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James Mason Fun Stuff! > FIRST AUTHORIZED SHERLOCK HOLMES BOOK ANNOUNCED- YOUR REACTIONS

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message 1: by Rick (last edited Feb 06, 2011 06:08AM) (new)

Rick F. | 12762 comments Mod
This has just been announced...I know there have been many "new" Sherlock Holmes books...but this is the first "authorized" by the Conan Doyle Estate and hence has made big news- I heard it first on NPR last week. Curious what you feel about this..still working on my opinion..not sure yet!!! in all honesty..I like that there will be more Holmes..but I feel that Conan Doyle cannot be replicated, and as he tired of Holmes and even killed him off in astory- only to have to "bring him back to life" due to public clamor..I can't believe that Doyle would approve.

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Sherlock Holmes will return to the written page in a new novel authorized by the Arthur Conan Doyle estate.

Arthur Conan Doyle‘s estate has chosen English writer Anthony Horowitz to to write the new Sherlock Holmes novel.

Horowitz has already penned a number of books, including a series of books about teenage spy Alex Rider.

Horowitz said that he “fell in love with the Sherlock Holmes stories when I was sixteen, and I’ve read them many times since,” according to the MSNBC.com.

“I simply couldn’t resist this opportunity to write a brand new adventure for this iconic figure and my aim is to produce a first rate mystery for a modern audience while remaining absolutely true to the spirit of the original,” he added.

However, no details of the new tale or even its title have been revealed yet.

The New Sherlock Holmes Novel is set to be published by Orion in September 2011.

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NY TIMES OPINION PIECE

Editorial
The Authorized Sleuth
Published: January 27, 2011
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CloseLinkedinDiggMixxMySpaceYahoo! BuzzPermalink At a mid-January meeting of the Sherlock Holmes Society in London — held in the Members’ Dining Room at the House of Commons, no less — the English writer Anthony Horowitz announced that he has been commissioned by the Conan Doyle Estate to write a new novel featuring the venerable detective. According to Mr. Horowitz’s publisher, the title is a “closely guarded secret” and the prologue is “under lock and key.”

Related
Times Topic: Arthur Conan DoyleWe find this curious. The Conan Doyle Estate has gone through several owners before being sold back to a company of Doyle heirs, but copyright in the Holmes stories has nearly come to an end. (In Britain, all of Sir Arthur Conan Doyle’s Holmes books are in the public domain. In the United States, only the last — and least important — volume, “The Casebook of Sherlock Holmes,” is still under copyright.) And any writer can write a new story featuring the characters of Sherlock Holmes and Dr. Watson.

The Conan Doyle Estate describes itself as the “only company associated with the family” and offers “a unique seal of approval” bearing the profiles of Holmes and Watson. But there is no reason why an “official” 21st-century Holmes story will be any better or more authentic — whatever that means in this case — than an “unofficial” one.

Mr. Horowitz is a well-regarded TV writer and author of the Alex Rider series of children’s books. His Holmes will surely be recognizably Holmes, and Mr. Horowitz may well write a ripping yarn. We certainly hope so. We’re glad, nonetheless, that literary estates of this kind — corporate extensions of a familial association, with a seal of approval — don’t antedate the 20th century. We shudder to think what the Shakespeare Estate might be endorsing now.

A version of this editorial appeared in print on January 28, 2011, on page A30 of the New York edition.


Jane | 262 comments I've tried to read many of the "Sherlock Holmes" books that have come out over the years. I have not always been thrilled but, every once in a while, there has been a little gem. Michael Chabron wrote a thin volume including Sherlock in the story which I liked very much. But I look forward with extreme interest to this one.


Jeff Horton | 110 comments I think it sounds rather interesting. For me, it is more important that the author stays true to Holmes "character" than he does even the time period, though I would prefer the historical setting on Baker Street.


Rick F. | 12762 comments Mod
Jeff wrote: "I think it sounds rather interesting. For me, it is more important that the author stays true to Holmes "character" than he does even the time period, though I would prefer the historical setting o..."

