Paranormal Romance & Urban Fantasy discussion

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Paranormal Romance > Male Paranormal Romance Authors?

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message 1: by [deleted user] (new)

I have yet to come across any male paranormal romance authors. I'd love to see how their styles and approach might differ from all the amazing females writers I've been reading. Anyone have any suggestions?


message 2: by Joseph (last edited Sep 13, 2010 05:03PM) (new)

Joseph  (BlueManticore) | 203 comments To be honest, I know of very few male urban fantasy authors to begin with. I wouldn't call Jim Butcher's Harry Dresden series paranormal romance and not Justin Gustainis's work either, but they are good UF reads.


message 3: by [deleted user] (new)

Joseph wrote: "To be honest, I know of very few male urban fantasy authors to begin with. I wouldn't call Jim Butcher's Harry Dresden series paranormal romance and not [author:Justin Gustainis|315..."

I like Jim Butcher but you;re right--he is def. not romance. I will give Gustainis a try for my non-romance fix though :)


LethalLovely~You Knew Who I Was With Every Step That I Ran to You (LethalLovely) | 453 comments That is just...creepy. I'm happy your looking for male PNR writers but I just couldn't read about thrusting & throbbing & know some guy wrote it. Creepy.


message 5: by Dawn (last edited Sep 13, 2010 06:39PM) (new)

Dawn (DawnV) | 309 comments You know you raise a good question, outside of Nicholas Sparks are there any male romance writers?

Edit:
So I just did a google search on male romance writers because I was curious turns out they write under female names. So LethalLovely you are not alone.
For example Iain Blair writes as Emma Blair, Hugh C. Rae writes as Jessica Stirling and Bill Spence writes as Jessica Blair.


message 6: by Ann aka Iftcan (new)

Ann aka Iftcan (Iftcan) | 2447 comments Mod
Aren't there a few husband/wife teams writing too? I thought I remembered reading that somewhere. I'm wondering who writes what with those.


message 7: by LethalLovely~You Knew Who I Was With Every Step That I Ran to You (last edited Sep 13, 2010 08:20PM) (new)

LethalLovely~You Knew Who I Was With Every Step That I Ran to You (LethalLovely) | 453 comments Dawn wrote: "You know you raise a good question, outside of Nicholas Sparks are there any male romance writers?

Edit:
So I just did a google search on male romance writers because I was curious turns out they ..."


I'm glad to know I'm not the only one a little creeped out by that idea. More power to the male romance writers out there but I just couldn't see myself reading a romance written by one.

Ann, I know Barb Hendee & J. C. Hendee are a husband/wife team who write the Noble Dead series. But that's UF.


message 8: by Stacia (the 2010 club) (last edited Sep 13, 2010 11:10PM) (new)

Stacia (the 2010 club) (Stacia_R) Ann aka Iftcan wrote: "Aren't there a few husband/wife teams writing too? I thought I remembered reading that somewhere. I'm wondering who writes what with those."

Ilona Andrews is a husband wife team. Their series are more UF though.
Magic Burns (Kate Daniels, #2) by Ilona Andrews On the Edge (The Edge, #1) by Ilona Andrews


message 9: by Dee (new)

Dee (austhokie) Leigh Greenwood who writes western romances real name is Harold Lowry...not sure about any PNR authors though


message 10: by new_user (new)

new_user | 1389 comments I think I've seen a few at the epubs, but if there are any with the major publishers they must use female pseudonyms.


message 11: by Brenna (new)

Brenna Lyons (BrennaLyons) | 177 comments I actually know several of them. Some use female pseudonyms and some don't.

Gregory Norris/Jo Atkinson- He writes under both names, both M/M and M/F (most of his M/F is under the female name because of the inherent bias there is against men that write M/F, but he has a rare few M/F out under that name). You can find some of his Norris work at Phaze and at Under The Moon and some of his Atkinson work at Ravenous Romance. His M/M is edgy, and his M/F is pretty hot...not as edgy.

