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message 66: by Madrano (last edited May 01, 2011 05:59AM) (new)

Madrano (madran) | 3157 comments Alias, thank you for sharing the review. It sounded unappetizing until the mention of Winesburg, Ohio by Sherwood Anderson, which i really liked. So, i continued reading. Although it sounds alright, it's not going on my list. I liked one paragraph from the review--

"This novel reminds us what a remarkable observer Wallace was — a first-class “noticer,” to use a Saul Bellow term, of the muchness of the world around him, chronicling the overwhelming data and demands that we are pelted with, second by second, minute by minute, and the protean, overstuffed landscape we dwell in."

This is an aspect i think i would like, being a bit of a "noticer" myself.

Thanks for clarifying your post, Chris. It was the "A Scaffold of One’s Own" part i didn't understand, thinking it was a subtitle or something to the Wallace book. Amazon helped out with that.

deb


Alias Reader (AliasReader) | 8456 comments It was reviewed in the NY Times Book Review a few weeks ago.

http://www.nytimes.com/2011/04/01/boo...


JoAnn/QuAppelle | 712 comments Madrano wrote: "Chris, did you read this book? It sounds as though it might be uneasy reading.

The Pale KingDavid Foster Wallace

deb"


Sounds dreadful to me!


Madrano (madran) | 3157 comments Chris, did you read this book? It sounds as though it might be uneasy reading.

The Pale KingDavid Foster Wallace

deb


Kathy  (readr4ever) | 14 comments Kudos to all who make the group run so smoothly!


Alias Reader (AliasReader) | 8456 comments Kathy wrote: "Alias Reader wrote: "Thanks for sharing, Kathy. And I'm glad you came back. :)"

You run a great group here, Alias. Glad to be back."

---------------

Thank you, Kathy. I just do the clerical stuff here. We are a group that used to be on AOL. Many here have been with the group longer than I. We sort of run things here by committee. :)


Kathy  (readr4ever) | 14 comments Madrano wrote: "Welcome back, Kathy. You had a good reading year! I hope the same will be true this year.

deb"


Thanks. So far, this year is shaping up to be a good one, too. It seems every year I discover at least new authors that I love. Last year, several were S.J. Bolton, Jamie Ford, Alan Brennert, and Stephanie Kallos. This year, so far, it is Kate Morton.


Madrano (madran) | 3157 comments Welcome back, Kathy. You had a good reading year! I hope the same will be true this year.

deb


Kathy  (readr4ever) | 14 comments Mike wrote: "Alias Reader wrote: "Mike wrote: "The only book I read in 2010 that was actually published in the same was Greyhound by Steffan Piper. Not great writing but the stor..."

Interesting. Thanks for the info, Mike.


Kathy  (readr4ever) | 14 comments Alias Reader wrote: "Thanks for sharing, Kathy. And I'm glad you came back. :)"

You run a great group here, Alias. Glad to be back.


Alias Reader (AliasReader) | 8456 comments Thanks for sharing, Kathy. And I'm glad you came back. :)


Kathy  (readr4ever) | 14 comments Just got back to this group (shame on me for not doing that sooner) and wanted to add my favorites for 2010.

Favorite Reads for 2010

1. All Clear by Connie Willis
2. Broken for You by Stephanie Kallos
3. The Swan Thieves by Elizabeth Kostova
4. The Help by Kathryn Stockett
5. Four Spirits: A Novel by Sena Jeter Naslund
6. If I Stay by Gayle Forman
7. Hotel on the Corner of Bitter and Sweet by Jamie Ford
8. The Weed That Strings the Hangman's Bag by Alan Bradley
9. A Murderous Procession by Ariana Franklin
10.The Wife's Tale: A Novel by Lori Lansens
11.The Hand That First Held Mine by Maggie O'Farrell
12.The God of the Hive by Laurie R. King
13. The Girl Who Kicked the Hornet's Nest by Stieg Larsson
14.Ice Cold by Tess Gerritsen
15.Every Last One by Anna Quindlen
16.Sacrifice by S.J. Bolton
17.Moloka'i by Alan Brennert
18.Linger by Maggie Stiefvater
19.Mockingjay by Suzanne Collins
20.Sarah's Key by Tatiana de Rosnay
21.Dark Road to Darjeeling by Deanna Raybourn
22.Adam & Eve: A Novel by Sena Jeter Naslund
23.Extraordinary by Nancy Werlin
24.The Sherlockian by Graham Moore


Madrano (madran) | 3157 comments Mike wrote: "You have to have a Kindle account of course and have to tell the loaner a email addy. Incidentally, I found groups that loan books back and forth on the Amazon forum pages and on here a little bit. They have dedicated topics for it. ..."

