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Bobbie57 (bobbie572002) | 901 comments Mild and meek are half bad, but melancholic. Gee, that doesn't sound like fun.


Alias Reader (AliasReader) | 8150 comments A house without books is like a room without windows.

~ Horace Mann


Life of Horace Mann~Mary Tyler Peabody Mann

Horace Mann;: A biography~Jonathan Messerli

http://www25.uua.org/uuhs/duub/articl...

Horace Mann
(May 4, 1796-August 2, 1859), was an educator and a statesman who greatly advanced the cause of universal, free, non-sectarian public schools. Mann also advocated temperance, abolition, hospitals for the mentally ill, and women's rights. His preferred cause was education, about which he remarked that while "other reforms are remedial; education is preventative."


message 353: by Mike (last edited Sep 18, 2010 06:59AM) (new)

Mike (mikesgoodreads) | 294 comments On perspective
Three years sounds like a short amount of time. But it's over a thousand sunrises and sunsets.
-Not really a quote. Just a thought.


message 354: by Jan (new)

Jan | 20 comments The truth is, Goldman went on quickly, women may not vote, they may not love whom they want, they may not develop their minds and their spirits. they may not commit their lives to the spiritual adventure of life"..."is our genius only in our wombs?"

E.L.Doctorow (Ragtime)


message 355: by Alias Reader (last edited Sep 18, 2010 08:03AM) (new)

Alias Reader (AliasReader) | 8150 comments Good one, Jan.


madrano | 815 comments Jan wrote: ""Lord knows how Anne (Bronte) managed to write any books at all, influenced by such a strain of religion as her Aunt Branwell possessed. Emily and Charlotte had the good sense to ignore their bleak..."

It's interesting that Aunt Branwell felt that way because in the Bronte bios i've read she seemed to be a formidable woman. Maybe this is why she didn't marry. In the end she had the pleasure of raising children without the duty of marriage. Hmmm.

deborah


madrano | 815 comments how come youre so afraid of
things that don't make any
sense to you? do people pass
you up on the street all the
time? do cars pass you up on
the highway? how come youre so afraid of things that don't make any sense to you?


from "The Horse Race" from Tarantula by Bob Dylan


Alias Reader (AliasReader) | 8150 comments In the case of good books, the point is not to see how many books you can get through, but rather how many can get through to you !

~ Mortimer J. Adler


Adler's book is excellent. I highly recommend it.

How to Read a Book by Mortimer J. AdlerHow to Read a Book~~Mortimer J. Adler


message 359: by Mike (new)

Mike (mikesgoodreads) | 294 comments Alias Reader wrote: "Adler's book is excellent. I highly recommend it."

I am on it, doggone it! Just put a hold on that at my libraries website. I'm "1 of 1 on 31 copies" and some are not checked out so I ought get it tomorrow, possibly even today. Thanks for the heads up on that, it looks to be a very rewarding read. I am always looking for ways to improve my comprehension skills.

My library has 30 books listed that are authored by Adler...
https://catalog.multcolib.org:443/sea... 


message 360: by Alias Reader (last edited Sep 18, 2010 03:27PM) (new)

Alias Reader (AliasReader) | 8150 comments It really is an excellent book. I own my copy and review it every so often.

Another in that genre is:

The Well-Educated Mind  A Guide to the Classical Education You Never Had by Susan Wise BauerThe Well-Educated Mind: A Guide to the Classical Education You Never Had~ Susan Wise Bauer

I would read Adler's book first than Bauer's book. Though you really need to read both.

I look forward to hearing your thoughts on them.

I'll bet you will end up wanting your own copy of each book as they help you set up your own self study program.

One thing that Bauer recommends is making notes while you read. She explains how. I found this to be quite profitable. A 3 ring binder or a regular notebook is fine for this purpose.

Thanks to Schmurgals, who has notes going back decades, I am once again going to dedicate a notebook to a paragraph or so on each book I read. I had been doing it with my longer notes that I take when reading, but I think a separate book just for this purpose would be better.

A good note taken method is Cornell
http://www.wikihow.com/Take-Cornell-N...


message 361: by Alias Reader (last edited Sep 18, 2010 03:14PM) (new)

Alias Reader (AliasReader) | 8150 comments The Well-Educated Mind: A Guide to the Classical Education You Never Had

First the book tells you how to read and then how to take notes and keep a reading journal.

Then the author tells you how to read each genre. Than it gives you a reading list for each genre.