Rob Preece works as two separate pen names in romance and his own name in straight genre. His female names are Amy Eastlake (and he worked in both indie and NY with that name in traditional heat romance and sensual romance) and...can't recall the other right now. I'd have to ask him for it.

I've met gents that have worked for Harlequin under female pen names. Some have chosen to keep them when working with indie press. Some have chosen to switch to their own names.

Brenna


message 12: by Brenna (new)

Brenna Lyons (BrennaLyons) | 177 comments Ah...I found it. Rob Preece's other female pen name is Robyn Anders. And he was a member of RWA for years.

Brenna


message 13: by Steph (new)

Steph (Angel4492) | 177 comments Evelyn, back in August I researched this a bit online b/c I was interested in creating a male author challenge for my group. Only .... where were the male PNR authors? :)

I know of a bunch of male UF authors and a few romance authors, but was unable to find any "mass market" PNRs written by men.

I guess they prefer UF with a bit'o romance? :) I'll definitely be following your thread for any names ya'll may find.


message 14: by Lucy-ann (new)

Lucy-ann (LucheaB) | 68 comments I wondered about this myself. It's kind of weird that it is such a female dominated genre.


message 15: by Brenna (new)

Brenna Lyons (BrennaLyons) | 177 comments Lucy-Ann,

Between the men raised to think it's a lesser form of writing (picture me rolling my eyes) and the bias against males writing it (which means they take female pen names to avoid the female readers passing on their works), it's not that surprising. With the rise of erotic romance and M/M romance, there are more men coming in under their own names. Men like Will Belegon and Sascha Illyvich and. Some women are actually taking male pen names to write M/M.

Oh, and women have done that for years...especially in SF/F/H writing, where the bias is toward male writers. In fact, even Rowlings was told to write with her initials or a pen name because "Boys WON'T read a fantasy book, even with a male protagonist, if it's written by a woman." Rolling eyes again.

BTW, one of the earlier paranormal romance authors I can name that's a male is Piers Anthony. I don't know how many of you are familiar with Incarnations of Immortality series, but it is DECIDEDLY paranormal sensual romance (save Nox's book which is erotic) and always has been, but they didn't know how to classify that in the 1980s and shelved him in fantasy.

Brenna


message 16: by Carolyn F. (new)

Carolyn F. | 557 comments Dawn wrote: "You know you raise a good question, outside of Nicholas Sparks are there any male romance writers?

Edit:
So I just did a google search on male romance writers because I was curious turns out they ..."


I have to acknowledge that I'm prejudiced against male romance writers. I've tried a few that wrote under male names and didn't really like them. I'll skip any romance books that have male writers. I do the same with murder mysteries, I don't really like male writers. But now that they're using female aliases, I'm sure there were a few I liked and didn't know were men.


message 17: by Carolyn F. (new)

Carolyn F. | 557 comments LethalLovely~When There's Nothing Left to Burn, wrote: "That is just...creepy. I'm happy your looking for male PNR writers but I just couldn't read about thrusting & throbbing & know some guy wrote it. Creepy."

But Lethal, aren't they the ones doing the thrusting and throbbing? I keep thinking they would be able to write it better, but haven't found that at all yet.


message 18: by Steph (new)

Steph (Angel4492) | 177 comments Brenna, I read almost all of Piers' Incarnations series when they came out and really enjoyed them. I don't remember much about them sadly, only that I liked them, so I didn't remember a genre other than fantasy, as you said. They were actually given to me by my husband, then boyfriend, who'd read and loved them.


message 19: by Steph (new)

Steph (Angel4492) | 177 comments I'd read a PNR series or book by a male author. I'm interested to see the difference(s) between m/f writers in that genre.

