H. Lawrence's thoughts about Hardy's craft as a writer, and so forth, well have at it. I'd like to take a moment to thank Madge, and others, for all of the time and hard work that they've put into assembling all of this material for us to peruse.

Cheers! Chris


message 23: by Everyman (new)

Everyman | 3459 comments Christopher wrote: "Finally, as a landscape photographer I love to think of it like this--
"


I take your point, but I think your example isn't apt to the situation. The difference between you looking at the sunset and you sharing your thoughts with others is the difference between reading alone at home with nobody to discuss the book with, and reading in this group setting where we do discuss the group. Obviously we all think the latter approach is valuable, or we wouldn't be here.

That's a different thing from checking numerous sources before you go to the shore to find out what you should look for in the sunset, what sunset critics have written about the sunsets in this vicinity and their thoughts on the right way to interact with and interpret the sunset, how these sunsets compare with sunrises on the other side of the country, etc.

But you do make a fair point about the two ways of approaching a book, whether for example you want to discover the themes on your own and in discussions with other readers as they unfold in the text as you read along together, or whether you want to know in advance what the critics think are the themes you should look for, how others interpret the book, and other information to have in hand before you open the book.

As you say, two different approaches. It just struck me that for this text/discussion we have far more advance material laid out, including many discussions with major "spoilers," than I recall having for any texts we have discussed here to date. It seemed a change in approach, and worth a comment.


Captain Sir Roddy, R.N. (Ret.) (captain_sir_roddy) | 1483 comments Mod
Everyman, my example of the sunset experience was intended to illustrate the notion of the value, to me, through shared experiences.

I also have to say that I have looked at all of the resources and information that has been provided, and where appropriate and/or applicable it has been marked as potentially 'spoilery'. Also, none of the information is telling a reader how to view or interpret "Jude", that is left to the reader and for our subsequent discussions. Finally, the general themes of "Jude" are even referenced in the brief book blurbs attached to the Goodreads page for each varying edition. Pretty common knowledge, I'd say.

In sum, I'd say that we have set up this group to cater to members of either school of thought described above. And that, my friend, is just as it should be. I think if you go back and look at the discussions we shared with Eliot's "Adam Bede" you'll find that we had beaucoup background resources and materials too.

Anyway, it is all good. I, for one, can't wait for March 21st to arrive so that we can dive into the novel! Cheers!


message 25: by Everyman (new)

Everyman | 3459 comments Christopher wrote: "Everyman, my example of the sunset experience was intended to illustrate the notion of the value, to me, through shared experiences.."

On which we totally agree, else we would not be here having this conversation.


message 26: by MadgeUK (last edited Mar 18, 2011 07:56PM) (new)

MadgeUK | 5214 comments Chris wrote: These materials are provided here to enhance everyone's reading experience.....I'd like to take a moment to thank Madge, and others, for all of the time and hard work that they've put into assembling all of this material for us to peruse.

Thanks Chris. I know that when we set this book club up, these were your views (and mine) about background information and I have accordingly provided it for each of our reads, as have others. Everyman runs a separate club and is, of course, able to make his own rules there.

I will post the rest of my response on the Cafe & Croissants thread as this conversation is not part of background information/resources.


message 27: by Rochelle (new)

Rochelle (Rochelle2) | 3271 comments MadgeUK wrote: "Women's sexuality in Jude:

Jude is the most sexually explicit of Hardy's works, which scandalised his readership and their reaction is thought to have caused him to retire from novel writing and t..."


Ooh, ooh, what are the dirty passages?


message 28: by MadgeUK (new)

MadgeUK | 5214 comments Wait and see, you naughty gel!:D.


message 29: by Everyman (new)

Everyman | 3459 comments Rochelle wrote: "Ooh, ooh, what are the dirty passages? ..."

By modern standards, you'll hardly recognize them as being sexual, let alone dirty.


message 30: by Rochelle (new)

Rochelle (Rochelle2) | 3271 comments Everyman wrote: "Rochelle wrote: "Ooh, ooh, what are the dirty passages? ..."

By modern standards, you'll hardly recognize them as being sexual, let alone dirty."


