THE WORLD WAR TWO GROUP discussion

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BOOK DISCUSSIONS > So, What Are You Reading?

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message 201: by Dr. Michael (last edited Apr 16, 2010 07:38PM) (new)

 Dr. Michael Galvin (DrGalvin) | 134 comments Alex, I have not read Day Of Deceit but John Toland wrote a good book back in 1982 regarding this same subject. Infamy: Pearl Harbor And it's Aftermath.


message 202: by 'Aussie Rick', Moderator (new)

'Aussie Rick' (AussieRick) | 7150 comments Matt wrote: "Aussie Rick,

One of the best books on destroyers and kamikazes out there. How Becton describes the bridge overheads (ceilings) were designed is priceless. I had the pleasure being onboard the ..."


Hi Matt,

Couldn't agree more with you, this book is a gem and a great story of bravery.


message 203: by Matt (new)

Matt | 9 comments Aussie Rick,

Another one almost as good as Becton's book is Lott's Brave Ship Brave Men about the U.S.S. Aaron Ward DM-34 Brave Ship Brave Men Brave Ship Brave Men (Blue Jacket Books) by Arnold S. Lott


message 204: by 'Aussie Rick', Moderator (new)

'Aussie Rick' (AussieRick) | 7150 comments Hi Matt, thanks for the suggestion, I will try and check that book out first chance I get.


message 205: by Matt (new)

Matt | 9 comments Aussie Rick ,
No problem. Hope you enjoy


message 206: by carl (new)

carl  theaker | 899 comments B-24 Combat Missions by Martin Bowman

Friend of mine, who was a B-24 pilot, just lent me this book, so I'll be taking a look.

Sub-title says 'European Theater', format is short stories with glossy photos.


message 207: by Dr. Michael (new)

 Dr. Michael Galvin (DrGalvin) | 134 comments I've just started Inferno: The Epic Life & Death Struggle of the USS Franklin in WWII by Joseph Springer thanks to Matt Anderson's recommendation.


message 208: by carl (new)

carl  theaker | 899 comments Dr. Michael wrote: "I've just started Inferno: The Epic Life & Death Struggle of the USS Franklin in WWII by Joseph Springer thanks to Matt Anderson's recommendation."

Though this is Goodreads are we allowed to mention movies?

'Task Force' a '49 flic w/Gary Cooper uses footage of the kamikazi
attacks on the USS Franklin (which is not identified but you'll
get the idea) in the grand finale toward the end.


message 209: by Dr. Michael (last edited Apr 27, 2010 05:37PM) (new)

 Dr. Michael Galvin (DrGalvin) | 134 comments sure, movies are welcome as far as I'm concerned. Thanks for that insight. I've never seen that film.


message 210: by Dr. Michael (new)

 Dr. Michael Galvin (DrGalvin) | 134 comments YEAH, IT IS.


message 211: by 'Aussie Rick', Moderator (new)

'Aussie Rick' (AussieRick) | 7150 comments One of the best Pacific War memoirs along with "With the Old Breed".

With the Old Breed  At Peleliu and Okinawa by E.B. Sledge by E.B. Sledge


message 212: by Dr. Michael (new)

 Dr. Michael Galvin (DrGalvin) | 134 comments I agree. Sledges book is the best Pacific memoir I've read. I had written on facebook: Want to know what war was like in the Pacific during WWII? Here it is in all it's horror and gore. You can almost smell it coming off the pages. How anyone lived thru the Pacific war without losing his mind is beyond me.


message 213: by 'Aussie Rick', Moderator (new)

'Aussie Rick' (AussieRick) | 7150 comments Hi Dr. Michael, totally agree, I don't know how the guys who served in the Pacific Theatre kept themselves sane. When you read about the terrible nature of the fighting that only got worse as the Allies edged closer to Japan its amazing that the men stuck it out.


message 214: by Allan (new)

