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OLD TASK HELP THREADS > 20.3 El’s Task (Best Review Contest) – Feminist Literature

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message 101: by El (new)

El Manday wrote: "In the 19th Wife, the 19th wife is not even the main character, while her story is certainly told it is much more about a young gay man escaping a closed extremist community."

Thanks, Manday. Then I will have to say No to The 19th Wife.


message 102: by Charity (new)

Charity (charityross) El wrote: "I haven't read this myself, so if someone else has feel free to jump in with opinions.

Is it more about the books the women read than it is about women's experiences in Tehran? I understand Nafisi started this book club for women and it was not socially acceptable - did the book club continue? Did it help or hurt the women in their relationships?"


I have no idea, but I'm very curious myself. I have other books for this task, so it's no big deal if this book doesn't fit. I noticed it was shelved 31 times as feminism, so figured I would ask about it.

If anyone has any info about the book, I'd love to know. Thanks! :)


message 104: by El (new)


message 105: by Ashley FL (new)

Ashley FL | 732 comments I know a lot of people read Gods in Alabama for the summer challenge and I saw that in the completed tasks thread that another book by that author, Backseat Saints, is being used for this task. (some character overlap, though I think not technically a sequel)

Anyway, thought that might help some people!


message 106: by Katy (new)

Katy | 450 comments El wrote: "Charity wrote: "Thoughts on Reading Lolita in Tehran?

Not sure if I will use this or something else I have, but I thought I'd go ahead and get it approved."

I haven't read this my..."


It's been a while since I've read it but I recall it being less about the books the club read and more about the lengths the women had to go to in order to participate in the reading and discussion of the banned books and the contrast between their growing intellectual freedom within the group and their stifling out in the real world. There are definitely literary-analysis parts to it, but at least what stood out the most to me were the women's lives.


message 108: by El (new)

El Sorry, Iamthez, from what I can tell it's not particularly feminist so much as it's a memoir by a woman.


message 109: by Iamthez (new)

Iamthez | 54 comments Thanks for the prompt reply :) I'll keep searching away!


message 110: by Josalyn (new)

Josalyn | 80 comments Eat, Pray, Love?


message 111: by El (new)

El Josalyn wrote: "Eat, Pray, Love?"

Sorry, I don't see anything indicating this is a feminist work of literature. I'm going to have to say no to that one.


message 112: by Leah (new)

Leah Here's a few I'm considering for this task - which, if any, will work?

Promiscuities: The Secret Struggle for Womanhood by Naomi Wolf

The Dance of the Dissident Daughter by Sue Monk Kidd

The Marriage Sabbatical: The Journey That Brings You Home by Cheryl Jarvis (I know it doesn't sound particularly "feminist" from the title, but from the various reviews/descriptions I read, it poses the theory that women can nurture themselves creatively, intellectually or spiritually by taking time away from their significant relationships, and return happier & healthier. Women trying to change the traditional view of marriage and child rearing? Interesting concept, anyway...)

Thanks!


message 113: by El (new)

El Bev, I would say Promiscuities and Dissident Daughter work better than the Marriage Sabbatical (which smells more self-help-y than feminist).


message 114: by Leah (new)

Leah El wrote: "Bev, I would say Promiscuities and Dissident Daughter work better than the Marriage Sabbatical (which smells more self-help-y than feminist)."

Thanks, El - works for me! I'll go with Promiscuities, I think...


message 115: by El (new)

El That one looks interesting - I hope you enjoy it!


message 116: by Deedee (last edited Oct 18, 2010 12:55PM) (new)

Deedee | 1412 comments I've been reading The Secret History of the Mongol Queens: How the Daughters of Genghis Khan Rescued His Empire by Jack Weatherford for another task. The more I read, however, the more I think it would fit task 20.3. The Secret History of the Mongol Queens: How the Daughters of Genghis Khan Rescued His Empire is a non-fiction book.

Here's part of the goodreads summary:
"The Mongol queens of the thirteenth century ruled the largest empire the world has ever known. Yet sometime near the end of the century, censors cut a section from The Secret History of the Mongols, leaving a single tantalizing quote from Genghis Khan: “Let us reward our female offspring.” Only this hint of a father’s legacy for his daughters remained of a much larger story.

