The Life of a Book Addict discussion

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The Chit Chat Board > Get Paid To Read?

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message 1: by Trish (new)

Trish (TrishaG) | 193 comments Does anyone know how to get paid to read books without having a degree?

I LOVE to read, and do it so much lately that it would be a DREAM to get PAID for it too! Does anyone know how?


message 2: by DJ (new)

DJ  (DJDivaofJava) | 2985 comments Sorry No but if you find out could you let me know?....
That would be a dream!!


message 3: by Trish (new)

Trish (TrishaG) | 193 comments DJ wrote: "Sorry No but if you find out could you let me know?....
That would be a dream!!"


Let's hope someone in this group knows the secret!!! There HAS to be a way, I just don't know what it is yet! But when I find out I'll let ya know!


message 4: by DJ (new)

DJ  (DJDivaofJava) | 2985 comments Cheers and if I come across anything I will let you know :-)


message 5: by Danielle (new)

Danielle Why would someone pay you to read? Other then an editor or critic I can't think of any other reason. But, that would be a fantastic job:)


message 6: by Trish (last edited Jul 29, 2010 11:50AM) (new)

Trish (TrishaG) | 193 comments I know that people earn free books & money to blog about books if you allow advertising, but I was wondering how much money people actually make doing that.
GR is making money by just having this site, they make money per each book swapped, for advertisments, etc...
Maybe there are publishers out there that pay book reviewers to see if there is a public interest in their books. I don't know, that's why I thought I'd ask. I figure it can't hurt to dream or ask:)


message 7: by Danielle (new)

Danielle Interesting. Hope you get to do it.


message 8: by K.B. (new)

K.B. Hallman (kbhallman) | 321 comments Trish, you don't have any degree or you don't have an English or literature degree? I get the feeling that you want to read the book and give your opinion of it. To the best of my knowledge, the paid reviewers need to have degrees. And in this market, it'd be tough to break into the production side without a degree, but if there is a local typesetter, apply for a job as a proofreader. After you have some experience, it becomes easier to get another job without a degree. Or see if any of the local publishers are hiring editorial assistants. Sometimes the editorial assistants get to read incoming manuscripts to deem whether they are worthy of being passed on to an acquisitions editor.


Mary: Harry Dresden's Love Slave (HarryDresdensLoveSlave) | 166 comments You could try setting up your own blog or website review site. I have never done this and don't know anything about it. But some of them might make money once they get up and running and develope enough of a following to be able to sell advertising space. The people who started goodreads might make money now. But I imagine it took quite a bit of money and time to get it to that point. It costs a lot of money to run a website like this. They probably didn't get much for advertising until they had a good sized membership.

A book blog or review website might at least get you some free books from publishers. But again probably only if you can show a good amount of traffic.


message 10: by Susan (new)

Susan | 206 comments I used to do reviews for armchair interviews, I got to keep the book I received and to me that was payment enough.


message 11: by K.B. (new)

K.B. Hallman (kbhallman) | 321 comments Susan wrote: "I used to do reviews for armchair interviews, I got to keep the book I received and to me that was payment enough."

I have a friend who does them for some website, I'm not sure which one, but it's the same deal--free book.


message 12: by Julie (new)

Julie S. Some schools pay students as a reward for reading, but I have a feeling that this is not what you are asking for.


message 13: by Trish (new)

Trish (TrishaG) | 193 comments Julie wrote: "Some schools pay students as a reward for reading, but I have a feeling that this is not what you are asking for."

Mmm, not so much Julie, but thanks!


message 14: by Sterlingcindysu (new)

Sterlingcindysu Trish wrote: "Does anyone know how to get paid to read books without having a degree?

I LOVE to read, and do it so much lately that it would be a DREAM to get PAID for it too! Does anyone know how?"


Ahh, you don't say to get paid to read what! As a paralegal, I had to read many cases and brief them (a short summary) for the junior attorneys--hours and hours reading. Sometimes juicy, sometimes not.


message 15: by Danielle (new)

Danielle That is true Trish you didn't mention what kind of reading. I was assuming novels. Sterlingsindysu brings up a good point, my future job will involve tons and tons of reading and the proper conservation of said readings. Have you ever thought of working in a library or bookstore? Some bookstores require their employees to have firsthand knowledge of the books they are recommending and not all employees of libraries hold degrees.


message 16: by Trish (new)

Trish (TrishaG) | 193 comments Oh yeah, small detail I forgot to mention. I can only read something that I'm interested in, otherwise my mind wanders & I have no clue what I've read.