The book covers:
novels
autobiography / memoirs
History/politics
drama/plays
poetry

Of course both of these books, (Adler & Bauer) are addressing serious reading, not beach reads.


Alias Reader (AliasReader) | 8150 comments We are what we repeatedly do. Excellence, then, is not an act, but a habit.

~ Aristotle



message 363: by Mike (new)

Mike (mikesgoodreads) | 294 comments " Books are the quietest and most constant of friends; they are the most accessible and wisest of counselors, and the most patient of teachers. "
- Charles W. Eliot


message 364: by Mike (new)

Mike (mikesgoodreads) | 294 comments I would never read a book if it were possible for me to talk half an hour with the man who wrote it.
~Woodrow Wilson


madrano | 815 comments Mike wrote: "I would never read a book if it were possible for me to talk half an hour with the man who wrote it.
~Woodrow Wilson"


I fully disagree with Wilson on this one. In fact, many times i've thought i would NEVER want to meet the author of a book i'm reading. My reason is my own insecurity and fear i'd bore the author to tears. Better to read her books & savor them than humiliate myself. BUT, then again, i'm no scholar such as Woodrow Wilson.

deborah


madrano | 815 comments "there is a sign in the hall that reads 'Quiet'--
it waits for no one--I think that is
what makes people different than signs."


Again with the Bob Dylan poetry book, this is from chapter "Ape on Sunday."

deborah


message 367: by J (new)

J (blkdoggy) | 131 comments "But now I have come to believe that the whole world is an enigma, a harmless enigma that is made terrible by our own mad attempt to interpret it as though it had an underlying truth."
Umberto Eco


Alias Reader (AliasReader) | 8150 comments Jorge wrote: ""But now I have come to believe that the whole world is an enigma, a harmless enigma that is made terrible by our own mad attempt to interpret it as though it had an underlying truth."
Umberto Eco"

*****************

I've never read any books by Eco. Your quote made me think I should check him out. Do you have a favorite, Jorge?


Alias Reader (AliasReader) | 8150 comments Just because these habits have a long history, this does not imply that they have a long future.

From:
The Buddhist Path to Simplicity: Spiritual Practice in Everyday Life~ Christina Feldman


message 370: by Mike (new)

Mike (mikesgoodreads) | 294 comments "'Tis the good reader that makes the good book; in every book he finds passages which seem confidences or asides hidden from all else and unmistakenly meant for his ear; the profit of books is according to the sensibility of the reader; the profoundest thought or passion sleeps as in a mine, until it is discovered by an equal mind and heart.

~Ralph Waldo Emerson, Society and Solitude


Bobbie57 (bobbie572002) | 901 comments I read the Name of the Rose by Umberto Eco years ago. It was an interesting book but it did drag in spots for me. I still remember that.

And then he was the speaker at the college graduation of one of my sons. This was at Stony Brook on Long Island. And he was absolutely AWFUL. Didn't seem to know when to stop.


Alias Reader (AliasReader) | 8150 comments Mike wrote: ""'Tis the good reader that makes the good book; in every book he finds passages which seem confidences or asides hidden from all else and unmistakenly meant for his ear; the profit of books is acco..."

----------

I love that quote ! I'm putting it in my jnl.

I also am going to check out Society and Solitude on Amazon.

Thanks !


Alias Reader (AliasReader) | 8150 comments Bobbie57 wrote: "I read the Name of the Rose by Umberto Eco years ago. It was an interesting book but it did drag in spots for me. I still remember that.

And then he was the speaker at the college graduation of ..."

===============

Thanks, Barbara. I think I will take a pass on his books for now.


message 374: by Mike (last edited Sep 23, 2010 06:29PM) (new)

Mike (mikesgoodreads) | 294 comments Alias Reader wrote: "I also am going to check out Society and Solitude on Amazon."

Even the paperbacks are like $15 bucks.
There is a decent quality scanned copy of it here...
http://www.archive.org/details/societ...


message 375: by J (new)

J (blkdoggy) | 131 comments Alias Reader wrote: "Jorge wrote: ""But now I have come to believe that the whole world is an enigma, a harmless enigma that is made terrible by our own mad attempt to interpret it as though it had an underlying truth...."

I also read The name of the rose, years ago. I don't remember whether it was after or before the movie. I remember liking both, the book being better of course. I'm contemplating adding it to my to read list to read it again.


message 376: by madrano (last edited Sep 24, 2010 07:23AM) (new)

madrano | 815 comments Jorge wrote: "Alias Reader wrote: "Jorge wrote: ""But now I have come to believe that the whole world is an enigma, a harmless enigma that is made terrible by our own mad attempt to interpret it as though it had..."