You're so literal.


message 31: by Bill (last edited Mar 19, 2011 12:30PM) (new)

Bill (BIll_B) | 605 comments Everyman wrote: "By modern standards, you'll hardly recognize them as being sexual, let alone dirty. "

Have you ever attempted to read Marquis de Sade?
I have -- as an unfortunate consequence of being an adolescent roaming free in the library. Being an adolescent, I was pulled, like a magnet, to that little corner of the library.

I feel very confident in saying that smut from those days was much dirtier then smut nowadays.

Maybe thats because it was illegal. Or because men back in those days had completely different smut sensibilities. Who knows.


message 32: by MadgeUK (new)

MadgeUK | 5214 comments Lest we get off topic, I have answered you in the Cafe Bill:).


message 33: by Bill (last edited Mar 19, 2011 01:11PM) (new)

Bill (BIll_B) | 605 comments MadgeUK wrote: "Lest we get off topic, I have answered you in the Cafe Bill:)."

Don't see the cafe thread. Was assuming you meant the croissants and tea thread..but don't see your posting there either.


message 34: by MadgeUK (new)

MadgeUK | 5214 comments Yes that one - I have just posted there!! :D.


message 35: by Nicki (new)

Nicki | 4 comments I finished reading this book a few weeks ago and really loved it. I've been working on reading Hardy's major novels over the past year and Jude marked the completion of that endeavor.

I'm a bit of a literary novice so I imagine that there will be more for me to absorb than to add - but in either case I'll be tuning into the discussion.

I look forward to hearing what everyone thinks. The links provided thus far are excellent - they have already broadened my horizons when thinking about this immense novel. Thank you!


Captain Sir Roddy, R.N. (Ret.) (captain_sir_roddy) | 1483 comments Mod
Madge, I am so glad that you posted the map of Wessex and all of these fabulous photographs! I just looked at the photos of the houses and St. Mary's church, and the rolling countryside. This really does help gel the images in my head as I reading. I always love Hardy's descriptions of the landscape and the landmarks that his characters encounter on their to-and-fros. Hardy's characters always seem to be prodigious walkers too. Again, thanks for all of these wonderful references; and I encourage those participating in the group read to visit the links in this section. Cheers!


message 37: by MadgeUK (new)

MadgeUK | 5214 comments Thanks Chris - I am making passing references to them as we read.


message 38: by Lily (new)

Lily (Joy1) | 2578 comments Christopher wrote: "...Just don't ask her to read Jane Austen though. ;-) "

ROFLOL! At least David Shapard has done a considerable job with his The Annotated Pride and Prejudice as a "substitute" for our in-house researcher!


message 39: by Lily (new)

Lily (Joy1) | 2578 comments Christopher wrote: "...Just don't ask her to read Jane Austen though. ;-) "

ROFLOL! At least David Shapard has done a considerable job with his The Annotated Pride and Prejudice as a "substitute" for our in-house researcher!


message 40: by MadgeUK (last edited Mar 30, 2011 06:41AM) (new)

MadgeUK | 5214 comments Those interested in further reading might like to look at Chapter 2 from Dorothy Bryant's book A Literary Lynching which details the problems Hardy had with Tess and Jude in particular. This extract is sad:-

'In his Postscript to the new [1912] edition, recounting his experience in which "the sad feature of the attack" was that the story he told, that of "shattered ideals of the two chief characters . . . was practically ignored by the adverse press of the two countries." Critics later "discovered that Jude was a moral work—austere in its treatment of a difficult subject," but it was too late, "the experience completely curing me of further interest in writing novels." All could be summarized by saying, "We Britons hate ideas." '

BEWARE SPOILERS:-

http://dorothybryant.com/2-LitLynchin...


message 41: by MadgeUK (last edited Mar 31, 2011 04:15AM) (new)

MadgeUK | 5214 comments There are some good photos of 'Hardy country' here, including a couple that are pertinent to Jude. I don't think they are Spoilers:-


http://mysite.verizon.net/hardycountr...


