The Book Addicts! discussion

73 views
The Chit Chat Board > Reading Memories

Comments (showing 1-47 of 47) (47 new)    post a comment »
dateDown_arrow    newest »

Emily Hi All!
I was wondering if anyone wants to help me with a project. I looking for fond memories of being read to between the ages of 7 and 13. If you would like to be part of my project, leave you memory (a sentence or two) along with your current age and state. Thanks!


message 2: by Jamie (last edited May 04, 2010 08:16PM) (new)

Jamie  (jaymers8413) I remember my dad reading the Chronicals of Narnia to me when I was little. I would try to go through my clothes in my own closet to get to Narnia but it never worked :(

Age 25, Kentucky


message 3: by Maggie (last edited May 03, 2010 09:35AM) (new)

Maggie | 491 comments I remember The Lion, The Witch and the Wardrobe being read to the class when I was in infant school (probably aged 6-7) - I absolutely loved it. I reckon that's what started my love of reading. My mom bought this little figure of a girl with a bag over her shoulder and reading a book - she said it reminded her of me when I was little - always had a book open.

Age: 50-ish
UK


Kayla | 112 comments My parents never read aloud to me. My first memory of being read to was in 2nd grade (7-8 years old) by my teacher in a reading circle, though I can't remember the books she read. I also remember my 8th grade teacher reading The Outsiders to the class (age 13), which surpisingly I enjoyed. Before that, I believed that being read to would be a less enveloping experience because I wouldn't be able to hear the characters' individual voices (like I hear when reading silently to myself).

Current Age: 20
State: North Carolina


Anna Anderson (AnnaAnderson) | 373 comments My mother would read aloud to my younger brother and myself EVERY night before bed until I was old enough to read on my own and then she would let me read to him with her sitting with us. She started this when I was about 3 years old and I guess it ended when I was at the age of wanting to read on my own, probably 10 maybe. She would let us take turns choosing the books. Now, my brother and I are both AVID readers and we say we owe it all to our mom and dad (if mom was not available, dad would fill in and he loves to read as well).

Age: 36
State: North Carolina


Terri (Brookfield) I remember being read in school
the Cricket in Times square and Charlottes web I did enjoy that very much.


message 7: by LemonLinda (last edited May 03, 2010 11:29AM) (new)

LemonLinda (lwilliamson42353) My mother read to me every day and thus by the time I began first grade I was an advanced reader so between the ages of 7 and 13 I read to myself at home devouring books as much as possible. I remember going to the community library each week during each of the summers and lovingly choosing my books for the week.

I do, however, have a distinctive memory of being read to in the third grade (age 8). My teacher that year was older and had the reputation of terrorizing her young students. I was severely frightened of her, but that lessened somewhat over the year as she read aloud to us daily. And I would always want to get the book and read ahead if I had not yet read that one, but I would never let myself do that so I could enjoy those 30 minutes each day. My favorite that I remember most distinctly was Charlotte's Web. I even remember sitting in class with tears streaming down my face and thinking to myself that other students would think I was strange but I was so moved that I really did not care.

Current age: 53
State: North Carolina


message 8: by Kellyflower (last edited May 03, 2010 11:39AM) (new)

Kellyflower My parents didn't read to me (we were more the TV/movie family), It was the Elementary school librarian, Mrs. Lang, who fascinated me with the stories that came out of books.
We were called for library time once a week and she would sit us down and read a chapter out of a book. She put so much expression in her reading it was fun to listen. The book I remember most was James and the Giant Peach. She did all the voices differently and I still remember her glasses.

age:38
State: North Carolina


Angela Mccartney (txdaisyd) | 8 comments I read amityville when I was in 4th grade. I grew up on a farm with my grandparents we worked farm ourselves no tv out there. The 5th grade I had a crush on my male teacher he read us wrinkle in time. I loved the book ever since


Julie Horner | 39 comments My earliest memory of being read to is was by my Kindergarten teacher. It was absolutely my favorite part of the day. Books were always important in each grade growing up. I can remember we had to read several each year and do projects on them. The main book I can recall is Willie Wonka and the Chocolate Factory in 3rd grade. My teacher loved the projects I did for it. If I remember correctly, we had a worksheet of 25 different things to chose from and I think we had to chose 5 or 6 to do. I created a "wallpaper" that would taste like honey (it had little honey pots all over it). Funny, in senior year of high school, I had a Literature Teacher who used to do the same thing with each book we read. She would come up with "projects" for us to do. Creative, even though we were older. ( I ended up majoring in English Literature in College..that is how much I LOVE to read.)


Daphne (Daphne2163) | 238 comments My two favorite memories were in elementary school. My third grade teacher read Henry and Ribsy to us. I was so enchanted with the characters in that book. It led to a year of reading everything by Beverly Cleary. To this day I still love Beezus! My second favorite memory was of my fourth grade teacher reading The Black Stallion to us. It opened my mind to the fact that I could really enjoy an adventure book that I had previously thought of as a "boy's book".