AND

Jorge replied: "I also read The name of the rose, years ago. I don't remember whether it was after or before the movie. I remember liking both, the book being better of course. I'm contemplating adding it to my to read list to read it again.

When i learned that The Name of the Rose had a "Key" which explained the (The Key to The Name of the Rose: Including Translations of All Non-English Passages), i was sure the original would be too tough. However, i felt not.I read The Name of the Rose: Including Postscript and liked it very much. (NOTE: my copy had no postscript but i can't seem to find such a link at GR.) DH liked it enough to follow it up with Umberto Eco's Baudolino, which he enjoyed just as much. Sure, some references in Rose went over my head but the story itself moved me right along. Additionally, Eco's descriptions of architecture, art and books were strong and gave me satisfaction.

deborah


madrano | 815 comments Jorge wrote: ""But now I have come to believe that the whole world is an enigma, a harmless enigma that is made terrible by our own mad attempt to interpret it as though it had an underlying truth."
Umberto Eco"


I forgot to mention in my previous post that i really like this quote and couldn't agree more! Thanks, Jorge.


deborah


message 378: by Alias Reader (last edited Sep 24, 2010 07:42AM) (new)

Alias Reader (AliasReader) | 8150 comments Mike wrote: "Alias Reader wrote: "I also am going to check out Society and Solitude on Amazon."

Even the paperbacks are like $15 bucks.
There is a decent quality scanned copy of it here...
http://www.archive...."

-
-----------------

I have one of his books and it has various selected writing in it. I have to find it and see what's in it. Otherwise I usually use the library.

* edit. I found the book. It's Self-Reliance and other essays. Society and Solitude is not one of the other essays.

I recently read Self-Reliance with a GR classics group. I have to say I don't know if I would have continued reading it without the group. Reading with others helped me understand it a great deal more than I would have on my own.

This is the book I have. I purchased it years ago on Amazon for a few bucks. It was one of those sale items that they always have.
Self Reliance and Other Essays


message 379: by Mike (new)

Mike (mikesgoodreads) | 294 comments Alias Reader wrote: "This is the book I have. I purchased it years ago on Amazon for a few bucks. It was one of those sale items that they always have.
Self Reliance and Other Essays "


All I've ever read of him was the one chapter in Society and Solitude about books. I've not read much non-fiction in my life. So, my 2011 challenge will include some sort of a non-fiction theme and Emerson will be in there for sure.


message 380: by Alias Reader (last edited Sep 24, 2010 10:51AM) (new)

Alias Reader (AliasReader) | 8150 comments Mike wrote:I've not read much non-fiction in my life. So, my 2011 challenge will include some sort of a non-fiction theme and Emerson will be in there for sure.

--------------

My reading tastes have changed over the years. I used to be into legal thrillers and best sellers. Then Oprah sort of pushed me towards more literary fiction. Now, I tend to read a lot of non fiction. History and biographies have really gotten a hold of me.

One of the things I like doing is going back over my reading journal and see how various genres and topics have struck a cord with me.

It's interesting that when I look at Susan Wise Bauer's list for history and biographies, I haven't read a lot of them.

On her history list I've only read

The Great Crash 1929 by John Kenneth GalbraithThe Great Crash 1929~ John Kenneth Galbraith

From her bio/memoir list I've read-
Walden, or Life in the Woods by Henry David ThoreauWalden, or Life in the Woods~ Henry David Thoreau

The Autobiography of Malcolm X  As Told to Alex Haley by Malcolm X~Malcolm X

I thought this book was simply tremendous. You clearly see the arc of his life and how he changes. Fascinating.

Journal of a Solitude by May Sarton~Journal of a Solitude

I plan to re-read this one with Deborah next year.
I also have a few of her other books on my TBR stacks.

Maybe I haven't read that many from her lists as she focus's a bit more on older books. Especially on her history list.


message 381: by Mike (new)

Mike (mikesgoodreads) | 294 comments Alias Reader wrote: "

~Journal of a Solitude

I plan to re-read this one with Deborah next year."


I'd like to read this as well, I'll join in with you two perhaps(?)