For now, I'll have to read some PNR eBooks by men.


message 20: by Lucy-ann (new)

Lucy-ann (LucheaB) | 68 comments I have no idea what M/M means? And i can only assume SF means scifi? F means Fantasy? and H means horror?
But thanks for explaining Brenna!


message 21: by Steph (last edited Sep 14, 2010 09:02AM) (new)

Steph (Angel4492) | 177 comments Lucy-Ann, that just means male/male stories. Mainly romances with only men vs m(ale)/f(emale) storylines. :)

And H can sometimes mean historical or horror.


message 22: by [deleted user] (new)

Carolyn F. wrote: "LethalLovely~When There's Nothing Left to Burn, wrote: "That is just...creepy. I'm happy your looking for male PNR writers but I just couldn't read about thrusting & throbbing & know some guy wrote..."

Hahahaha--would you believe my search is partially due to the fact that I want a better idea of the male perspective? Seriously, how the hell does a female know how it feels? Also, I wondered how many would go with cookbook romance format or if they might stray from the formula and inject a man's sensibilities to the genre.

I doubled over with the creepy comment. I can't say I get that point of view, maybe it's just an uncomfortable/awkward feeling? I just never would have thought "creepy" for this topic :)


message 23: by Brenna (new)

Brenna Lyons (BrennaLyons) | 177 comments M/M is male/male (stories about gay men in relationships). There is a bias, in some corners, against women writing M/M, so some female authors take male names to write it.

And yes... SF/F/H is science fiction/fantasy/horror. There is a big bias against it, even today. I mean... Women were writing it as far back as Mary Shelley. Some huge names wrote it or still do, and there is STILL a bias against it. You should see some of the crap out there about how women can't write about "important subjects." Rolling eyes. Grin...

B


message 24: by [deleted user] (new)

Carolyn F. wrote: "Dawn wrote: "You know you raise a good question, outside of Nicholas Sparks are there any male romance writers?

Edit:
So I just did a google search on male romance writers because I was curious..."


Can you tell me what you didn't like? Was it a style, POV, voice thing, or something else?


message 25: by [deleted user] (new)

Brenna wrote: "I actually know several of them. Some use female pseudonyms and some don't.

Gregory Norris/Jo Atkinson- He writes under both names, both M/M and M/F (most of his M/F is under the female name be..."


Super helpful Brenna, thanks!


message 26: by Brenna (new)

Brenna Lyons (BrennaLyons) | 177 comments Evelyn,

Some of the best and hottest romance authors I know do the same thing I do to write the male perspective on sex. ASK the men in your life. Honestly, they will tell you if you got it wrong. I don't do it with every book but enough to get a feel for what they've said.

B


message 27: by [deleted user] (new)

I guess Terry Goodkind is sort of a romance writer--The Sword of Truth (fantasy) definitely had a huge romantic pull/ storyline. But I felt the author was so busy pushing his pro-capitalism massage that it distracted from a really decent romance.


message 28: by Carolyn F. (new)

Carolyn F. | 557 comments Evelyn wrote: "Carolyn F. wrote: "Dawn wrote: "You know you raise a good question, outside of Nicholas Sparks are there any male romance writers?

Edit:
So I just did a google search on male romance writers becau..."


The relationship or budding relationship (no surprise there I guess) weren't fleshed out well. I felt the sex scenes were very minimally described almost in an old-fashioned camera fades to right kind of way. I had thought the sex scenes would be a lot more graphic from a male perspective and they weren't. Maybe the women who right the sex scenes from a male point of view ask men all the nitty gritty questions they don't convey in their books.

In murder mysteries I found the opposite with the violence and death scenes, they were way too graphic for me. There I like the find the body in the library and then try to figure out what happened.


message 29: by Ann aka Iftcan (new)

Ann aka Iftcan (Iftcan) | 2447 comments Mod
A case in point for a female forced to write under male names (she used a number of different ones before finally changing her name) was Andre Norton. She's one of the "fathers" (or in her case, mother) of modern sci-fi/fantasy, but she couldn't sell her work unless she wrote them under male names. There are still some books that you have to search for the other names if you want true first editions.