Current Age: 46
State: New York


Maggie | 800 comments My mother (a college English teacher), knowing that she was not going to get her students to concentrate on anything worthwhile the last class before the Christmas holidays, would read The Grinch Who Stole Christmas to the class. It became a tradition, and was so popular that other students would fill the class SRO, spilling out into the hallway to hear it.


Michelle (In Libris Veritas) (Shadowrose) I remember when I was in Kindergarten we would all go to the library where one of our librarians would let us choose one of the newer books for her to read to us. Then we would all rush to try and sit on and around this really huge Clifford. I fell in love with libraries because of all the stories I heard while sitting on the back of Clifford and one of the last things I did when I left for six grade was go back and just sit there.

Current Age: 19
State: Georgia


message 14: by Mary (Marbear), Founder (new)

Mary (Marbear) Blackburn (mbeth45) | 9161 comments Mod
Hi. I'd have to say the Nancy Drew books. I even read the Hardy Boys books.

46
Missouri


Jill (Jillybeans) | 4474 comments I would ride my bicycle to the library on the day the librarian read a story out loud about 6 years of age. Then I would check out about a dozen books and exchange them on the next storytime day.

50 yrs old
Texas


Emily Thanks for the memories! they are really fun to read :)


Amy (blueeyes11283) My mom read to me when I was about 4 or 5, and after I learned how to do it on my own, I wanted to read it myself. I remember reading the baby-sitters club when I was about 8 or 9, and after that of course came Goosebumps, Fear Street series (both by R.L.Stine) and Nancy Drew. I was a HUGE Nancy Drew Fan, and still have all of the ones I read.


Age:27 Location:Iuka, MS


Christopher H. (christopher_h) My father read to my three brothers and my sister pretty much solidly through our childhood. I remember him reading the Narnia Chronicles, The Hobbit, The Lord of the Rings. Then it was time for us to start reading on our own. I read all of The Hardy Boys, The Nancy Drews, and then a whole host of YA classics, like Robinson Crusoe, Kidnapped, Treasure Island, etc.

I carried the tradition on with my own kids, and it paid off handsomely. My daughters are all avid readers, and the oldest is completing her Ph.D. in English at the University of Nebraska-Lincoln! We are quite the 'bookish' family! ;-) Cheers! Chris


Maryann (Maryannwrites) | 42 comments My third grade teacher introduced me to the joy of books and stories. She read to us every day, and had an extensive "library" in the classroom. When we finished an assignment, we could take a book to read. I still remember her so many years later. Her name was Mrs. Henderson.


message 20: by Mary (Marbear), Founder (new)

Mary (Marbear) Blackburn (mbeth45) | 9161 comments Mod
I've enjoyed reading everyone's stories. This was a great idea.

marbear


Maryann (Maryannwrites) | 42 comments I agree marbear. This has been fun.


Scout (goodreadscomscout) Mrs. Henderson, my third grade teacher (what a coincidence, Maryann), taught me long division (painful) and read a chapter a day of The Littles by John Peterson (delightful). The Littles were small people who lived in the walls of a family called the Biggs and were threatened by mice and cats. I imagine it was much like earlier generations listening to serials on the radio. We couldn't wait for the next installment.

I'm 55, and I live in Georgia (U.S.).


LynnB Scout wrote: "Mrs. Henderson, my third grade teacher (what a coincidence, Maryann), taught me long division (painful) and read a chapter a day of The Littles by John Peterson (delightful). The Littles were smal..."

Oh, I had forgotten all about The Littles! I used to love those stories!


Maryann (Maryannwrites) | 42 comments That is quite a coincidence. Memorable teachers for both of us. As a postscript to my story about my Mrs. Henderson. When I was in the hospital in labor for my first child, the woman in the bed next to me had a visitor who looked very familiar. I finally asked if she was perhaps Mrs. Henderson, and it was. I was able to tell her what a great influence she had on me. What a thrill for both of us.


Julie S. Oh my gosh, I remember the Littles now. They were amazing.

At around age 8, I was reading one of the Bailey School kids book (those books where the kids think that their teachers are mythical creatures for example Leprechauns Don't Play Basketball). That was one of the first books that I visually saw in my mind. In fact, I put down the book and got up to get a drink. When I came back into the room, I wondered what TV show I had been watching. Then I realized that I was not watching a TV show but I was "watching" something much better. That was an exciting moment for me.


Jess Michaelangelo Oh, I loved being read to in school.

