Bf2S discussion

15 views
Open Chat

Comments (showing 1-10 of 10) (10 new)    post a comment »
dateDown arrow    newest »

message 1: by Kmarion (last edited Jan 18, 2011 11:53PM) (new)

Kmarion | 14 comments Mod
I expect all of you to get this and begin "ripping".
http://news.cnet.com/8301-31001_3-200...


message 2: by Kmarion (new)

Kmarion | 14 comments Mod
it doesnt say :/


message 3: by Charlie (new)

Charlie | 4 comments I have to say that Catch 22 is slow going. Can't get into it. Only 80 pages in. Anyone else read it? Any opinions on it?

/don't give away any of the story!


message 4: by Kmarion (new)

Kmarion | 14 comments Mod
I haven't. .. and your not making a good sell to me :)


message 5: by aaron (new)

aaron (aaroninky) Catch 22 is a fantastic book... slow going? Not sure I ever had that problem myself.


message 6: by Jay (new)

Jay | 3 comments Charlie wrote: "I have to say that Catch 22 is slow going. Can't get into it. Only 80 pages in. Anyone else read it? Any opinions on it?

/don't give away any of the story!"


One of my favorite books of all time! :)


message 7: by Jens (new)

Jens | 3 comments Hey guys. I'm not at all well-read by any means (wasn't really brought up in a well-read household), but I've been enjoying books recently and am looking through Amazon for an order for the summer. Apart from you know, the Dan Browns, the John Grishams and their Norwegian equivalents, I've read 1984, Animal Farm, Brave New World, Farenheit 451, Great Gatsby.. And that's about it. I really enjoyed all of them though, and I guess I want to catch up on, y'know, the 'classics' that I've missed in my life.

I know I should be choosing books based on taste, rather than 'what is meant to be good', but I don't feel like I've acquired one yet, if you know what I mean.

Anyway, I really enjoyed Gatsby, especially the way it was written, so I thought I'd order 'Tender is the Night' and 'The Beautiful and the Damned' as well. Also on my list are 'The Grapes of Wrath' (Steinbeck), 'Octopussy and The Living Daylights' (Flemming), 'Northanger Abbey' (Austen) and 'To Kill A Mockingbird' (Harper Lee).

These are based highly on what seems to be regarded as 'good books' and can be completely misled. I realise Northanger Abbey isn't Austen's most famous, but a friend of mine couldn't stop laughing while reading it so I thought I'd give it a try (and it's only £1 on Amazon).

So basically, any recommendations would be great. Some short stories would be nice, too. Much love.


message 8: by aaron (last edited May 15, 2011 08:17AM) (new)

aaron (aaroninky) Jens wrote: "Hey guys. I'm not at all well-read by any means (wasn't really brought up in a well-read household), but I've been enjoying books recently and am looking through Amazon for an order for the summer...."

Some sort of 'taste' is really required if you're going to start chipping away at that formidable (and rather ambiguous) group of books designated as 'classics'. Try and think of particular genres you enjoy (a good question is do you enjoy 'literary fiction', books that are written as artistic statements of writing-in themselves, or 'genre fiction', books written to a generic model, e.g. crime fiction); try and think of particular periods (even narrowing it down to a century will help greatly); try and think, perhaps, why you enjoyed certain books more than others beyond the merely stylistic or narrative level (i.e. considering thematics).

Any recommendation would really be a vague shot in the dark without at least some narrowing down. Going from Orwell to Steinbeck to Austen is a fun bit of discovery but there's really no continuity or connection at all; the 'classics' are still just an abstract category that you're reading 'for the sake of reading', rather than for taste or enjoyment (though you may, of course, incidentally just enjoy some of the titles you are prescribed by the canon). Be self-conscious when you read 'classic' literature and constantly question yourself why you're enjoying it (if it all) and why you were provoked to read it in the first place: in being 'well read' it is more important to be a critically engaged reader than to have simply read the clichéd top-100.

Though if I'm really pushed to recommend some titles, I would honestly start right at the beginning of the Western canon and would encourage a 'reading through' of titles that pique your interest. That is really the best way to gain an understanding and proper comprehension of literature both as an art 'form' and as a form of historical expression. Read your Homer and your Virgil and your Ovid and your Cervantes Saavedra, Miguel de and your John Milton and your Dante Alighieri and your William Shakespeare and so on. I am not exaggerating or over-estimating their importance - you will really enjoy everything that has followed much better (i.e. the allusion and allegory, the inspiration and influence, the ironising and subversion) if you are versed in the 'proper classics', per se.


message 9: by Jens (new)

Jens | 3 comments Aaron wrote: "Jens wrote: "Hey guys. I'm not at all well-read by any means (wasn't really brought up in a well-read household), but I've been enjoying books recently and am looking through Amazon for an order fo..."

Traditionally I've always liked books with some sort of action/thriller type theme, or at least books with some sort of suspense (I realise most books have this, but yeah, I'm not a fan of solely reading fantastic descriptions of nature and humanity, if you know what I mean).. So that would probably be a better path to start on than 'literary fiction'. Of literary periods I've tended to enjoy realism and modernism more-so than romanticism and other (older) periods (I'm probably using these terms wrongly, apologies in advance). We did a lot of Ibsen in school which I enjoyed (because of the themes, rather than the style) - I guess it's the whole "taking a stand against society" thing that attracted me. I realise that's kind of vague, but at least it's something.

Regarding "Read your Homer and your Virgil and your Ovid and your Cervantes Saavedra, Miguel de and your John Milton and your Dante Alighieri and your William Shakespeare", I've always been intimidated by those kind of guys - like, I'm not sure I'd *get* them - looking at excerpts from Shakespeare, I struggle to cope with the language (Probably due to English not being my mother tongue). I feel like I'd struggle to understand them thematically as well, being as far away from my 'time' as they are. But maybe I'm wrong and they're just more accessible than I think?

I'm not sure this adds anything, but I might as well: I really enjoy reading about the author's background, the circumstances it was written in, the purpose of it, etc. I don't know, I guess I enjoy books that have some sort of purpose or message or opinion to put across, and I don't mind reading about this opinion/purpose before reading the book - I know some say this is bad ("You should make up your own mind first"), but it really makes me enjoy them more. Meh, this paragraph might sound kind of pretentious in the "Pah! I only like books that matter" kind of way, but it's not meant to.

Anyways, I hope this helps somewhat. Thanks.


message 10: by aaron (new)

aaron (aaroninky) I know I'm really handsome and all, but if you guys would like a different group picture (not that I selected myself in the first place - it was Kmar with the discerning good taste) then let me know!


back to top

unread topics | mark unread


Authors mentioned in this topic

John Milton (other topics)
Virgil (other topics)
Miguel de Cervantes Saavedra (other topics)
Ovid (other topics)
William Shakespeare (other topics)
More...