A bookstore or library job would be great, but I might be working for/with my husband full time soon, so I was thinking about something I could do in my spare time or during "down time" at work. Maybe something on-line, I dunno?

Thanks for the suggestions though, keep 'em coming!


message 17: by Kathryn (new)

Kathryn (26kathryn) | 34 comments You could do a book review blog, if you put advertising on it you could make money, if you just put up pay-per-click ads you won't make much money unless you have hundreds of visitors. But if you put up pay-monthly ads you might make a bit more. Plus publishers do send out free books once you get some regular readers.

Also you could become a proofreader. My mum used to proofread children's books in her spare time. Basically she had to read them to check for spelling errors and things. It gave her a nice bit of extra income on the side. I'm not sure how easy it is to get into though, my mum got into it because she was friends with a lady who used to work for a publisher.

Also you could get in touch with publishers, maybe do an internship as an assistant or something to gain some experience. It probably wouldn't be paid at first, but perhaps they'd give you a paid position later on.


message 18: by Sterlingcindysu (last edited Jul 31, 2010 08:36AM) (new)

Sterlingcindysu Danielle wrote: "That is true Trish you didn't mention what kind of reading. I was assuming novels. Sterlingsindysu brings up a good point, my future job will involve tons and tons of reading and the proper conse..."

For a very very short time I worked as a library clerk and to be honest, it just killed reading for me. I now volunteer at the library book sale, and 3-4 hours is enough for me there--lifting, sorting and shelving books takes alot out of you and the demands/stupid question they ask someone with a big VOLUNTEER pin on lights my short fuse. If I worked at a store, I think I would spend my entire paycheck there, so I'm not any better off than reading library books! My son worked at Borders one holiday season though, and got many, many gcs for different staff promotions they had--you know what we got for every gift that year from him!


message 19: by Julie (new)

Julie S. That's too bad that you had a bad experience with working as a library clerk. During the school year, I volunteer in the school library, and it actually has me reading more. I guess it is because I see more books that I would not normally see.


message 20: by Sterlingcindysu (last edited Jul 31, 2010 09:26AM) (new)

Sterlingcindysu Julie wrote: "That's too bad that you had a bad experience with working as a library clerk. During the school year, I volunteer in the school library, and it actually has me reading more. I guess it is because I..."

With a school library, you don't have people arguing about paying a .35 fine for 20 minutes, saying that you're stupid and can't find anything, and then pull out a gold cc to pay for it. (and then your supervisor asks why you haven't gotten around to shelving books). Or parents dropping off little kids and expecting you to be a free babysitter while they're running roughshod and throwing books around. Or asking help in using a copier for the 10th time that hour, refilling paper, or expecting you to teach them Word or Excel. Then there's the usual complaints of standing for hours at a time, back/arm problems from the weight of books, shooing armourous teens out of study rooms, etc.

It's my philosophy that when something is free (such as the library) people don't appreciate it. If they had to pay something, then their attitudes and behavior would be much better. I just couldn't get over the amount of yelling and arguing I had to put up with each day, "why were you closed on Monday?" "Why is the computer so slow?" etc.


message 21: by K.B. (new)

K.B. Hallman (kbhallman) | 321 comments Our library clerks usually get a chuckle out of me when I come in for a reserved book. One of them always comments on how nice it is to see someone excited about a book. Really? You'd think lots of folks at the library would be excited about a book. After all, that's why so many of them are there.