This is a generous feature, it seems to me. I wonder if it will last once there are more Kindles sold. That's just me, always questioning the freebies. ;-)

deb


Mike (mikesgoodreads) | 294 comments Alias Reader wrote: "Mike wrote: "The only book I read in 2010 that was actually published in the same was Greyhound by Steffan Piper. Not great writing but the story makes up for it. Or..."

If anyone reading this post who has an eReader wants to read the above it's one of the ones you can loan on Kindle. I have others too, some can't be loaned and some can, it's the publishers choice. You have to have a Kindle account of course and have to tell the loaner a email addy. Incidentally, I found groups that loan books back and forth on the Amazon forum pages and on here a little bit. They have dedicated topics for it. If anyone is interested in this let me know, you could private message me if your a lurker here.

I'll post this in the eBook topic as well. Just thought of it here as I've loaned the above twice already.


JoAnn/QuAppelle | 712 comments My SIL was very lucky.... and believe me, we realized it! Everything went as scheduled for him during his 8 years after the Naval Academy. He knew that if he came in first in his flight school class, he would be able to choose his next assignment. So he did --- and his "sea duty" for the following three years was spent in Oklahoma at an Air Force base. He flew for three weeks and was then home for three weeks. A good way to start a marriage rather than being away for 6 months at a time. His high ratings and awards during those three years allowed him to choose his next assignment near Baltimore. He stayed on there after leaving the Navy.....


Carolyn (in SC) C234D | 95 comments JoAnn/QuAppelle wrote: "Carolyn (in SC) C234D wrote: "JSIL will be attending a naval school there for the next 18 months, so it will be a long time before we see them again.
.."

Do you think you will go out there to visi..."


Yes, we'll probably get out there once to Monterey. After he finishes at school, they aren't sure where they will go. Possibly Germany, but it's too soon to tell. Plus, in the military things have a tendency to change from what you expect, as I imagine you know.


JoAnn/QuAppelle | 712 comments Carolyn (in SC) C234D wrote: "JSIL will be attending a naval school there for the next 18 months, so it will be a long time before we see them again.
.."


Do you think you will go out there to visit? What a beautiful place to live! Do they know where they will go after he is done?

Two of my daughter's best friends just moved east from CA. Both military--- one Navy, one Marine. She is so glad to have them nearby again.


Carolyn (in SC) C234D | 95 comments JoAnn/QuAppelle wrote: "Carolyn (in SC) C234D wrote: "we had our daughter and two young grandchildren living with us for almost six months. Too many distractions! But I miss them now...."

boo hoo, I bet you do.....after ..."


They are across the country in Monterey, California. SIL will be attending a naval school there for the next 18 months, so it will be a long time before we see them again.

I had never been interested in reading THE ALCHEMIST until my book group selected it. It's not my usual type of book, but I did enjoy it.


RNOCEAN | 29 comments TOP 10 FICTION: (no particular order)

The Forgotten Garden - Kate Morton

Saving Cee Cee Honeycutt - Beth Hoffman

The Help - Kathryn Stockett

The Wife's Tale - Lori Lansen

The Girl With Glass Feet - Ali Shaw

The Particular Sadness of Lemon Cake - Aimee Bender

Leaving The World - Douglas Kennedy

The Girl With The Dragon Tattoo - Stieg Larsson

The Girl Who Played With Fire - Stieg Larsson

The Hunger Games - Suzanne Collins


JoAnn/QuAppelle | 712 comments Connie, I am glad to know someone who can decide in 20 pages whether a book grabs her!

As for me, I read the synopsis of The Alchemist and decided it was not for me. Zzzzzzz


Connie (Constants) | 74 comments Susan wrote: "I know that a lot of people love The Alchemist but that one just didn't work for me. I didn't like the style and it bored me. I ended up skimming through it."