I was always an avid reader, but I have specific memories associated with being read to in school. I remember in third grade (I was 9), my reading teacher has this plush round carpet that the class would gather onto as she read to us. My classmates didn't like my teacher, but I loved her just for reading to us. My favorite book was A Cricket in Times Square. Then, in fourth grade (age 10), my teacher read us Indian in the Cupboard. In fifth grade (11), we were read The Lion, The Witch, and The Wardrobe and Bridge to Terabithia. It was a great year!

Current age: 20
State: PA


Elizabeth (Lilbet) | 31 comments Mrs. McCall, my third grade teacher, read Brighty of the Grand Canyon and Farmer Boy to us. I can still remember those blissful minutes after lunch/recess when we'd sleepily get to regroup to Daisy McCall (yep, that was her real name) reading to us. It's hard for me to even call her Daisy without looking over my shoulder for her shadow! Anyway, Mrs. McCall had the best reading style. She could make the food scenes in Farmer Boy make even our post delicious homemade school lunch tummies growl. (Yep, I grew up in a small town where the lunch ladies made real food!) I can still see her standing in front of our classroom, always in a polyester dress with her matching sensible shoes, hankerchief tucked in her sleeve, holding the book aloft. There was no sitting down for Daisy! From time to time, she would wipe her nose or lips. Later, when I would read to my own imaginary class in my bedroom schoolroom, I would tuck a Kleenex in my sleeve and do my best to immitate her voice and reading style. Pure delight.

Another brief memory is of my elementary school librarian, Mrs. Harwig. Yep, you had to have an appropriate teacher-like name to get hired in my district (the music teacher was Mrs. Applewick!). She would read to us as we would fight over who got to sit in the "whistle" chairs. Anyone else have them? They were 1970s pure cool, with slippery upholstery that you'd slide down. Mrs. Harwig always seemed constipated and crabby, but when she read to us her whole being lit up.


Monica (Imelda85) I remember my mom reading to my brother and I every morning even before I started going to kindergarten! She read to us The Secret Garden and some of the Laura Ingalls Wilder series.

I also remember reading to my parents before I went to bed at five years old!


Afsana (afsanaz) Maryann wrote: "That is quite a coincidence. Memorable teachers for both of us. As a postscript to my story about my Mrs. Henderson. When I was in the hospital in labor for my first child, the woman in the bed nex..."

u sure its not the same henderaon 2 third grade teachers with same name?


DJ  (DJDivaofJava) | 2985 comments The best teacher I never had was Called Mrs Henderson.I was due to go into her class but the school "retired" her to save a younger teachers job.Mrs H was a born teacher, she made verything interesting and always had time for any of the children in he school and always made herself available for any projects that we wanted to do outwith school.She really was such a special person...
I still have a shal hat she brought me back from Russia'I keep it in a box with all my Great Aunt Megs Silk Scarves and I love when I come acoss it.I always stop to remmber her.
I would like to way a Huge Thank You to all the Mrs Hendersons in our world....


Afsana (afsanaz) DJ wrote: "The best teacher I never had was Called Mrs Henderson.I was due to go into her class but the school "retired" her to save a younger teachers job.Mrs H was a born teacher, she made verything interes..."

maybe to be a great teacher you need to be called mrs henderson?

How cme she got you a hat when she never taught you? only you?


DJ  (DJDivaofJava) | 2985 comments Afsana wrote: "DJ wrote: "The best teacher I never had was Called Mrs Henderson.I was due to go into her class but the school "retired" her to save a younger teachers job.Mrs H was a born teacher, she made veryt..."

I think there must be something in the name Mrs Henderson that just goes wih being a really great teacher...
Sorry that was a typo it should have read " shawl that" my typing is WOOO bad just now.To answer your question she livedstreet as us and I spent a lot of time in the hospital as a child which was really great for my education as I got so much on on one teaching that I flew ahead of my class mates hnce probably my intense love of authors like Dumas as Iwas not constrained to the class schedule but I always found it very difficult to come back o lessons hat were by that time a couple of years behind where I as, it was not a great catchmnt area and so as a teacher Mrs H really stood out from the re.she really understood how difficult it was fo me to ber integrating not only wih my classmates (who were pretty rough) Bu also bong dragged back to work hat I found repetitive and boring as I had already done it .....
It could cause me to be very introvertd and even now I do not regard myself a people person no mattr what Husband says.I guess it was her way of reminding me of all the adventures that there were going to be ahead for me to look forward to.....


Jacqueline Bartelmo (Missjackieann) | 15 comments My grandmother used to read Trumpet of the Swan, Charlotte's Web, and Classic fairy tale stories to me. I still have the books she would read me and I still read them to this day.


Yorky Caz (YorkyCaz) | 2186 comments I remember our English teacher was widely classed as a bit out there and not just because of his love of sitting cross legged on the desk or wearing really bad outfits but he is memorable because we actually joined in with enthusiam his classes, I still have a memory of a word game he was playing which involved everyone writing on a massive peice of paper and all the other teachers coming in to see and standing round talking saying they had no idea what purpose this served but how amazed they were at our enthusiam in the class!!


