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message 1: by Jaime (new)

Jaime (Janastasiow) So I'm just curious, how many English teachers are in this group? I'm one (the reason for the question). I find at my school many of the teachers aren't readers, which is disheartening.


message 2: by Everyman (new)

Everyman | 2215 comments I was one many years ago, spent five years in the classroom, then five more split between teaching and administration, then moved on to other things. (I get bored with doing the same thing for too long; once I think I have it figured out, I need a new challenge.)


message 3: by Jaime (new)

Jaime (Janastasiow) Everyman wrote: "I was one many years ago, spent five years in the classroom, then five more split between teaching and administration, then moved on to other things. (I get bored with doing the same thing for too..."

I can understand that, which is why I left every other profession. I must say for the first time in my life I'm not bored, and I love my job!


Susanna - Censored by GoodReads (SusannaG) | 636 comments My mother is a retired English professor (she's a member here, but not a very active one).


message 5: by Jaime (new)

Jaime (Janastasiow) I just have a feeling a lot of us in the groups are, but I could be wrong.


message 6: by Tango (new)

Tango | 19 comments I'm an English teacher too and agree with your comment about the number of teachers who read. Many in my faculty say that they don't have the time, but they still manage to watch plenty of TV, etc. I love my job and love it when the students get switched on to reading. Last week I had a lengthy conversation about Harry Potter with a boy who has learning difficulties. His recall of various aspects of the text was amazing. What could be more rewarding than that?


message 7: by Jaime (new)

Jaime (Janastasiow) I totally agree. Nothing is more frustrating than colleagues who always know what happened on Dexter but they haven't read a book in ages. And yes I make sure my kids have free reading time. It's so rewarding seeing the difference books and reading makes in their lives.


message 8: by Robin (new)

Robin (goodreadscomtriviagoddessl) I am not a teacher but I work in the field as an adult supervisor. Have worked at numerous preschools, have an Associates in Early Childhood Education, would have loved to be a teacher, but am too old. Love the English language, would have probably been an English teacher, love words, writing, etc. My grandmother was an Art Teacher, my mother was a bank teller instructor.


message 9: by LauraT (new)

LauraT (LauraTa) | 513 comments I wanted to become one, but things in Italy are sometimes weird: I couldn't enter in school when I finished my studies, and when things cleared I was already working at the Informagiovani of my time, and I was pregnant with my second child. No time to study anymore ...


message 10: by Jaime (new)

Jaime (Janastasiow) LauraT wrote: "I wanted to become one, but things in Italy are sometimes weird: I couldn't enter in school when I finished my studies, and when things cleared I was already working at the Informagiovani of my tim..."

Yeah it really is hard. Here in the states you have to be able to afford to not work for 6 months during student teaching, which not only isn't paid but you pay the university a few thousand as it's a class you're taking to finish your credential. That's why I had to wait until I was 30 to do it. I don't have kids, though.


message 11: by Robin (new)

Robin (goodreadscomtriviagoddessl) I am in my 50's so I think I will stick with what I love, which is not the teaching aspect but the everyday blossoming of the children, which as teachers, the children don't open up to them as much. Sometimes the teacher is too busy with assignments and I do feel for them. But what I do is my small contribution to the educational field.


message 12: by Jaime (new)

Jaime (Janastasiow) Robin wrote: "I am in my 50's so I think I will stick with what I love, which is not the teaching aspect but the everyday blossoming of the children, which as teachers, the children don't open up to them as much..."

My students would disagree with you...


message 13: by Robin (new)

Robin (goodreadscomtriviagoddessl) Well some teachers here at this particular school seem to not listen to the children when they have concerns. Especially when my daughter was at this particular school, some of her teachers were good, others not so good. This is merely my impression and also in talking with the teachers. some will not even bother to listen, they are the ones I avoid at all costs.


message 14: by Jaime (new)

Jaime (Janastasiow) Robin wrote: "Well some teachers here at this particular school seem to not listen to the children when they have concerns. Especially when my daughter was at this particular school, some of her teachers were g..."

Not all are like this. There are girls I haven't had for 3 years who still call me on the phone for help. I'm not saying we're all this way but I take my job very seriously and put a good 90 hours a week in. Usually it takes more time because before and after school along with my prep period I'm helping students with their personal problems, which sometimes are very serious. I understand where you're coming from as I see it all the time and it madens me, I'm just saying don't stereotype.


message 15: by Robin (new)

Robin (goodreadscomtriviagoddessl) I am not, there are wonderful teachers at the school. I just don't associate with the ones who aren't. I have been here seven years so I have seen teachers and other faculty members come and go. Most times the children know who to go to to ask for help, be it personal problems, etc. I am glad that you are out there helping your students at your school. I have more contact with the students than the teachers, which should be the case.


message 16: by Jaime (new)

Jaime (Janastasiow) Yes, I agree. It really is part of our job. I mean we literally are in loco parentis or teacher acting as parent. During the day we have that role and I think those who don't fulfill it are being lazy and more worried about their own free time. Either way how can a student learn when too many things are going on and he/she can't focus? Really we do need to help them fix things first before we can ask them to do our work and care about school. At least that's how I see it.


message 17: by Everyman (new)

Everyman | 2215 comments Robin wrote: "I am not, there are wonderful teachers at the school. I just don't associate with the ones who aren't. ..."