I do look forward to it- with a natural cynic's trepidation :>)


Jenny I enjoyed his YA Alex Rider series, should be interesting to see what he does with Holmes. I'm no purist, by any stretch of the imagination; I adore Laurie King's series and am quite fond of the new Sherlock series on Mastercheese Theatre. :)


Rick F. | 12762 comments Mod
Jenny wrote: "I enjoyed his YA Alex Rider series, should be interesting to see what he does with Holmes. I'm no purist, by any stretch of the imagination; I adore Laurie King's series and am quite fond of the n..."

I have a Laurie King book- have not read it yet- does that include Mycroft Holmes?


Tracy I'm actually really excited. The new Sherlock series (the BBC modern-day production) restarted my old resolution to read the canon in order, and I'm up to The Return of Sherlock Holmes. I'm planning to be done by at least the summer, in time to read the new novel when it comes out.

It's actually a very good thing that it's coming out now, because Arthur Conan Doyle's home is in danger of being destroyed. They're hoping to use this to gain more publicity for the movement to save his house! (http://saveundershaw.com is their website; I highly recommend that everyone here who has Facebook go and Like the "The Undershaw Preservation Trust" page on there!)


Rick F. | 12762 comments Mod
Tracy wrote: "I'm actually really excited. The new Sherlock series (the BBC modern-day production) restarted my old resolution to read the canon in order, and I'm up to The Return of Sherlock Holmes. I'm plannin..."

I must admit that I thought that this would meet with some trepidation- but now I am catching the excitement emitted by Group members!


Andrea (andreakhost) I really enjoy the Laurie R King Holmes books - Mycroft does appear in them, but only later on in the series. They are as much about the narrator, Mary, as they are about Holmes.

An "official" Holmes book is no more or less interesting than any other Holmes book. It will all in the end come down to the story.


MissSusie | 243 comments Rick wrote:I do look forward to it- with a natural cynic's trepidation :>)

I agree with you there.
However I did enjoy the new Sherlock Holmes better than I thought I would and I am currently reading The Sherlockian the only ones I haven't tried yet are the Laurie King novels I hope to rememdy that soon!


message 11: by Rick (last edited Mar 28, 2011 06:52PM) (new)

Rick F. | 12762 comments Mod
Susie wrote: "Rick wrote:I do look forward to it- with a natural cynic's trepidation :>)

I agree with you there.
However I did enjoy the new Sherlock Holmes better than I thought I would and I am currently..."


I sent an invite to Ms. King..who accepted my friend request- I do hope she becomes a James Masoner- as her input would be most interesting


Jan C (woeisme) | 1018 comments Rick wrote: "Susie wrote: "Rick wrote:I do look forward to it- with a natural cynic's trepidation :>)

I agree with you there.
However I did enjoy the new Sherlock Holmes better than I thought I would and ..."


Her assistant handles her account. There is a fair amount of blogging done. I used to have her as a friend but I got tired of her blogging.


Rick F. | 12762 comments Mod
Jan C wrote: "Rick wrote: "Susie wrote: "Rick wrote:I do look forward to it- with a natural cynic's trepidation :>)

I agree with you there.
However I did enjoy the new Sherlock Holmes better than I thought I ..."


Ahh! ok- well - no loss there


Monica Happy Reading All!! (nutz4reading) | 17 comments Okay, I have to admit that I have not read Sherlock Holmes. I believe I have one book about Sherlock. I know I had started reading it but I just wasn't in the mood for him at the time and have not picked it up again. If I can find it maybe I will try reading it again.


Rick F. | 12762 comments Mod
Monica wrote: "Okay, I have to admit that I have not read Sherlock Holmes. I believe I have one book about Sherlock. I know I had started reading it but I just wasn't in the mood for him at the time and have no..."

well worth it! there is also many of his stories for free- to be downloaded


Ellie (EllieArcher) I love all things Sherlock-even not-very-good Sherlock. And I loved the Laurie King novels. I could use a good re-read of the originals. It's hard to believe my copies are 40 years+ old :O
I'm excited about the new Holmes although being approved of by "the estate" doesn't tell me much. I mean, I don't even know if "the estate" would have approved the original!


message 17: by Jenny (last edited Feb 09, 2011 03:33PM) (new)

Jenny Rick wrote: "Jenny wrote: "I enjoyed his YA Alex Rider series, should be interesting to see what he does with Holmes. I'm no purist, by any stretch of the imagination; I adore Laurie King's series and am quite..."