Maryann (Maryannwrites) | 42 comments Afsana wrote: "DJ wrote: "The best teacher I never had was Called Mrs Henderson.I was due to go into her class but the school "retired" her to save a younger teachers job.Mrs H was a born teacher, she made veryt..."

It is so cool that so many of us were touched by a special teacher named Mrs. Henderson. Maybe the originale was cloned. LOL


DJ  (DJDivaofJava) | 2985 comments Maryann wrote: "Afsana wrote: "DJ wrote: "The best teacher I never had was Called Mrs Henderson.I was due to go into her class but the school "retired" her to save a younger teachers job.Mrs H was a born teacher,..."

That would have been cool.Seriously my Mrs Henderson was such a characte that I think it ould have been well nigh impossible to clone her and do her justice!
Fabulous thought though....


Maryann (Maryannwrites) | 42 comments I think good teachers are so special that we remember their names forever. I have friends who can also name some of their teachers even after many years.


Christopher H. (christopher_h) Well...we can also remember very BAD teachers too! I had a teacher in a tiny town in south-eastern Montana who swore that Admiral Byrd wrote the 'Star Spangled Banner.' My father, a teacher too (high school) tried to set her straight on that, but she refused to budge. Consequently, I repeated the 4th grade. I didn't forgive her for nearly 52 years (I'm 54 now). She was an absolute disaster, and shouldn't have been allowed within 250 miles of anyone under the age of 40. She had a big bouffant beehive like Marge Simpson...Come to think of it, I think it was blue too! Ahh, Mrs. Burns...


Scout (goodreadscomscout) DJ and Maryann, my Mrs. Henderson lived in South Georgia. Any chance at all that she's the same one?


Scout (goodreadscomscout) Christopher, not many things worse than a mean-spirited teacher.


DJ  (DJDivaofJava) | 2985 comments Scout wrote: "DJ and Maryann, my Mrs. Henderson lived in South Georgia. Any chance at all that she's the same one?"

Not in my case Renfrewshire Scotland....She deserved to teach in a better area where she would have been more appreciated!


Jill (Jillybeans) | 4474 comments Christopher, unfortunately, when we were kids, teaching was one of the few professions acceptable for women. So rather than a calling or love of children, you had women teaching as a necessity. A lot of unsuitable characters ended up in the last place they should be: affecting the youth of America. One of my grandmothers was a mean alcoholic and schizophrenic. I shudder to think how she treated her kids. She didn't like them. Not even her own.

Thankfully, there were the enspiring teachers to offset them. I think I would have had to appeal failing a grade based on a teacher's retribution.


Christopher H. (christopher_h) Jill wrote: "Christopher, unfortunately, when we were kids, teaching was one of the few professions acceptable for women. So rather than a calling or love of children, you had women teaching as a necessity. A..."

Oh, the teacher didn't hold me back, my parents did. The woman had filled me (the whole class) with such bunk that my parents believed it was better for me to repeat the 4th grade with a competent teacher. I believe they were right. I was really kind of kidding in my comment, above, about holding a grudge for that. ;-)


Jill (Jillybeans) | 4474 comments ahhhhh. I'm too literal sometimes...


ErinBeth | 350 comments When I was in fifth grade, we had a program at school where we were each buddied up with a younger child (like 1st or 2nd grade), and we each got a book to share with them, wrapped the book up, and had them open it, and then read it together. I can't remember if they read it out loud or if we did, but I remember the book I picked out was a Curious George book, and it was my first time picking out a book for someone else.


Michelle (In Libris Veritas) (Shadowrose) Erin_88888888 wrote: "When I was in fifth grade, we had a program at school where we were each buddied up with a younger child (like 1st or 2nd grade), and we each got a book to share with them, wrapped the book up, and..."

Oh me too! Reading Buddies was very fun. I don't really remember who mine where when I was the younger of the two but I do remember my 5th grade buddy. He looked like my older brother did when he was in kindergarten. We'd take turns reading, sometimes I read from a bigger book for him and then he would pick something out to read to me. I really enjoyed it.


Anna Anderson (AnnaAnderson) | 373 comments I commented earlier on my reading memories, but I forgot to mention how much I use to love when authors would visit our school and when we would have Book Fairs. Eric Carle, Syd Hoff, Robert Quackenbush, etc. visited my elementary school and I am fortunate enough to still have the autographed books and pictures they drew for me. I loved the Book Fairs b/c that is my first memory of spending money on books and getting to pick out which ones I really wanted and not having to share with my little brother! Just wanted to share a few more memories!


back to top

unread topics | mark unread


Books mentioned in this topic

Charlotte's Web (other topics)
Henry and Ribsy (other topics)
The Black Stallion (other topics)
The Secret Garden (other topics)