The ones who bother me most, after those who see teaching as an easy life and really don't like or care about kids, are those who send newsletters or other things home with a raft of misspellings, incorrect grammar, or other simple mistakes that make one wonder why these people think they can teach my child anything, and what college gave them a degree? I have a relative, not one of my immediate family thank goodness, who was an elementary school teacher for years, who regularly misuses its and it's, misuses lie and lay, misspells something (often several somethings) in almost everything she sends us. She even sent us an invitation to her parents fourtyth wedding aniversary, I kid you not. It was painful to read.


message 18: by Jaime (new)

Jaime (Janastasiow) Everyman wrote: "Robin wrote: "I am not, there are wonderful teachers at the school. I just don't associate with the ones who aren't. ..."

The ones who bother me most, after those who see teaching as an easy life..."


Wow, that's really bad. I had a principal who did that, and I sometimes hesitate using her letter of rec.


message 19: by Anna (last edited Feb 21, 2011 07:47AM) (new)

Anna | 598 comments Jaime wrote: "So I'm just curious, how many English teachers are in this group? I'm one (the reason for the question). I find at my school many of the teachers aren't readers, which is disheartening."

I teach college students, writing and intro to lit/ theatre type classes. I keep running into more and more teachers on goodreads, which is very heartening. My high school experiences were all good, even in loathed American Lit, but I think that on the whole there are too many teachers out there who are no longer passionate about the subject. I blame the public school prison, I mean system.


message 20: by [deleted user] (new)

I'm a language arts teacher by day, history teacher by night. I work with middle school students and college students, so I see the profession from two very different perspectives.


message 21: by Anna (new)

Anna | 598 comments Kristi wrote: "I'm a language arts teacher by day, history teacher by night. I work with middle school students and college students, so I see the profession from two very different perspectives."

I have friends who do similar role switches form daytime public schools to eyeing adult ed or community colleges. It is two very different perspectives on teaching. Do your middle schoolers seem motivated?


message 22: by Jaime (new)

Jaime (Janastasiow) Anna wrote: "Kristi wrote: "I'm a language arts teacher by day, history teacher by night. I work with middle school students and college students, so I see the profession from two very different perspectives."..."

One of my friends has his Ph.d and he does the same. Full time English teacher including AP at high school and then teaches at three community colleges at night.


message 23: by Jaime (new)

Jaime (Janastasiow) Anna wrote: "Jaime wrote: "So I'm just curious, how many English teachers are in this group? I'm one (the reason for the question). I find at my school many of the teachers aren't readers, which is dishearten..."

It bothers me to no end that there are teachers who don't want to be there anymore and who should probably have been out a few years ago when there are teachers out of work who really want to help the students.


message 24: by Robin (last edited Feb 21, 2011 05:56PM) (new)

Robin (goodreadscomtriviagoddessl) I have had three experiences of teachers who should have been out at the elementary level, one slept during story telling, teacher was reading story, and fell asleep, she was definitely ready to retire soon, another teacher who has been there upwards of 20 something years and is counting her days probably. My daughter's 6th grade teacher who is still in the system but is now a GT teacher, and she should have just retired. And the principal is hardly there, so we have a General Assistant who is inept as well. I am just grousing. My daughter's third grade teacher was more into her correcting her work, and would red ink everything, and during gingerbread house decorating was berating her for being more organized, what that had to do with decorating, I don't know, the teacher"lost " the spice drops that I brought for said gingerbread decorating, and she called my daughter disorganized. Get real, lady.


message 25: by Scott (new)

Scott (Karlstadt) | 125 comments LauraT wrote: "I wanted to become one, but things in Italy are sometimes weird: I couldn't enter in school when I finished my studies, and when things cleared I was already working at the Informagiovani of my tim..."


message 26: by Scott (new)

Scott (Karlstadt) | 125 comments It sounds like student teaching is harder now than it was 40 years ago, when my wife student-taught in Art Education. She worked 3 jobs at her college to help pay the $1500 (fifteen hundred) per semester for room, board, and tuition combined.


message 27: by Scott (new)

Scott (Karlstadt) | 125 comments Jaime wrote: "Yes, I agree. It really is part of our job. I mean we literally are in loco parentis or teacher acting as parent. During the day we have that role and I think those who don't fulfill it are bein..."


message 28: by Scott (new)

Scott (Karlstadt) | 125 comments Jaime, you sound like you consider teaching more than just a pay check.
My wife got out of teaching after being physically injured by a student. Before she was taken out of the school on a gurney, she took the student to the principals office.
The principal told my wife: "Don't you dare touch one of my students again! The principal scolded my wife that she had set up the school for a lawsuit.