As a minor character, but very little. The stories focus on Sherlock and Mary Russell, the narrator.
Rick, please start with The Beekeeper's Apprentice - it's the first in the series. This is one series where, even though the books are written as standalones, too, you are so much better off reading them in order.


Rick F. | 12762 comments Mod
Jenny wrote: "Rick wrote: "Jenny wrote: "I enjoyed his YA Alex Rider series, should be interesting to see what he does with Holmes. I'm no purist, by any stretch of the imagination; I adore Laurie King's series..."

Appreciate it Jenny! I do have that book too!


Tracy Monica wrote: "Okay, I have to admit that I have not read Sherlock Holmes. I believe I have one book about Sherlock. I know I had started reading it but I just wasn't in the mood for him at the time and have no..."

I was that way, too! I read A Study in Scarlet and part of The Sign of Four a few years ago, and enjoyed them, but couldn't say I loved them. Now that I've come back to them a few years later, though, I'm completely absorbed and really enjoying them. Sometimes I think it's like you said--you have to be in the mood!

You might enjoy the new BBC adaptation, even if you don't read Sherlock, per se. It's set in the modern day and does take elements from the stories, but non-Sherlock fans have reported enjoying it as well, I think. It's really very well-done and the way they interpret the characters is so interesting.


message 20: by Barbara (last edited Feb 09, 2011 09:20PM) (new)

Barbara (Cinnabar) | 891 comments I'm interested to see if Horowitz is really able to "remain absolutely true to the spirit of the original." If he can, more power to him. I would welcome additional "authentic" Sherlock Holmes stories.


Ellie (EllieArcher) Diana wrote: "I don't know I kind of see it as trying to fix something that isn't broken. It usually annoys me when new authors try to add more to classic stories and characters; but if it's actually authorized ..."

Hi Diana-I'm not sure I trust the estate but I understand your reactions. For me, although I usually react as you do (resenting others trying to horn in on a successful series), it's kind of like "Fan Fiction" (the site where people add on stories to their favorite tv show/movie/etc.). I so love Holmes that I feel driven to get more of him.


Jenny Diana wrote: "I don't know I kind of see it as trying to fix something that isn't broken. It usually annoys me when new authors try to add more to classic stories and characters; but if it's actually authorized ..."

I can see that point of view; however, in this case where the creator/author is long gone, and the public has such a positive response to the character so many years later and creates a demand for it, I can understand how the estate would seek someone they felt would keep the character consistent in order to satisfy the public with more stories. But again, I'm not a purist. I just don't see it as a case of attempting to "fix" something, more like trying to fill a demand for more when the source is long gone. :)


Ellie (EllieArcher) Oh, for me it's not a question of "fixing" anything-more about giving me a new "fix" of Holmes! LOL


Melissa | 52 comments I love Sherlock Holmes. I thought that I would hate the new updated BBC Sherlock, but as it turned out, I love it and can't wait for more episodes. So I will keep an open mind about the new Sherlock book. I read the first two Laurie King books, and I liked them, but I wasn't thrilled.


message 25: by [deleted user] (new)

I think that is wonderful. And the fact that they chose him is a good sign. Now, just a little off the subject, how does everyone feel about Laurie King? I happen to love her books with Holmes' wife. Any thoughts?


message 26: by [deleted user] (new)

I am a fan of hers and I will ask again then. Her writing is delightful. I hope you enjoy it when you get to it. I read four of the novels but then took a break.


Jenny Sonia wrote: "I think that is wonderful. And the fact that they chose him is a good sign. Now, just a little off the subject, how does everyone feel about Laurie King? I happen to love her books with Holmes' wif..."

I have purchased and have read every book in her Mary Russell series since I became hooked with Beekeeper's Apprentice - I think it's a wonderful series. I was at a book signing for her last one, and was delighted to find that in person she is just as sharp, witty and smart in person as she appears via her writing.


message 28: by [deleted user] (new)

Thank you Jenny, I like her too. I read the Beekeeper's Apprentice last. Even by chance. Love that series. I am glad other people like it too. I am a fan of hers.