I don't think I'll share your experiences with my son whom I'm trying to convince to volunteer at the local library.


message 22: by Danielle (last edited Jul 31, 2010 10:13AM) (new)

Danielle My libraries have always been very nice and quiet. Very rarely do I see children, they have their own section that is closed off from the rest or they don't have a section so they do not come. A librarian must know how to work programs on the computer and helping people with those programs is part of their job. I guess it shouldn't be expected from a volunteer however. I will be getting my degree in information sciences and archives. If I wasn't going the archive route I would be a librarian. I am sure some libraries are better than others, more funding. People still argue at school libraries. Students and teachers alike don't want pay fines and everyone hates a slow computer. Customer service can be a tough job.


message 23: by Sterlingcindysu (new)

Sterlingcindysu re K.B.--being a volunteer is completely different than being a clerk--my son was a volunteer during middle school and they always gave him interesting assignments. They will ask if you want to work with the public or not, and the range of duties can range from dusting to inputing things in their database. I'm a volunteer now, so whenever someone asks me something outside of my area (the book sale), I just point to my pin and refer them to the librarians.


message 24: by K.B. (new)

K.B. Hallman (kbhallman) | 321 comments So, I'm curious. Books from our library never smell. How do libraries manage that? I can see remnants of people's snacks in the books sometimes, but none have ever smelled musty, dusty, or smokey.


message 25: by Sterlingcindysu (last edited Jul 31, 2010 02:49PM) (new)

Sterlingcindysu Danielle wrote: "My libraries have always been very nice and quiet. Very rarely do I see children, they have their own section that is closed off from the rest or they don't have a section so they do not come. A ..."

That must be heaven (having a quiet library)! I've lived in different states, and there's always been literally hundreds of children in any library I've been in at any time. Now in northern VA, they have 1-2 story hours in the morning, and with some day care centers bringing in 20-40 apiece, there's ALOT of kids, certainly over 200. Sure they have their own section, and multipurpose rooms for the story hour, but there always seems to be a dozen running around. As a volunteer I do the usual "I'm so worried your child will get hurt" IF I can find a parent or babysitter nearby.

I disagree that librarians and/or clerks should teach computer programs. With over 25 computer stations, there's no way possible the one reference librarian can teach someone how to change a font in word, to mail merge, etc. and still do their job. If you're talking about how to use the library system to find or hold books, then yes, the librarian does show them how to do that.

Yelling at the clerk about a slow computer doesn't help matters any. The clerks are also working with that slow system too!

I think clerks are paid very well in our area, between $16 and $19 p/hr. They've also installed 5 self check out centers where patrons can pay their fines as well as checking out. That has to cut down on the amount of grief clerks get on items they have no control over.

You're right, customer service can be tough--my mistake when getting hired was that I thought library patrons would be "nicer" than in retail or at restaurants.


message 26: by Lekeshua (new)

Lekeshua | 49 comments Trish wrote: "Does anyone know how to get paid to read books without having a degree?

I LOVE to read, and do it so much lately that it would be a DREAM to get PAID for it too! Does anyone know how?"


Trish, I have been looking for years to have a career in reading without going back to school. With two babies and a husband I feel I missed my chance of not changing my major to what I wanted to do prior to graduating. I dream that I am reading manuscripts in my office, at home and in the park. I have heard and read articles about bloggers making money from the blog site through advertisements and such. I have been going back and forth about starting a blog about books but there are so many and I don't want to simply blend in. If I find away to find our dream job or you find it lets keep each other posted.


message 27: by Irene (new)

Irene Hollimon | 74 comments get paid to read - I wish! but could you choose or would someone just send you stuff?


message 28: by Lekeshua (new)

Lekeshua | 49 comments Irene without a degree and with little to no experience it would be best to not be picky. I just wish society wasn't so blind to those without a degree or with a degree in that field. And the cost of education is so expensive many who want to better themselves without causing financial burden on themselves that they will never or take a life time to get out of. Employers forget that in some way they are going to have to invest something in there employees. Maybe it's just me being unrealistic.


message 29: by Irene (new)

Irene Hollimon | 74 comments I've got an Associate's Degree -bummer that not really considered having a degree.
When you say I have a degree, most people assume you're talking you were able to get a Bachelor's Degree.


message 30: by Lekeshua (new)

Lekeshua | 49 comments I believe any degree is a degree. You took the time and money to get it so it should be viewed as a degree if it's part of a job requirement unless they are asking for a master's. I have a bachelor's but it doesn't get me more pay.


message 31: by Danielle (new)

Danielle Lekeshua wrote: "Irene without a degree and with little to no experience it would be best to not be picky. I just wish society wasn't so blind to those without a degree or with a degree in that field. And the cost ..."