message 29: by Scott (new)

Scott (Karlstadt) | 125 comments Jaime wrote: "Anna wrote: "Kristi wrote: "I'm a language arts teacher by day, history teacher by night. I work with middle school students and college students, so I see the profession from two very different p..."


message 30: by Scott (new)

Scott (Karlstadt) | 125 comments My years at Community Colleges, in the '60's, '90's and now were more grounded and practical than my years in Liberal Arts Colleges. Also, Community Colleges introduced me to writers such as George B. Shaw and Voltaire, who are still 'ahead of their time'


message 31: by Geoff (new)

Geoff (wwwgoodreadscomchiltsy) | 16 comments Jaime wrote: "So I'm just curious, how many English teachers are in this group? I'm one (the reason for the question). I find at my school many of the teachers aren't readers, which is disheartening."

I'm a teacher of English and drama. It's not the teaching I hate, it's the system that goes with it.


message 32: by MadgeUK (last edited Mar 12, 2011 02:35AM) (new)

MadgeUK Jaime wrote: It bothers me to no end that there are teachers who don't want to be there anymore and who should probably have been out a few years ago...

All too many good teachers have had to leave the profession because of extreme violence in the classroom, especially those teaching in the inner-cities. My eldest daughter, an experienced youth leader, left a good job in the building industry to take a teaching degree, with the aim of encouraging more girls into craft, design and technology. She was threatened and attacked several times with the very tools she was trying to teach the teenagers how to use, had fireworks thrown at her, and her car was vandalised in the playground. She finally left when, after putting her arm around the shoulders of a crying girl, she was accused of sexual assault! She is now part of an architectural team building 'schools for the future', a far less harassing way of promoting education!


message 33: by Amalie (last edited Mar 13, 2011 10:36PM) (new)

Amalie  | 129 comments Jaime wrote: "So I'm just curious, how many English teachers are in this group? I'm one (the reason for the question). I find at my school many of the teachers aren't readers, which is disheartening."

I'm a teacher of English (second language) and Literature mainly poetry and drama. I absolutely love teaching, although it's stressful at times not because of the teaching part but because of the administration part. I don't think most people realize (no matter which part of the world you are from) being a teacher is such a huge task.

I think many teachers aren't reading because there's too much work. I'm bit of a bibliomaniac so I somehow manage my time but I'm yet to finish the first Harry Potter book.


message 34: by Geoff (new)

Geoff (wwwgoodreadscomchiltsy) | 16 comments Amalie wrote: "Jaime wrote: "So I'm just curious, how many English teachers are in this group? I'm one (the reason for the question). I find at my school many of the teachers aren't readers, which is dishearten..."

I used to work all hours marking and preparing stuff for school. I never had time for reading or writing, stuff for myself. Now I work for maybe an hour in the evening and after that I put everything to do with school aside and the rest of the day is my own. It's the only way!


message 35: by Amalie (last edited Mar 17, 2011 08:58AM) (new)

Amalie  | 129 comments Jaime wrote: "It bothers me to no end that there are teachers who don't want to be there anymore and who should probably have been out a few years ago when there are teachers out of work ..."

Jaime, you sound like a really good teacher, I'm sure your students really love you. I agree, I know teacher who don't know the first thing about what being a teacher really is, sadly the ones I'm talking about are senior teachers. Then sometimes I get teachers who kind a mock me because I'm still in my twenties and they think I'm being bit of idealistic. I disagree, and so will my students.

I too, have my students calling me to get advice and so and so. This job simply doesn't end when we leave the school, does it? Just few minutes ago I got calls from two of my former students telling me their Ordinary Level results. They've scored A's and such news always overwhelms me!


message 36: by Marialyce (new)

Marialyce Although I have left the profession a few years ago, I always felt that my colleagues and I, no matter how old we were, enjoyed the job. We worked especially hard to keep up with the changing times in both family values and of course technology (the computer applications, smartboards etc)

It was hard for me to find reading time at that point. There were technological lesson plans, reports, paper grading, calls to parents and taking care of my four children that didn't allow much spare time to read. So, I can understand how many teachers do not get quality reading time.

I taught middle school math and literature so I did get some wonderful YA books into my mixture of anthologies and all.


message 37: by Robin (new)

Robin (goodreadscomtriviagoddessl) I find this topic of discussion compelling because whether we are in the field of teaching in one way or another, we all have found a community of readers in this goodreads site. This is an interesting topic.


message 38: by Christina (new)

Christina (ChristinaLC) | 12 comments This is an interesting discussion. I taught junior/senior high school English 30 years ago, then I fell victim to budget cuts. I always enjoyed my students, and it was such fun to find books and poetry they could get excited about. I admire all of you who are teaching and working with young readers. I know that it is a tough job, but it is so important. Best wishes!


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