Ellie (EllieArcher) I also love that series-a nice, off-beat take on the usual Holmes offshoots. And when I was a teen I was always writing mental fan fiction in which I somehow met/became involved with Sherlock Holmes so this book both fit right in my mental framework & took me back to being 14.
King is also a good writer. I've read her other series as well.
Rick: I, too,(as a fan) invited her to join us but she ignored my invite as well. At least I'm not alone :)


MissSusie | 243 comments I am about halfway done with The Sherlockian and highly recommned it to Holmes fans it is a current story of a murder of a Sherlockian (avid fans of Holmes) and a historical story of Conan Doyle after he killed off Holmes about how much he hated Holmes and the backlash he got from fans. He also decides to help solve a crime and picks his friend Bram Stoker to be his Watson!


Ike Rose | 14 comments And just when you thought it was safe to get back in the Holmes water...

This past winter there was a Call for Submissions for an anthology:

"The Erotic Adventures of Sherlock Holmes" - due out this year - I forget the publisher. The Call actually said that ANY character from the Holmes Canon was fair game - even minor ones.

I had an idea, but was busy editing "My Valentine Prince" for "My Sexy Valentine" - my editor wanted all 20,000 words from first person to third person.

The first draft of THAT ended up a 27,000 words - with a totally different ending.

OY!


Rick F. | 12762 comments Mod
Ike wrote: "And just when you thought it was safe to get back in the Holmes water...

This past winter there was a Call for Submissions for an anthology:

"The Erotic Adventures of Sherlock Holmes" - due out t..."


haha to complete your ending "VEY"


Ellie (EllieArcher) Oi!


Sharon (fiona64) | 441 comments I'm a big Holmes fan. I've read some of the "unauthorized" works, and I liked the ones that kept close to Doyle's writing style. I'll keep an open mind on this one.


Sharon (fiona64) | 441 comments Melissa wrote: "I love Sherlock Holmes. I thought that I would hate the new updated BBC Sherlock, but as it turned out, I love it and can't wait for more episodes. So I will keep an open mind about the new Sherloc..."

I remain ... unconvinced ... with the new Sherlock. I think it's because the late Jeremy Brett was so wonderful in the Granada Television series that I cannot get past his memory.


Rick F. | 12762 comments Mod
Sharon wrote: "Melissa wrote: "I love Sherlock Holmes. I thought that I would hate the new updated BBC Sherlock, but as it turned out, I love it and can't wait for more episodes. So I will keep an open mind about..."

Brett was brilliant- his early death has left quite a void


Arthur Gibson | 14 comments It will all come down to how they do it. Whenever you "modernize" you take the character out of the moral and social framework in which they operated. Invariably this alters the character. With something as iconic as Holmes this can be a really bad thing. But I will keep an open mind until I read it.


Mark Johansen | 40 comments I tend to be disappointed by efforts to "revive" or "adapt" a dead author's character.

If a character is famous, that pretty much means that the original author was a great writer. If the author doing the reviving is not that great a writer, then the new version will, by definition, not be as good as the original, and will be disappointing. As great writers are rare, the probability that the reviver will be as good as the original writer is small.

On top of that, people reviving a character tend to find a need to put some new spin on the character. Sometimes this is interesting, but often I just find it annoying. I often walk away feeling like you've dishonored the memory of a dead friend or something like that.

To shift suddenly from books to television for an example, I absolutely hated the Tom Cruise remake of Mission Impossible. For starters, what made the original series interesting was that they always had incredibly elaborate plots and ingenious gadgets. In the Tom Cruise movie, they had a miniature TV camera and someone breaking into a building by lowering himself from the ceiling. Oh. My. How. Clever. No way did it live up to the imagination of the original.

And then they turned the heroes of the original into villains! In the original the IMF team was a group of patriots fighting tyranny. They were the kind of heroes I respect in real life: They didn't go around talking big; they had a job to do and they did it. Then the remake turns them into a bunch of whining, corrupt jerks. Maybe the writers were trying to make some kind of political point. If so, I didn't get it, and in any case I'm not interested. I thought it was just rude: smashing someone else's characters.


Jotale (Aiustis) | 57 comments I won't read it. Excluding Star Trek books (and a few others), I don't read books that are continuations of other authors' characters and stories.


Evelyn Puerto (EvelynPuerto) | 32 comments Arthur wrote: It will all come down to how they do it. Whenever you "modernize" you take the character out of the moral and social framework in which they operated. Invariably this alters the character. With something as iconic as Holmes this can be a really bad thing.