The only one of them I don't think I'd care for is the first.


message 382: by Mike (new)

Mike (mikesgoodreads) | 294 comments "A book may lie dormant for fifty years or for two thousand years in a forgotten corner of a library, only to reveal, upon being opened, the marvels or the abysses that it contains, or the line that seems to have been written for me alone." 
~Marguerite Yourcenar from With Open Eyes: Conversations With Matthieu Galey


message 383: by Alias Reader (last edited Sep 24, 2010 03:32PM) (new)

Alias Reader (AliasReader) | 8150 comments Mike wrote: "Alias Reader wrote: "

~Journal of a Solitude

I plan to re-read this one with Deborah next year."

I'd like to read this as well, I'll join in with you two perhaps(?)

The only one of them I don't..."


---------------

Cool ! I'll be interested to hear your thoughts on Bauer's and Adler's list. Adler gives you a 137 book list. I don't think he has any books that were written after the 1950's. And only a few of those.

From his list I've only read

Don Quixote
Tartuffe
Pride and Prejudice
Hard Times
Walden, or Life in the Woods
Crime and Punishment
Anna Karenina
The Magic Mountain

I've read all of the New Testament but only half of the old.

As for Shakespeare, I've read Hamlet, A Midsummer Nights Dream and Macbeth.

Emerson's Self Reliance

In college I did read parts of some of the others on his list, but that doesn't really count.

My list is pretty pathetic, I know. :(


message 384: by Alias Reader (last edited Sep 24, 2010 03:27PM) (new)

Alias Reader (AliasReader) | 8150 comments I found Adler's list on the internet !


Homer (9th Century B.C.?)
Iliad
Odyssey
The Old Testament
Aeschylus (c.525-456 B.C.)
Tragedies
Sophocles (c.495-406 B.C.)
Tragedies
Herodotus (c.484-425 B.C.)
History

Euripides (c.485-406 B.C.)
Tragedies
(esp. Medea, Hippolytus, The Bacchae)
Thucydides (c.460-400 B.C.)
History of the Peloponnesian War

Hippocrates (c.460-377? B.C.)
Medical Writings
Aristophanes (c.448-380 B.C.)
Comedies
(esp. The Clouds, The Birds, The Frogs)
Plato (c.427-347 B.C.)
Dialogues
(esp. The Republic, Symposium, Phaedo, Meno, Apology, Phaedrus, Protagoras, Gorgias, Sophist, Theaetetus)
Aristotle (384-322 B.C.)
Works
(esp. Organon, Physics, Metaphysics, On the Soul, The Nicomachean Ethics, Politics, Rhetoric, Poetics)
Epicurus (c.341-270 B.C.)
Letter to Herodotus
Letter to Menoeceus
Euclid (fl.c. 300 B.C.)
Elements
Archimedes (c.287-212 B.C.)
Works
(esp. On the Equilibrium of Planes, On Floating Bodies, The Sand-Reckoner)
Apollonius of Perga (fl.c.240 B.C.)
Conic Sections
Cicero (106-43 B.C.)
Works
(esp. Orations, On Friendship, On Old Age)
Lucretius (c.95-55 B.C.)
On the Nature of Things
Virgil (70-19 B.C.)
Works
Horace (65-8 B.C.)
Works
(esp. Odes and Epodes, The Art of Poetry)
Livy (59 B.C.-A.D. 17)
History of Rome
Ovid (43 B.C.-A.D. 17)
Works
(esp. Metamorphoses)
Plutarch (c.45-120)
Parallel Lives
Moralia

Tacitus (c.55-117)
Histories
Annals
Agricola
Germania
Nicomachus of Gerasa (fl.c. 100 A.D.)
Introduction to Arithmetic
Epictetus (c.60-120)
Discourses
Encheiridion (Handbook)
Ptolemy (c.100-170; fl. 127-151)
Almagest
Lucian (c.120-c.190)
Works
(esp. The True Way to Write History, The True History, The Sale of Creeds)
Marcus Aurelius (121-180)
Meditations
Galen (c. 130-200)
On the Natural Faculties

The New Testament
Plotinus (205-270)
The Enneads

St. Augustine (354-430)
Works
(esp. On the Teacher, Confessions, City of God, On Christian Doctrine)
The Song of Roland (12th century?)
The Nibelungenlied (13th century?)
(Völsunga Saga is the Scandinavian version of the same legend)