Captain Sir Roddy, R.N. (Ret.) (captain_sir_roddy) | 1483 comments Mod
Awesome photographs, Madge! I simply can't wait to actually visit this country myself with my daughter! I think this is a fine example of a picture being worth thousands of words. Having these images really does help place the reader right in the midst of Hardy's beloved Wessex!

Speaking of Under the Greenwood Tree, I'd love to read this sometime with the group, and explore the folk music of Dick Dewey and the rest of his players. What a delightful Hardy novel that is!


message 43: by MadgeUK (last edited Mar 31, 2011 10:40AM) (new)

MadgeUK | 5214 comments And I very much look forward to meeting you both Chris!

Yes, Under the Greenwood Tree would be a nice read and folk music (and dancing) is right up my street. In fact I will be visiting Dorset again for the International Folk Festival in Sidmouth during the first week in August - can you make it for that week?:-

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Sidmouth...

And my grandchildren will be 'busking' too. I bought my grand-daughter a roll-up piano to take with her, to add to her guitar and fiddle repertoire!

Some music and dance for you here, to whet your appetite. It is great fun!!:-

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=xWkmLd...

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=6hBGML...

This is a naughty old one Hardy would have known:-

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Jgidfx...

This is what my grand-daughter aspire's to!:-

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Bv8Ltc...

Americans get there too!

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=zgxNU9...


message 44: by MadgeUK (last edited Mar 31, 2011 11:04AM) (new)

MadgeUK | 5214 comments I hope Everyman enjoys these links too - I know he was a member of the English Folk Dancing Society in his youf.



Here is my busking granddaughter (I don't have a decent photo of her brother playing African drums, he always pulls a face at the camera):-

http://family.webshots.com/photo/2530...


Captain Sir Roddy, R.N. (Ret.) (captain_sir_roddy) | 1483 comments Mod
MadgeUK wrote: "I hope Everyman enjoys these links too - I know he was a member of the English Folk Dancing Society in his youth.

Here is my busking granddaughter (I don't have a decent photo of her brother play..."


Wonderful photograph, Madge! What a fun way to spend some time at the beach!


message 46: by Cathleen (new)

Cathleen I've just finished reading Part Second: At Christminster and have wandered here to take a look. I'm still mulling over what I've read.

I've enjoyed reading and viewing the maps and photographs (Geography & Architecture). They've enhanced my reading experience. Thank you for posting them.

I've had the biography of Thomas Hardy by Claire Tomalin on my TBR shelf for quite some time. I think that has to be bumped up to the top of the list now!


message 47: by Everyman (new)

Everyman | 3459 comments Cathleen wrote: "I've had the biography of Thomas Hardy by Claire Tomalin on my TBR shelf for quite some time. I think that has to be bumped up to the top of the list now!
"


It's well worth reading.


message 48: by MadgeUK (new)

MadgeUK | 5214 comments Cathleen wrote: "I've just finished reading Part Second: At Christminster and have wandered here to take a look. I'm still mulling over what I've read.

I've enjoyed reading and viewing the maps and photographs ..."


Glad you enjoyed them Cathleen and Welcome! I hope you enjoy reading with us and look forward to your contributions. Do read Tomalin, it is an excellent biography and she is very readable.


message 49: by Cathleen (new)

Cathleen Thank you for the welcome, and I'm certain I'll enjoy reading with the group. The discussions threads I've read so far have been sparkling.


Captain Sir Roddy, R.N. (Ret.) (captain_sir_roddy) | 1483 comments Mod
Cathleen, I also highly recommend Claire Tomalin's excellent biography of Hardy. What I loved about it was that she really delved into the emotional side of Hardy--i.e., his feelings, and what drove him. I also read Michael Millgate's biography; and while maybe a touch more scholarly, I felt I gained much more insight into Hardy--the man--with Tomalin's. Finally, as Madge said, Tomalin is incredibly readable. Enjoy!


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Books mentioned in this topic

Jude the Obscure (other topics)
Pride and Prejudice (other topics)
Under the Greenwood Tree (other topics)
To Have But Not To Hold: A History Of Attitudes To Marriage And Divorce In Australia 1858 1975 (other topics)

Authors mentioned in this topic

Marquis de Sade (other topics)