message 30: by new_user (last edited Sep 14, 2010 09:56PM) (new)

new_user | 1389 comments I don't think there are many differences between men and women, and I've read enough erotic fiction from male authors to see that's true in literature. Women enjoy dirty talk, men enjoy dirty talk. Men enjoy visuals and, despite popular belief, so do women. Et cetera. The draw -or not- more likely differs from individual to individual. There are some women that turn up their nose at genre romance too. I think it was just the old notion of a romance novel meaning a woman finding her true love, i.e. focus on a woman with the male a paragon or caricature, that's turned men away. It seems more accessible now, I think, with more interest and opportunity for male perspective and a dash of realism (at least compared to bodice rippers)- just look at how many women enjoy a PNR told from the male PoV.


message 31: by Dee (new)

Dee (austhokie) this has my interest piqued now...while i'm not studying cognitive psychology or personality...the idea of gender identity in writing and can people identify who wrote what is interesting


message 32: by new_user (new)

new_user | 1389 comments I think more of the differences originate from socialization, i.e. "masculinity" is positively reinforced in men by society. So I think it makes more sense to say that a man comes to have a "male" writing style than to say that that is the only way possible biologically.

I'll give you an example. I tend to stay away from male authors of fantasy because they simply give two flips about character relationships and focus instead on, say, action. But I have read male authors who overturn this stereotype and excel above many men and women in this respect. Case in point, Guy Gavriel Kay's Lions of Al-Rassan. His character relationships are so outstanding that the ending leaves you crying. I don't mean to say that my experience is the measuring stick, but a lot of his readers have said the same of that book.


message 33: by Dee (new)

Dee (austhokie) i'd be curious to see if confronted with two samples of writing - 1 male and 1 female for a scene whether individuals could identify which was written by which


message 34: by new_user (new)

new_user | 1389 comments That'd be a fun test. :D


message 35: by Lucy-ann (new)

Lucy-ann (LucheaB) | 68 comments I would definitely participate in that one!


message 36: by Brenna (new)

Brenna Lyons (BrennaLyons) | 177 comments There are a lot of rather subjective tests (some of them automated...plug in the excerpt and let it test) for male/female writing, and they don't always call it right. Some are based on word choice. Some are based on active vs. passive use. Some are based on introspection vs. action or how much detail is used (number of adjectives and adverbs) or the sexes of characters or amount of dialog vs. narrative or... You get the idea.

Some of my work is described as very much in the male voice. Some of mine is described as very female. Most of those tests come up fairly evenly split for me...55%/45% or thereabouts, one way or the other.

Brenna


message 37: by [deleted user] (new)

I'm not sure you'd be able to tell the difference between a make and female writer--as it is we have men writing w/ female pen names (and vice versa) and we don't stop reading to go, "Hey... wait a minute... I think Susan Girliehead is actually a man!"

But I wanted to actually read some male work to see if this thought I had was true or not. You never know, maybe there are subtle differences--but then, if I'm actually looking for them, I'd run the risk of bias in the experiment.


message 38: by Carolyn F. (new)

Carolyn F. | 557 comments Lucy-ann wrote: "I would definitely participate in that one!"

It would have to blind because I definitely would come in with my reconceived notions.


message 39: by Pickles (new)

Pickles (angstypickles) | 219 comments Personally, and maybe I'm in the minority here, but it wouldn't bother me at all to read a PNR (or any other romance) written by a man. I read and enjoy mysteries, thrillers, and fantasy novels written by men that contain some element of romance, so I can't see myself having any sort of issue reading a romance novel/series by a male author. For me, if the writing and the romance is good, I don't care who the author is.


message 40: by Brenna (new)

Brenna Lyons (BrennaLyons) | 177 comments That's how I feel about it, Harper. If the writing is good, what do I care if the writer is male or female?