The Saga of Burnt Njal
St. Thomas Aquinas (c.1225-1274)
Summa Theologica
Dante Alighieri (1265-1321)
Works
(esp. The New Life, On Monarchy, The Divine Comedy)
Geoffrey Chaucer (c.1340-1400)
Works
(esp. Troilus and Criseyde, The Canterbury Tales)
Leonardo da Vinci (1452-1519)
Notebooks
Niccolò Machiavelli (1469-1527)
The Prince
Discourses on the First Ten Books of Livy
Desiderius Erasmus (c.1469-1536)
The Praise of Folly
Nicolaus Copernicus (1473-1543)
On the Revolutions of the Heavenly Spheres
Sir Thomas More (c.1478-1535)
Utopia
Martin Luther (1483-1546)
Table Talk
Three Treatises
François Rabelais (c.1495-1553)
Gargantua and Pantagruel
John Calvin (1509-1564)
Institutes of the Christian Religion
Michel de Montaigne (1533-1592)
Essays
William Gilbert (1540-1603)
On the Loadstone and Magnetic Bodies
Miguel de Cervantes (1547-1616)
Don Quixote
Edmund Spenser (c.1552-1599)
Prothalamion
The Faërie Queene
Francis Bacon (1561-1626)
Essays
Advancement of Learning
Novum Organum
New Atlantis
William Shakespeare (1564-1616)
Works
Galileo Galilei (1564-1642)
The Starry Messenger
Dialogues Concerning Two New Sciences
Johannes Kepler (1571-1630)
Epitome of Copernican Astronomy
Concerning the Harmonies of the World
William Harvey (1578-1657)
On the Motion of the Heart and Blood in Animals
On the Circulation of the Blood
On the Generation of Animals
Thomas Hobbes (1588-1679)
The Leviathan
Rene Descartes (1596-1650)
Rules for the Direction of the Mind
Discourse on the Method
Geometry
Meditations on First Philosophy
John Milton (1608-1674)
Works
(esp. the minor poems, Areopagitica, Paradise Lost, Samson Agonistes)
Molière (1622-1673)
Comedies
(esp. The Miser, The School for Wives, The Misanthrope, The Doctor in Spite of Himself)
Blaise Pascal (1623-1662)
The Provincial Letters
Pensees
Scientific Treatises
Christiaan Huygens (1629-1695)
Treatise on Light
Benedict de Spinoza (1632-1677)
Ethics
John Locke (1632-1704)
Letter Concerning Toleration
"Of Civil Government" (second treatise in Two Treatises on Government)
Essay Concerning Human Understanding
Thoughts Concerning Education
Jean Baptiste Racine (1639-1699)
Tragedies
(esp. Andromache, Phaedra)
Isaac Newton (1642-1727)
Mathematical Principles of Natural Philosophy
Optics
Gottfried Wilhelm von Leibniz (1646-1716)
Discourse on Metaphysics
New Essays Concerning Human Understanding
Monadology
Daniel Defoe (1660-1731)
Robinson Crusoe
Jonathan Swift (1667-1745)
A Tale of a Tub
Journal to Stella
Gulliver's Travels
A Modest Proposal
William Congreve (1670-1729)
The Way of the World
George Berkeley (1685-1753)
Principles of Human Knowledge
Alexander Pope (1688-1744)
Essay on Criticism
Rape of the Lock
Essay on Man
Charles de Secondat, Baron de Montesquieu (1689-1755)
Persian Letters
Spirit of Laws
Voltaire (1694-1778)
Letters on the English
Candide
Philosophical Dictionary
Henry Fielding (1707-1754)
Joseph Andrews
Tom Jones
Samuel Johnson (1709-1784)
The Vanity of Human Wishes
Dictionary
Rasselas
The Lives of the Poets (esp. the essays on Milton and Pope)
David Hume (1711-1776)
Treatise on Human Nature
Essays Moral and Political
An Inquiry Concerning Human Understanding
Jean Jaques Rousseau (1712-1778)
On the Origin of Inequality
On the Political Economy
Emile
The Social Contract
Laurence Sterne (1713-1768)
Tristram Shandy
A Sentimental Journey through France and Italy
Adam Smith (1723-1790)
The Theory of Moral Sentiments
Inquiry into the Nature and Causes of the Wealth of Nations
Immanuel Kant (1724-1804)
Critique of Pure Reason
Fundamental Principles of the Metaphysics of Morals
Critique of Practical Reason
The Science of Right
Critique of Judgment
Perpetual Peace
Edward Gibbon (1737-1794)
The Decline and Fall of the Roman Empire
Autobiography
James Boswell (1740-1795)
Journal (esp. London Journal)
Life of Samuel Johnson, Ll.D.
Antoine Laurent Lavoisier (1743-1794)
Elements of Chemistry
John Jay (1745-1829), James Madison (1751-1836), and Alexander Hamilton (1757-1804)
Federalist Papers
(together with the Articles of Confederation, the Constitution of the United States, and the Declaration of Independence)
Jeremy Bentham (1748-1832)
Introduction to the Principles of Morals and Legislation
Theory of Fictions
Johann Wolfgang von Goethe (1749-1832)
Faust
Poetry and Truth