The queens of the Silk Route turned their father’s conquests into the world’s first truly international empire, fostering trade, education, and religion throughout their territories and creating an economic system that stretched from the Pacific to the Mediterranean."

In the introduction to the book, it says:
The royal Mongol women raced horses, commanded in war, presided as judges over criminal cases, ruled vast territories, and sometimes wrestled men in public sporting competitions. They arrogantly rejected the customs of civilized women of neighboring cultures, such as wearing the veil, binding their feet, or hiding in seclusion."

This theme of powerful female rulers, succeeding against male expectations, is present throughout Part I of The Secret History of the Mongol Queens: How the Daughters of Genghis Khan Rescued His Empire (the part I've read so far) and, I suspect, for the rest of the book as well.

So the question is: can I claim The Secret History of the Mongol Queens: How the Daughters of Genghis Khan Rescued His Empire for this task? Thanks!


message 117: by El (new)

El Deedee wrote: "I've been reading The Secret History of the Mongol Queens: How the Daughters of Genghis Khan Rescued His Empire by Jack Weatherford for another task. The more I read, ..."

Deedee, that looks really interesting - thanks for your review and thoughts on it. I'm going to add it to my TBR. And yes, I think it works for this task as well.


message 118: by Paul (last edited Oct 20, 2010 12:24PM) (new)

Paul (metshaft) | 99 comments how about Blood and Guts in High School ? Really don't fancy reading it, but its part of the 1001 books to read before you die list, which i'm also reading my way through... Two birds, one stone.


message 119: by El (new)

El Hmm, Paul, that's a tough one. I haven't read it myself, but the reviews I have seen indicate the character has been or is oppressed in some way - on the other hand I don't see anything that indicates she really overcame any of those oppressions by the end. I'm not sure I understand what Acker's "thesis" was (for lack of a better word) for writing the book.

Has anyone else read it and have an opinion?

Off the top of my head I guess I can't say no necessarily, but if you have something else that fits more appropriately that might be better.


message 120: by Paul (new)

Paul (metshaft) | 99 comments No probs, I've recognized a few books from the 1001 list on your pre-approved list so at least I've got an alternative. I think I'll go with 'The Awakening'.


message 121: by El (new)

El That's a good one, Paul. I hope you like it.


message 122: by Sandy (new)

Sandy | 9711 comments Mod
El, did you ever reach a decision on Reading Lolita in Tehran? I'm reading it now, and the position of women in Iran after the revolution is definitely a central theme - and a lot of it is pretty scary, too. Imagine being imprisoned for several days and subjected to several forced "virginity checks" because you were found with several other girls, all fully covered in the chadors, talking in an outdoor garden with one boy!


message 123: by El (new)

El Sandy, as long as the position of women in Iran is a central theme, I will accept it. I just wanted to be sure it wasn't so much about the books they were reading than what the women were going through in their society. Sounds like it fits.


message 124: by Sandy (new)

Sandy | 9711 comments Mod
El wrote: "Sandy, as long as the position of women in Iran is a central theme, I will accept it. I just wanted to be sure it wasn't so much about the books they were reading than what the women were going th..."

It's interesting how she uses the books - showing how her students (both in her private group and in her university classes) had trouble dealing with, in particular, some of the female characters. While she talks some about the books, it's more a vehicle for dealing with life in Iran and especially for the position of women.


message 126: by El (new)

El Looks like the author has made some serious efforts to try to protect other girls from having to go through the same things that she did, so I'll say yes.


message 127: by Kathryn CA (new)

Kathryn CA (kathrynlouwCA) | 928 comments Along the same lines of Stolen Innocence, would Escape by Carolyn Jessop work? Or Favorite Wife by Susan Ray Schmidt? Thanks!


message 128: by El (new)

El I'll accept Escape, but there's no info on Favorite Wife so I'll have to say no to that. Just because it's about polygamy doesn't mean it's automatically feminist (which is why I said no to The 19th Wife).


message 129: by Kathryn CA (new)

Kathryn CA (kathrynlouwCA) | 928 comments Great! Thanks, El. I have had the book Escape and been meaning to read it for quiet some time now. This task gives me the perfect opportunity to finally do it.


message 131: by El (new)

El Vanessa, yes, that works.


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