Both my boss and my son had been urging me to read The Alchemist so I brought a copy home. I struggled through the first 20 pages before quitting. It's just not my kind of read. I didn't like the writing style either, and I suspect I wouldn't have appreciated the book's message either.


Susan (Nutz4Books) | 236 comments I know that a lot of people love The Alchemist but that one just didn't work for me. I didn't like the style and it bored me. I ended up skimming through it.


Elaine Langer | 125 comments Carolyn (in SC) C234D wrote: "These are my top ten favorite fiction books for 2010 (as posted in the Readers and Reading thread):

Cutting for Stone, by Abraham Verghese
The Alchemist, by Paolo Coelho
Transfer of Power, b..."


I love yor list. I am rereading the Great Gatsby right now (14 years later). I felt the same with Mjor Pettigrew, when it ended I thought, is that it?

I have cutting for stone and the alchemist on my to read list. Thanks! for sharing.


JoAnn/QuAppelle | 712 comments Carolyn (in SC) C234D wrote: "we had our daughter and two young grandchildren living with us for almost six months. Too many distractions! But I miss them now...."

boo hoo, I bet you do.....after getting used to them being around all the time!!

How far away are they now, Carolyn?


Carolyn (in SC) C234D | 95 comments Alias Reader wrote: "You had a nice mix of classical and contemporary, Carolyn."

Yes, I read some good classics last year, but I was surprised to see how little non-fiction I had read. I will consciously try to remedy that in 2011. I usually have a longer NF list, but this wasn't a typical year for me, as we had our daughter and two young grandchildren living with us for almost six months. Too many distractions! But I miss them now.


Alias Reader (AliasReader) | 8456 comments You had a nice mix of classical and contemporary, Carolyn.


Carolyn (in SC) C234D | 95 comments These are my top ten favorite fiction books for 2010 (as posted in the Readers and Reading thread):

Cutting for Stone, by Abraham Verghese
The Alchemist, by Paolo Coelho
Transfer of Power, by Vince Flynn
The Second Perimeter, by Mike Lawson
The Great Gatsby, by F. Scott Fitzgerald
The God of War, by Marisa Silver
The Girl with the Dragon Tattoo, by Steig Larsson
Wuthering Heights, by Emily Bronte
Birds of a Feather, by Jacqueline Winspear
The Third Option, by Vince Flynn

Some of the other fiction that I thought highly of:

The Sweetness at the Bottom of the Pie by Alan Bradley (I look forward to the next book, should check to see if it has been published yet)

The Haunted Bookshop by Christopher Morley -- an oldie, but a goodie.

Major Pettigrew's Last Stand by Helen Simonson -- I enjoyed it, just expected more, I guess.

Bookseller of Kabul by Asne Seierstad -- interesting and very topical still.

City of Bones by Michael Connelly -- A Harry Bosch police novel; I find this author's books riveting.

I am happy to have been introduced to two new mystery/thriller writers this year -- Mike Lawson and Vince Flynn. I have quite a few of their books to look forward to.


Madrano (madran) | 3157 comments Good point...thanks, Sherry. I think i just like round numbers. ;-)

deb


Sherry (sethurner) (sthurner) Also, remember that you don't have to come up with ten titles. This thread is just fiction titles you enjoyed reading in 2010. Any number is just fine.


Madrano (madran) | 3157 comments Alias Reader wrote: "For this thread, the book doesn't have to be published in 2010, just a book read by you in 2010...."

I may have caused this confusion with my comments. If so, apologies. Btw, i forgot to mention liking
Noah's Compass by Anne Tyler. I liked it and continue to find myself sighing after reading her fiction. However, it didn't end up being a favorite for the year, even though i didn't have 10. I'm not sure i'm clear on my own thinking here. Maybe it's that if a novel is truly outstanding i feel i should remember what it is about & this is the case for the ones i listed. Whereas when thinking of Tyler's book & others i read last year, i couldn't remember what they were about or even anything about the characters.

And thanks for the comments on Yates & other books by him. I didn't know where to start.

deb


Alias Reader (AliasReader) | 8456 comments Mike wrote: "The only book I read in 2010 that was actually published in the same was Greyhound by Steffan Piper. Not great writing but the story makes up for it. Or something."
---------------------------

For this thread, the book doesn't have to be published in 2010, just a book read by you in 2010.