Jean Baptiste Joseph Fourier (1768-1830)
Analytical Theory of Heat
Georg Wilhelm Friedrich Hegel (1770-1831)
Phenomenology of Spirit
Philosophy of Right
Lectures on the Philosophy of History
William Wordsworth (1770-1850)
Poems
(esp. Lyrical Ballads, Lucy poems, sonnets; The Prelude)
Samuel Taylor Coleridge (1772-1834)
Poems
(esp. "Kubla Khan," Rime of the Ancient Mariner)
Biographia Literaria
Jane Austen (1775-1817)
Pride and Prejudice
Emma
Karl von Clausewitz (1780-1831)
On War
Stendhal (1783-1842)
The Red and the Black
The Charterhouse of Parma
On Love
George Gordon, Lord Byron (1788-1824)
Don Juan
Arthur Schopenhauer (1788-1860)
Studies in Pessimism
Michael Faraday (1791-1867)
Chemical History of a Candle
Experimental Researches in Electricity
Charles Lyell (1797-1875)
Principles of Geology
Auguste Comte (1798-1857)
The Positive Philosophy
Honoré de Balzac (1799-1850)
Père Goriot
Eugénie Grandet
Ralph Waldo Emerson (1803-1882)
Representative Men
Essays
Journal
Nathaniel Hawthorne (1804-1864)
The Scarlet Letter
Alexis de Tocqueville (1805-1859)
Democracy in America
John Stuart Mill (1806-1873)
A System of Logic
On Liberty
Representative Government
Utilitarianism
The Subjection of Women
Autobiography
Charles Darwin (1809-1882)
The Origin of Species
The Descent of Man
Autobiography
Charles Dickens (1812-1870)
Works
(esp. Pickwick Papers, David Copperfield, Hard Times)
Claude Bernard (1813-1878)
Introduction to the Study of Experimental Medicine
Henry David Thoreau (1817-1862)
Civil Disobedience
Walden
Karl Marx (1818-1883)
Capital
(together with the Communist Manifesto)
George Eliot (1819-1880)
Adam Bede
Middlemarch
Herman Melville (1819-1891)
Moby Dick
Billy Budd
Fyodor Dostoevsky (1821-1881)
Crime and Punishment
The Idiot
The Brothers Karamazov
Gustave Flaubert (1821-1880)
Madame Bovary
Three Stories
Henrik Ibsen (1828-1906)
Plays
(esp. Hedda Gabler, A Doll's House, The Wild Duck)
Leo Tolstoy (1828-1910)
War and Peace
Anna Karenina
What is Art?
Twenty-Three Tales
Mark Twain (1835-1910)
The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn
The Mysterious Stranger
William James (1842-1910)
The Principles of Psychology
The Varieties of Religious Experience
Pragamatism
Essays in Radical Empiricism
Henry James (1843-1916)
The American
The Ambassadors
Friedrich Wilhelm Nietzsche (1844-1900)
Thus Spoke Zarathustra
Beyond Good and Evil
The Genealogy of Morals
The Will to Power
Jules Henri Poincaré (1854-1912)
Science and Hypothesis
Science and Method
Sigmund Freud (1856-1939)
The Interpretation of Dreams
Introductory Lectures on Psychoanalysis
Civilization and Its Discontents
New Introductory Lectures on Psychoanalysis
George Bernard Shaw (1856-1950)
Plays (and Prefaces)
(esp. Man and Superman, Major Barbara, Caesar and Cleopatra, Pygmalion, Saint Joan)
Max Planck (1858-1947)
Origin and Development of the Quantum Theory
Where Is Science Going?
Scientific Autobiography
Henri Bergson (1859-1941)
Time and Free Will
Matter and Memory
Creative Evolution
The Two Sources of Morality and Religion
John Dewey (1859-1952)
How We Think
Democracy and Education
Experience and Nature
Logic, the Theory of Inquiry
Alfred North Whitehead (1861-1947)
An Introduction to Mathematics
Science and the Modern World
The Aims of Education and Other Essays
Adventures of Ideas
George Santayana (1863-1952)
The Life of Reason
Skepticism and Animal Faith
Persons and Places
Nikolai Lenin (1870-1924)
The State and Revolution
Marcel Proust (1871-1922)
Remembrance of Things Past
Bertrand Russell (1872-1970)
The Problems of Philosophy
The Analysis of Mind
An Inquiry into Meaning and Truth
Human Knowledge: Its Scope and Limits
Thomas Mann (1875-1955)
The Magic Mountain
Joseph and His Brothers
Albert Einstein (1879-1955)
The Meaning of Relativity
On the Method of Theoretical Physics
The Evolution of Physics (with L. Infeld)
James Joyce (1882-1941)
"The Dead" in Dubliners
Portrait of the Artist as a Young Man
Ulysses
Jacques Maritain (1882- )
Art and Scholasticism
The Degrees of Knowledge
The Rights of Man and Natural Law
True Humanism
Franz Kafka (1883-1924)
The Trial
The Castle
Arnold Toynbee (1889- )
A Study of History
Civilization on Trial
Jean Paul Sartre (1905- )
Nausea
No Exit
Being and Nothingness
Aleksandr I. Solzhenitsyn (1918- )
The First Circle
The Cancer Ward