I agree that there are individuals who are more than capable to work in jobs w/out degrees. However there are fields where it is necessary that an individual holds a graduate or doctorate degree. Those degrees are very specific and not just anyone can get one. Only individuals who are able to put in the necessary work and time will receive one. It takes extreme dedication and willingness to go into debt. Education does cost quite a bit but there are so many ways people can get free money for school. If you are on the lower end on the financial scale the government will give you quite a bit that does not have to be paid back. If you take out a loan there are those that do not accrue interest or need to be paid back until you are done with college. If you have good grades there are so many scholarships out there. Another thing to think about is the money that a college graduate makes compared to a non-college grad. Especially if one holds a graduate or doctorate degree. The debt that one has after college can be paid off. Many times a graduate's employer will pay off their debt if they agree to sign a contract for 2 to 4 years. Definitely worth it (I think).


message 32: by Lekeshua (new)

Lekeshua | 49 comments I understand what you are saying but some cities and states prize the degree with a money benefit and others don't believe that person who has invested the time and money are any different than the person who has. Unfortunately I am not low enough on the financial status but with raising two children and have to make ends meet I don't have the money to fund my education. I have recently looked into earning a master's but paying $27,000.00 and the program last a year and 2 months with two babies and paying for daycare and the commute to work didn't sound like I will be doing anything but causing more financial stress on my family. And I don't qualify for funding and I don't need to pay on any more loans.


message 33: by Danielle (last edited Jul 31, 2010 05:41PM) (new)

Danielle That's expensive for an in-state school. Is it a private institution? I have been researching various schools for the past year for my grad degree. It seems that schools cost about $8 to $9000 a year (for a good public school). I don't know if you are single mother or not. But if you happen to be there are a ton of programs and scholarships for single mom's. Also many schools offer child care (at least mine have) for students. What type of grad degree are you looking at? Is it possible there are paid internships that go along with your degree that you can do?


message 34: by Lekeshua (new)

Lekeshua | 49 comments It's devry university and was interested in accounting since I'm involved in it at my current job. I wanted to be more marketable if another round of playoffs occur. I'm married with a two year old son and a 7 month old daughter. I work full time and don't see how i can afford an internship. Work will only pay$ 5000 a year if approved. If i could have more home time with my babied that would be great.


message 35: by G (new)

G (NerdGirlBlogger) | 57 comments Just start a blog and write reviews on the books you do read. Who cares if you have a degree in anything or not. If people like your reviews, offers will eventually come your way for review copies in due time. That is how I started.

I have had a few offers from authors to review their books for money, but I turned them down. My blog is for fun, for me, to share what I like and don't like, but I did managed to get a permanent writing job from the reviews I have posted on my blog.

Hope that helps!


message 36: by K.B. (new)

K.B. Hallman (kbhallman) | 321 comments Good job, NerdGirl. Do you sell advertising space? I was stunned to find out how much money some folks are estimated to be making on advertising associated with their YouTube videos. I think one man was believed to make over $300K. Yikes. Wish I were funny.


message 37: by Trish (new)

Trish (TrishaG) | 193 comments Thanks NerdGirl! I'll keep working on the blog situation & hope it pays off, literally. Heehee!

K.B. 300K for youtube! Wow! No wonder so many people do it. (My wheels will be spinning for funny idea for awhile...Hmmm...)


message 38: by Keiji (last edited Aug 24, 2010 01:08AM) (new)

Keiji Miashin There's catch with the blog thing, though. If you really want to make a 'career' out of it there's a few things you have to work on.

1. The "I can't read it unless I like it line" should probably go. Certainly you can build a following around things you only like but you are unnecessarily limiting your reach and range of readership. I say read anything and everything until you have a large enough following/advertising that you can afford to cut things back and do them your way.

2. You'll need to be reading all the time. A blog that only updates once every week and a half isn't going to be as popular as one that updates once every three days. Conversely you can set up a schedule (i.e. "this blog updates every Wednesday and Sunday"). I would say this is the better path to choose. Build up a stock of reviews before starting the blog, so you have fallback on those days/weeks your sick/don't feel like reading/don't have the time, and publish those reviews on your update dates. It also makes things easier on readers as they know exactly when to come looking for an update.