Marialyce I just bought Revolutionary Road at the book sale in the library.


Sarah (SarahReader) | 68 comments Connie wrote: I "discovered" Richard Yates about 10 years ago and truly enjoyed every book of his that I've read. Easter Parade is one of those rare books that I read twice

Connie, thanks for mentioning this. I enjoyed Revolutionary Road (not sure "enjoyed" is exactly the right word, but it was very well done and worth the effort). I'll try to fit in Easter Parade soon.


Mike (mikesgoodreads) | 294 comments The only book I read in 2010 that was actually published in the same was Greyhound by Steffan Piper. Not great writing but the story makes up for it. Or something.


Connie (Constants) | 74 comments Madrano wrote: "Nothing immediately came to mind when thinking about this thread. I read quite a bit of fiction this year, thanks to my stay in NYC. However, i couldn't come up with 10 favorites and, worse, most o..."

Speaking of Revolutionary Road - I "discovered" Richard Yates about 10 years ago and truly enjoyed every book of his that I've read. Easter Parade is one of those rare books that I read twice and that I still think about occasionally. His stories are never very upbeat, but they're well-written and get right to the heart of the characters.

Connie


Alias Reader (AliasReader) | 8456 comments Revolutionary Road~~Richard Yates

Madrano wrote: "When the film came out a couple of years ago, i know many people who read the book then but didn't enjoy it. It rang true to me but i could understand not liking either character, which could influ..."
---------------

If my memory is correct, I think I purchased the book after reading a recommendation from Jonathan Franzen.

As to not having "likable" characters, that doesn't bother me at all. I find unlikeable characters very interesting.

I guess I am in the Leo Tolstoy camp. "Happy families are all alike; every unhappy family is unhappy in its own way."


Susan (Nutz4Books) | 236 comments I read Push by Sapphire when I learned of it through the hype about the movie Precious. It's a very powerful little book. I saw the movie after reading the book, and thought it was well done too.


Sherry (sethurner) (sthurner) I read Push when it came out, and remember being caught up in the sheer energy of the writing.


Madrano (madran) | 3157 comments When the film came out a couple of years ago, i know many people who read the book then but didn't enjoy it. It rang true to me but i could understand not liking either character, which could influence one's opinion.

deborah


Alias Reader (AliasReader) | 8456 comments Madrano wrote:Revolutionary Road by Richard Yates. I liked the writing and felt he had keen insights to where this country was headed in the late 50s & early 60s. I hope to read more by him, as i found the characters intriguing and the writing strong.
--------------

This has been sitting on my shelf for a long time. I really should move it up in the rotation.


message 26: by Madrano (last edited Jan 10, 2011 06:50AM) (new)

Madrano (madran) | 3157 comments Nothing immediately came to mind when thinking about this thread. I read quite a bit of fiction this year, thanks to my stay in NYC. However, i couldn't come up with 10 favorites and, worse, most of these are on the list because they introduced me to the writer &/or reminded me of the author. But the book itself isn't particularly outstanding. If this is a mood thing, it's been going on for several months. Hmmm.

Favorites for 2010.
The Bondwoman's Narrative written by Hannah Crafts "discovered, researched" and edited by Henry Louis Gates Jr.. The novel itself is too Gothic for me but this is now believed to be the first novel by a black woman. Because it is written in first person and apparently offers the first authentic look at how house slaves viewed field slaves, i found it interesting.

Push by Sapphire. I liked the way the author showed readers the progress of Precious made by sharing her school writings. This novel also introduced me to Sapphire's poetry, which is raw and emotional.

Revolutionary Road by Richard Yates. I liked the writing and felt he had keen insights to where this country was headed in the late 50s & early 60s. I hope to read more by him, as i found the characters intriguing and the writing strong.

Too Loud a Solitude by Bohumil Hrabal. This is a very short novel about a man in Prague who has spent decades working as a paper crusher. The person who loaned it to me did so due to some comments we shared about crowding our homes with old books. I'd like to read more by Hrabal, as his humor fits me.