http://www.interleaves.org/~rteeter/g...


message 385: by Mike (new)

Mike (mikesgoodreads) | 294 comments Alias Reader wrote: "I found Adler's list on the internet !


Homer (9th Century B.C.?)
Iliad
Odyssey
The Old Testament
Aeschylus (c.525-456 B.C.)
Tragedies
Sophocles (c.495-406 B.C.)
Tragedies
Herodotus (c.484-425..."


Trippy!!! I was able to pick it up at the library today. I stopped in the park on the way home and the table of contents lead me to this list straight away. I come home, check my email and here it is again! LoL. I've been just skimming through it as of yet but I plan to read the first chapter tonight. One thing I like right off is it's table of contents, very detailed for easy reference.


madrano | 815 comments Mike wrote: ""
4022418 "A book may lie dormant for fifty years or for two thousand years in a forgotten corner of a library, only to reveal, upon being opened, the marvels or the abysses that it contains, or the line that seems to have been written for me alone."
~Marguerite Yourcenar from With Open Eyes: Conversations With Matthieu Galey
..."


Isn't this the truth?! For me it's one of the pleasures of reading recently re-released treasures by authors whose names hold no meaning for me. A couple of examples would be

Margaret Oliphant
Susanna Rowson
and even, about 12 years ago, Anthony Trollope

Gems, all.

This sorta leads me to Alias's comment in post 380:
"Maybe I haven't read that many from her lists as she focus's a bit more on older books. Especially on her history list. "


This was part of the discussion of Bauer's book. I find when books list history books, they become dated fairly quickly. Of course there are some classics, such as The Decline and Fall of the Roman Empire by Edward Gibbon but overall it seems new information or superior writing techniques make those books dated in comparatively short order.

deborah


madrano | 815 comments Mike wrote: "Alias Reader wrote: "I found Adler's list on the internet !


Homer (9th Century B.C.?)
Iliad
Odyssey
The Old Testament
Aeschylus (c.525-456 B.C.)
Tragedies
Sophocles (c.495-406 B.C.)
Tragedies ..."


I've read and enjoyed several of the plays by the ancient Greeks. If you decide to try some, i suggest an edition which offers notes of explanation to gods and practices mentioned in the play. It helps. Not that one can't ferret out much of it but the dimensions of the play widen the more you know about their myths. Having written that, if i own the work, i read it even though they are usually without notes. Rarely do i totally not "get" what occurs but under discussion i realize what i've missed, too. :-)

deborah


message 388: by Mike (new)

Mike (mikesgoodreads) | 294 comments "You may have tangible wealth untold;
Caskets of jewels and coffers of gold.
Richer than I you can never be -
I had a mother who read to me."

~Strickland W. Gillilan

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Strickla...


message 389: by Alias Reader (last edited Sep 25, 2010 07:47AM) (new)

Alias Reader (AliasReader) | 8150 comments Mike wrote: was able to pick it up at the library today. I stopped in the park on the way home and the table of contents lead me to this list straight away. I come home, check my email and here it is again! LoL. I've been just skimming through it as of yet but I plan to read the first chapter tonight. One thing I like right off is it's table of contents, very detailed for easy reference.
----------------

As I noted Adler's book can be a bit stuffy. It was written in the 1940's. Bauer's book was published in 2003. Her book is more contemporary and has an easier to read style.