I totally agree. I read all the original Sherlock Holmes years ago, and can't see how they can be added to. I agree with Rick...AC Doyle tried to kill off Holmes; he would not approve of this.


William (DarthIndurate) | 19 comments I only read Hound of the Baskervilles a few months ago, but loved it for its great story and its haunting setting on the English moors. I can't see how this iconic character can be brought back some hundred years later and be as successful or as engaging. Here's hoping Horowitz does well, but I'll forgive him if he isn't Conan Doyle...maybe.


Barbara (Cinnabar) | 891 comments I've read some Sherlock Holmes stories by contemporary authors and they could never capture Conan Doyle's "voice." Something was just missing. I hope Horowitz does better.


Rick F. | 12762 comments Mod
Barbara wrote: "I've read some Sherlock Holmes stories by contemporary authors and they could never capture Conan Doyle's "voice." Something was just missing. I hope Horowitz does better."

I thinkit has todo with the fact that Conan Doyle actually lived during the period the stories took place- so even his tiny details, were simple observations for him


Robin (goodreadscomtriviagoddessl) I have never read Sherlock Holmes, either. I tried watching a movie with Michael Caine and Ben Kingsley but I think they were just spoofing Sherlock. I have tried to watch the older series of Sherlock. Any recommendations, Rick?


Rick F. | 12762 comments Mod
Robin wrote: "I have never read Sherlock Holmes, either. I tried watching a movie with Michael Caine and Ben Kingsley but I think they were just spoofing Sherlock. I have tried to watch the older series of Sher..."

I really love the Basil Rathbone/Nigel Bruce films-tho Bruce played Watson as quite blustery- I love his acting style- so biased! also- talk about biased!! Our Group's Inspiration James Mason played Watson to Chris Plummer's Holmes in Murder by Decree- an excellant film- Mason was far more accurate in his portrayal- and in Plummer's recent memoir, in addition to singing the praises of James Mason, Plummer wrote that they so enjoyed working with each other, a sequel was planned- canceled due to Mr. Mason's death


Carol (peppersgirl) I'm always annoyed when books are published in a series by an author who is dead. No one can be Sir Arthur Conan Doyle and no one would know what he would think of the new book. Sherlock Holmes is his baby and I don't think anyone else can write a sequel to his series. I felt the same way when they published a new sequel to Winnie the Pooh. It makes me so made. I know these are beloved series and people want to continue the story but I think it takes away from the brilliance of the authors. The authors live on through their books, it takes away from their legacy when just anyone can write a sequel to their masterpiece.


Kernos | 61 comments The Basil Rathbone/Nigel Bruce movies are a lot of fun, if a bit campy from todays POV. I watch them every few years. I think my favorite production is the BBC series with Jeremy Brett. But there is nothing quite as good as reading the stories.


Jon Souza (mynameisdavidcole) | 6 comments partial to Rathbone myself but the new series from the BBC I think is a great modern update on the characters.


Gini | 240 comments Sharon wrote: "I remain ... unconvinced ... with the new Sherlock. I think it's because the late Jeremy Brett was so wonderful in the Granada Television series that I cannot get past his memory. "

Jeremy Brett was, and always will be, Holmes to me. His intensity and physicality capture Holmes like no one else can even hope to attain.

That being said, the new adaptation is an interesting look at Holmes, though the writers, in trying to invent new versions of the Holmes story, have left me appalled at the clues I was seeing that Holmes was overlooking. Still, I like the portrayal of the characters of Holmes and Watson.

The nice thing about Holmes, just like about Elizabeth Bennet and Mr. Darcy, is that the many adaptations and permutations can do nothing to sully the sterling character and delight of the originals!


Gini | 240 comments Robin wrote: "I have never read Sherlock Holmes, either. I tried watching a movie with Michael Caine and Ben Kingsley but I think they were just spoofing Sherlock. I have tried to watch the older series of Sher..."

The BBC/Grenada series with Jeremy Brett as Holmes is the way to go. 3 "seasons," very true to the stories, and I believe streaming on Netflix.


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Books mentioned in this topic

The Sherlockian (other topics)
The Beekeeper's Apprentice (other topics)
The Further Adventures of Sherlock Holmes: War of the Worlds (other topics)
The War of the Worlds (other topics)
The Beekeeper's Apprentice (other topics)
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Laurie R. King (other topics)