The Stranger by Albert Camus. Also this year i read his The Plague. I liked both for their presentation and the ideas behind them, leading me to want to read more by him. However, i think it's this education about his work i like as much, if not more than the novels themselves. (I'm wondering if i'm even making sense with this comment.)

Loitering with Intent by Muriel Spark Again, the book was so well written it reminded me how much i have enjoyed Spark's writing in the past. It also led me to wonder why i haven't read more, which i hope to do this year. This particular novel wasn't the best i've read by her, though. (I hope my theme/intent is being expressed well enough that i don't look crazy here.)

The Colonel's Family (Series B by Fredrika Bremer introduced me to this 19th century Swedish author. She was a feminist who influenced the Swedish legislature with her novels and also carved a good life for herself without marrying. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Fredrika...

As you may have noticed, not one of these was written in this century. I read several (Undiscovered Country: A NovelLin Enger; LowboyJohn Wray; The Guernsey Literary and Potato Peel Pie SocietyMary Ann Shaffer; Point OmegaDon DeLillo to name a few)
but they didn't seem particularly good and none of them made me want to read more by the authors.

EDIT: PS. I realized that i should add, for those new to the board (& me) that it is typical that i don't like many contemporary novels. What's surprising this year is that even the older ones haven't done much for me. The nonfiction this year was great, however. Also typical of me is that i read & enjoy nf better than fiction.

deborah


Elaine Langer | 125 comments Bobbie57 wrote: I would love to read this with you. I guess I will wait a bit before deciding...big books don't usually scare me, I like a book that lasts. :)


Carolyn (in SC) C234D | 95 comments Alias Reader wrote: "Lynne in PA/Lineepinee wrote: "I only read 22 books last year, a couple of them not worth the time. I read several books with the immigrant theme. My top reads were:
CUTTING FOR STONE/ Abraham Verg..."


Although Cutting for Stone is a long book, I found that it moved pretty quickly. I would become immersed in it and not want to put it down, so it did not take terribly long to read. Years ago I put off reading The Power of One by Bryce Courtenay for ages because it was a big, fat book, then I was annoyed with myself for not reading it sooner--I loved it.


Bobbie57 (bobbie572002) | 899 comments Elaine wrote: "I was wondering if we could make cutting for stone a group read at some point this year. It is on my list of to read, with several books in front.
My favorite fiction last year was undoubtly
[..."


Elaine -- I nominated Cutting For Stone on our last go round. It seemed to be too big and fat for some. So if all else fails and it doesn't get chosen the next time around I'd be happy to have a buddy read with you. I definitely plan to read it in 2011.


Elaine Langer | 125 comments Susan, I only heard of it on NPR while the author was on and he was talking of his own life while writing the book. Apparently his son was also serving in the military. Really good read...:)


message 21: by Alias Reader (last edited Jan 08, 2011 09:44AM) (new)

Alias Reader (AliasReader) | 8456 comments Susan wrote: "I've read several books about polygamy, LDS and FLDS, both fiction and nonfiction. This one certainly has a different outlook than any of the others. I thought it was a great read but YMMV.

For nonfiction, I enjoyed Jon Krakauer's Under the Banner of Heaven.
----------------

I totally agree, Susan. A few of us read it together here a while back and loved it.

I'm nominating it for my f2f book club.


Susan (Nutz4Books) | 236 comments Dang, Elaine, now I have to add another book to my TBR. ;-) Really, thanks though -- looks like a good novel, and one that wasn't on my radar screen.


Alias Reader (AliasReader) | 8456 comments Elaine we will probably do nominations in March, you can nominate Cutting The Stone. That would be great.

We already have group reads selected for Feb/march
Feb- Up From Slavery
March- What's eating Gilbert Grape.


Elaine Langer | 125 comments I was wondering if we could make cutting for stone a group read at some point this year. It is on my list of to read, with several books in front.
My favorite fiction last year was undoubtly
To the End of the Land. It captured me in a way no book has done in a long time. I usually read non-fiction so this book was a nice break.


Susan (Nutz4Books) | 236 comments I've read several books about polygamy, LDS and FLDS, both fiction and nonfiction. This one certainly has a different outlook than any of the others. I thought it was a great read but YMMV.

For nonfiction, I enjoyed Jon Krakauer's Under the Banner of Heaven.


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