I think there is a lot to learn from both books. But if you should find Adler too stuffy for your tastes, please don't give up on the topic, try Bauer.


Alias Reader (AliasReader) | 8150 comments I was skimming over my Adler book yesterday.

You could probably skim over the first 4 chapters. He starts in on the reading process in chapter 5.


Alias Reader (AliasReader) | 8150 comments I am going to cross post these Adler/Bauer posts to the New Book Releases & Book Lists Folder. I selected it since there are reading lists in both books,and there is a space for a new thread there. :)

We can continue the conversation there.


message 392: by Alias Reader (last edited Sep 25, 2010 08:23AM) (new)

Alias Reader (AliasReader) | 8150 comments To live fully your - Well Read Life - at any age, it is essential to take your selection of books seriously. When you drift from book to book, you are lulled into thinking that this lack of focus is right and natural. But it's as wrong as can be. Some serendipity in your reading is delightful, but if you wanted to build a house, would you wait for the materials to assemble themselves?

From:


The Little Guide to Your Well-Read Life by Steve LeveenThe Little Guide to Your Well-Read Life~ Steve Leveen


message 393: by Mike (new)

Mike (mikesgoodreads) | 294 comments "Art produces ugly things, which frequently become more beautiful with time. Fashion, on the other hand, produces beautiful things, which always become ugly with time."
~Jean Cocteau


message 394: by Alias Reader (last edited Sep 28, 2010 10:06AM) (new)

Alias Reader (AliasReader) | 8150 comments Simplicity:


The wisdom of life consists in the elimination on of nonessentials.
~ Lin Yutang

Live simply that others might simply live.
~ Gandhi

You have succeeded in life when all you really want is only what you really need.
~ Vernon Howard

We don't need to increase our goods nearly as much as we need to scale down our wants. Not wanting something is as good as possessing it.
~ Donald Horban

Enjoy the little things, for one day you may look back and realize they were the big things.
~ Robert Brault


message 395: by Alias Reader (last edited Sep 28, 2010 10:07AM) (new)

Alias Reader (AliasReader) | 8150 comments Helen Keller


Literature is my Utopia. Here I am not disenfranchised. No barrier of the senses shuts me out from the sweet, gracious discourses of my book friends. They talk to me without embarrassment or awkwardness.
~ Helen Keller

Self-pity is our worst enemy and if we yield to it, we can never do anything good in the world.
~ Helen Keller

I am only one, but still I am one. I cannot do everything, but still I can do something; and because I cannot do everything, I will not refuse to do something that I can do.
~ Helen Keller


http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Helen_Ke...

Helen Adams Keller (June 27, 1880 – June 1, 1968) was an American author, political activist, and lecturer. She was the first deafblind person to earn a Bachelor of Arts degree. The story of how Keller's teacher, Anne Sullivan, broke through the isolation imposed by a near complete lack of language, allowing the girl to blossom as she learned to communicate, has become known worldwide through the dramatic depictions of the play and film The Miracle Worker.

The Story of My Life (Bantam Classic) by Helen KellerThe Story of My Life~Helen Keller

The Miracle Worker by William  GibsonThe Miracle Worker~William Gibson



madrano | 815 comments I read this recently. While it doesn't sing to me today, it did the day i read it. ;-)

Audrey Hepburn--
"Nothing is impossible; the word itself says, 'I'm possible!'"


Kriverbend | 28 comments Alias Reader wrote: " Helen Keller

When my brother graduated from Harvard, my parents and I flew out for the graduation. I came late to the ceremony and had to sit quite a way back on the lawn where it was being held. I couldn't see the people on the stage very well and wondered why the one woman was knitting on the stage. It took a few moments before I realized it was Helen Keller.

Lois



Bobbie57 (bobbie572002) | 901 comments On the same track and from my Buffalo News today --

"In order to attain the impossible, one must attempt the absurd." Miguel de Cervantes born on this date in 1547.

Cervantes was the author of El Cid -- Don Quixote.


Kriverbend | 28 comments Re: My comment about seeing Helen Keller....I should have made it clear that she was not knitting as I first thought. She was conversing with her hands, but I didn't realize it at first. (I really feel dumb about not explaining that!)

Lois


message 400: by Mike (new)

Mike (mikesgoodreads) | 294 comments "Lord! when you sell a man a book you don't sell just twelve ounces of paper and ink and glue - you sell him a whole new life.  Love and friendship and humour and ships at sea by night - there's all heaven and earth in a book, a real book."
  ~Christopher Morley


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