B


message 41: by Ann aka Iftcan (new)

Ann aka Iftcan (Iftcan) | 2447 comments Mod
Hey, I found it kind of nice that some of the people on here say they won't buy a book written by a male. I look at it as supporting females and making up for my Dad's shopping habits (he wouldn't touch a book by anyone who has an even vaguely female name.) Personally I buy books by everyone. If the story grabs me (I usually read at least the back and the first 5 to 10 pages before I buy it, if I'm not familiar with an author's name) I don't care who wrote it.


message 42: by new_user (new)

new_user | 1389 comments I would read a PNR written by a man. :) I've always thought it would be interesting.


message 43: by Dee (new)

Dee (austhokie) oh definately a blind study...and possibly more than 1 sample of each...

i know i put some of my writing into one of those search engines and it told me i wrote like james joyce...lol!


message 44: by Joseph (last edited Sep 17, 2010 06:03AM) (new)

Joseph  (BlueManticore) | 203 comments I never really paid much attention to the sex of the authors I read. In fact, there are some times I can't tell from the name of the author whether he or she is a he or she! lol. Plus, with so many that do use pseudonymns, you can't always be positive that feminine sounding name like Susan or Jill is female or a masculine sounding name like Fred or Jack is male. Besides, don't they say don't judge a book by its cover? Why should you judge a book right off by just the sound of the name of the author or whether the author is male or female? Read it first, then judge! :-)


message 45: by Samuel (new)

Samuel Capri (Samuel_Capri) There's the misconception that men can't write emotions as well as woman. Men most certainly can. Men fall in love too. Perhaps men don't believe they can write convincing female protagonists. Right now, the majority of protagonists in paranormal romances are women, but that doesn't mean male protagonists aren't equally accepted. If it's a well written story, then it will speak for itself.

Also, there are a few men out there that write in this genre under pseudonyms.


message 46: by Fluttrbs (new)

Fluttrbs | 45 comments I don't pay much attention to the author Gender. I read what I like. I have read some good Romance and PN romance by both men and women. Leigh Greenwood -a male author has some excellent historical romance books.


message 47: by Samuel (new)

Samuel Capri (Samuel_Capri) Fluttrbs wrote: "I don't pay much attention to the author Gender. I read what I like. I have read some good Romance and PN romance by both men and women. Leigh Greenwood -a male author has some excellent historica..."
I totally agree with you on that


message 48: by LibraryLass (new)

LibraryLass | 81 comments I'm with some of the others here, I don't actually care whether the writer is male or female, just as long as the book is written well.

I have read a few books written by a collaborative team of both male/female. I read The edge series, by Ilona Andrews which is the husband and wife team. I have also read books written collaboratively by Jennifer Crusie and Bob Mayer. In all cases, I have never been able to tell which parts of the story have been written by who.

I have read other genres by male authors who have included a token romance and found them more 'clinical' than 'romantic' but that (IMO) is because the focus of the book is not the romance. For me, I think that if there was only the surname of authors on any book, I would have a hard time knowing (or caring) if the book was written by a male or female.

I do know, as a public librarian, there is tremendous bias by both men and women as to what sex an author is as to whether they will read them or not.

For me, a well written story is a well written story.


message 49: by Dante (new)

Dante Craddock (DanteCraddock) | 8 comments This is a very interesting discussion. I am fairly new to the genre of PNR, so I never realized the disparage in female to male writers. Who knew I was the odd man out. I happen to be one of those elusive male PNR writers. I write PNR because it is what came out when I started writing my first novel.


message 50: by N. (new)

N. Wetzel (NAWetzel) | 6 comments I actually write from a male pov. Dunno why, just flows out of me that way. I have found most males love it. They have told me that I have managed to portay the males side very well. Which makes me feel as though I have done my job right. However, I dont see the harm in who writes the story as long as it is done well, but I think for others it is a way to feel closer with the author. If girls are reading romance novels by males, perhaps if feels like they have a peek into someones soul. And it makes the books more alluring.
As far as male romance writers go though... I would love to find some. As long as they are clean. Which that makes finding a book hard for me. would love to see what folks come up with.


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Books mentioned in this topic

On the Edge (other topics)
Magic Burns (other topics)

Authors mentioned in this topic

Justin Gustainis (other topics)
Jim Butcher (other topics)
Barb Hendee (other topics)
J.C. Hendee (other topics)
Mark Henwick (other topics)
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