3. Develop a voice. Something unique to your writing. Maybe you're overly harsh? Can find the humor in anything? Have a quick wit? Always find the good in a book? Maybe you know how to take a book and break it down for your readers so they can understand it better or learn to be better writers themselves? Having something that's unique to just yourself will make sure that you catch reader's interest, be memorable, and that you'll have something readers will return for (instead of going to another reviewer or blog).

There's no easy to way to make money doing anything. If you want to make money reading, unfortunately you'll have to work for even that. Of course, if this turns out to be something you really enjoy then it won't feel like work.

Best of luck to ya.


message 39: by Susan (new)

Susan | 206 comments That's some great advice Keiji! I just wish I could do a blog and stick with it, but what you said makes sense.


message 40: by Trish (new)

Trish (TrishaG) | 193 comments Sounds like more great advice! I have lots to work on!

I wrecked my car yesterday so I'm stranded at home with nothing but time & books. (That's one way to turn a negative situation into a positive one, I guess!)
Plus nobody got seriously hurt- THANK GOD!
Thanks again!


message 41: by Isabelle (new)

Isabelle (madame_izab0u) | 24 comments Keiji wrote: "There's catch with the blog thing, though. If you really want to make a 'career' out of it there's a few things you have to work on.

1. The "I can't read it unless I like it line" should probably ..."


Thanks for that! Looks like you've got some experience in blogging... Am I right?


message 42: by Keiji (new)

Keiji Miashin A bit, as well as watching many blogs and seeing what works and what doesn't.

Blogging is a lot like gold mining. There's a few that strike it really really rich, and the rest are lucky to break even.


message 43: by ErinBeth (new)

ErinBeth | 399 comments This is prob a really stupid question, but I've never understood how you would go about setting up a blog. I mean, is there a certain website you can go to, or do you have to create your own website? That part seems like it's be really hard to figure out


message 44: by Marilu (last edited Aug 24, 2010 07:05PM) (new)

Marilu | 171 comments Erin_88888888 wrote: "This is prob a really stupid question, but I've never understood how you would go about setting up a blog. I mean, is there a certain website you can go to, or do you have to create your own websi..."

go to www.blogger.com and you can create a blog there! Just follow the steps. It is pretty simple. If you have any questions, just ask. I just started one last week, and it was pretty simple. I even made my own button with an html code.....lol!


message 45: by ErinBeth (new)

ErinBeth | 399 comments Thanks, I will check it out


message 46: by Jerry (new)

Jerry (sanddawgg) | 22 comments Just my two cents on the blogging book reading angle. I tried the blogging thing for awhile, and while blogging is easy, making money blogging is a lot tougher in my experience. You'll be lucky to have time for reading unless you're talking about reading web pages to figure out all the angles about advertising, page ranks, optimization.. it's a whole industry unto itself. Last point, Amazon, Goodreads... have no problem getting people to write book reviews for free, so why pay? I would like to get paid for cruising the internet. That would be sweet!


message 47: by EelKat (last edited Jul 10, 2013 06:13PM) (new)

EelKat Christine Allen | 1 comments You can get paid to be an "elder companion" (similar to being a babysitter only you are taking care of a senior instead of a kid). The job varies from person to person, but it is possible to advertise (on Craigslist or SitterCity or Care.com or Care4Hire or some other such place), say you would like to find a senior who is looking for someone to read to them. If you have a large book collection, this is a plus. Typically you will also be expected to cook meals, feed pets, clean house, go shopping, drive to appointments, etc, as well. (Standard pay is $10/hr, but the hours tend to be under 10 a week.) If you want to read only and not do the other stuff, you must specify this in your job wanted listing.

Likewise you can get a job as a reader in most nursing homes (though more often than not it's an unpaid volunteer position).

Babysitters and Nannies also do A LOT of reading - A LOT. All ages like being read to from infants to teens. If you can find a family that puts high value on reading, you could be in for a heavy duty reading job. Do not assume you have to read ONLY picture books to young children! They have huge active imaginations and love being read from novels as well. I have found that with all ages Star Trek novels are a huge hit, and that teen girls love it when you read romance novels to them (makes them feel grown up).

As for how much it pays, that depends on if you are a Sitter, a Nanny, or a Governess, but the pay is always at least minimum wage, which varies by state, but is always at least $7.25 (as per federal law). I don't know where you are, but in Maine min.wage is $7.50 and that is what teenaged on call sitters make.

Adult baby sitters around here earn $10/hr first child and an additional $5/hr/child after that. So 1 child = $10/hr, 2 children = $15/hr, 3 children = $20/hr etc.

Nannies typically earn more than sitters, usually starting at $12 to $15/hr and adding $5/hr/child. So 1 child = $15/hr, 2 children = $20/hr, 3 children = $25/hr etc.This is the same for live in or live out, though live-ins tend to be a combo of nanny/housekeeper and thus get free rent/food/car/health insurance on top of the standard pay, as "extra pay".

Governesses, which are a combination of nanny and tutor, typically start at $30/hr and add $5/hr/child. So 1 child = $30/hr, 2 children = $35/hr, 3 children = $40/hr etc. Like nannies this is the same for live in or live out, though live-ins tend to be a combo of tutor/nanny/housekeeper and thus get free rent/food/car/health insurance on top of the standard pay, as "extra pay".

Another option is reading to groups (children, teens, or seniors) in a library, but that is typically an unpaid volunteer job, unless you are library staff.

Another place to look is animal shelters. Many shelters now have readers on staff. A reader, brings their own book, whatever they want to read, and reads to the cats in a "cat reading room". Again this is usually a volunteer job with no pay, but once in a while you'll find a shelter that pays for this.


I actually just posted a job wanted posting on Craigslist and SitterCity, which stated that I was looking to find a person to read to. I stated that I have done this for children, teens, seniors, and pets, and that I was looking for anyone seeking someone to read to them, their children, their pets, or their elderly parents. I charge $10 an hour for doing this.

In the job listing I wrote:

---- " QUOTE:

"I enjoy reading to children, anything from picture books and Dr. Seuss to Star Trek novels and Harry Potter. I can reread books too, (I know some sitters dislike doing so) so for kids who like to hear Green Eggs and Ham 20 times in a row on end - not a problem. If I know ahead of time a book your child would like to have read to them, I can get it through InterLibraryLoan.


If your child(ren) like Disney comic books, I own hundreds and hundreds of them, including nearly every Donald Duck and Uncle Scrooge ever written. (They are part of a bagged and boarded collection, some issues are nearly 100 years old, and I only let children who are VERY GENTLE handle these, otherwise I read them too them.)


If your kids like Star Trek - I have hundreds of Star Trek novels and never tire of reading about Kirk, Spock, and the rest.


Additionally, if your girl (14+, younger with mom's okay) likes romance novels, I own 800+ romance novels from the 1980s-1990s, including 100+ paranormals, 100+ Barbara Cartlands (sweet, sex-free Victorian teen romances appropriate for girls 10+, younger with mom's okay), 300+ Regencies, and 400+ historicals (Fabio-type Bodice Rippers for readers 16+).


I've also got ALL of InuYasha (manga/Japanese comic AND anime/cartoon DVDs.)


I love to read and get on best with children who love to be read to, especially older preteen/teens who love stories but don't necessarily want to read to themselves. (If your child has reading issues, is behind on reading skills, and needs help in improving their grades in reading/literature or creative writing, this is an area I can help with."


END QUOTE" "-----

There isn't big demand for it, but it's a side income. So far I've done it for a few children, 3 seniors, a dog, and 15 cats.


message 48: by Elaine (new)

Elaine | 14 comments I have a degree in Journalism. It's the perfect degree for readers as you must read constantly to stay informed!!


message 49: by Katie (new)

Katie (SkateandDonate) | 2 comments Of course you can get paid to read books. Making a living off it might be rather tough, but making enough pocket change to buy more books is definitely doable.

You read and write reviews, you can proofread, you can sign up on advertising sites to read and give feedback on advertising emails and countless more.

http://writersweekly.com/this_weeks_a...


message 50: by Kathy (new)

Kathy Hale (kahale) | 208 comments Some magazines or organizations are asking for reviews of books. If you have a particular interest look for a magazine about it and look up about reviewing.


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