Allan | 50 comments Yes to what everyone here has said about Sledge. Manchester is good, but much of his book is really padding; he is at his best when he talks about what he saw and experienced personally. But Sledge is excellent throughout, because he sticks to his personal experience. He is a straightforward, unpretentious writer, and he never attempts to be fancy or literary. One of the many remarkable things about Sledge's story is that while he is and remains a patriotic man who loves the Marines and believes in God, he also shows how truly awful war is and how it nearly drove him to the brink of insanity. Such honesty and clarity are very rare. And yes, much of what he describes is still disgusting and shocking even today, when we have come to view Tarantino-style violence as entertainment. I used this book in my class, and I think it made an impression on some of my students. I certainly hope it did. I had a couple of students who were heading towards careers in the military, and I kept telling them that if they weren't ready to face what Sledge faced then they needed to think again about their career choice.


message 215: by Patricrk (new)

Patricrk patrick | 79 comments I'm a couple of hundred pages into Atomic  The First War of Physics and the Secret History of the Atom Bomb 1939-49 by Jim BaggottJim Baggott. Very readable and deals (so far) with the science behind the bomb and the personalities of the men who did the science.


message 216: by Dr. Michael (new)

 Dr. Michael Galvin (DrGalvin) | 134 comments Allan, I agree with you on Manchester's book. I thought it was pretty good until I read Sledges's book but that blows Manchester right out of the water.


message 217: by Sdoconnor (new)

Sdoconnor | 31 comments Hi, I was wondering if anyone knew about any books concerning the North African campaign. So far I have only been able to find Rick Atkinson's An Army At Dawn and a couple of others. Could anyone help me out?


message 218: by 'Aussie Rick', Moderator (last edited May 17, 2010 10:31PM) (new)

'Aussie Rick' (AussieRick) | 7150 comments Hi Sdoconnor, what period are you looking for. There are quite a few covering specific battles, armies or personalities. Some good general and recent histories are; "Together We Stand: North Africa 1942-1943: Turning the Tide in the West" by James Holland.

Together We Stand by James Holland by James Holland
Publishers blurb:
From the bestselling author of Fortress Malta this is the second book in the Mediterranean war trilogy. This book looks afresh at the conflict in Northern Africa, focusing for the first time on the involvement of the US and the way this early collaboration to defeat shaped the whole Anglo-American axis for the rest of the war in Europe. By June 1942, Britain had reached her lowest ebb. Her military command was in tatters, her armies beaten, and in the Middle East it seemed all might be lost. Her new ally, America, had only fledgling armed forces and was severely under-trained, yet it was this alliance of the weary combatant and naive newcomer, coming together for the first time in North Africa, that would eventually bring about the defeat of Nazi Germany. This crucial period -- from defeat at Gazala through to the victories of Alamein and, ultimately, Tunisia -- was a time of learning for the Allies. Yet by the end Britain and America had finally gained material and certain tactical advantages over Germany, particularly in air warfare. As this book shows, the development of a tactical air force -- principles that are still used to this day -- were founded over the skies of North Africa. When the Axis forces were finally driven from North Africa in May 1943, over 250,000 Axis troops were taken prisoner, more than had surrendered to the Russians at Stalingrad. It was a major victory and a crucial steppingstone to the future invasion of Italy and France. In this new reappraisal, James Holland interweaves the personal stories of the men -- and women -- who made up these polyglot Allied forces: British and American, Nepalese and Punjabi, South African and Australian, Maori and Zulu, from all ranks and all services. From the heat and dust of the Western Desert to the mud and mountains of Northern Tunisia, this book charts the extraordinary first days of an Alliance that has worked together ever since.

Or another is; "Alamein: War without Hate" by John Bierman & Colin Smith.
Alamein by John Bierman by John Bierman
Publisher blurb:
The Battle of Alamein was one of the greatest set-piece battles in World War II and the victory for the allied troops was the turning point in the fortunes of war. Within a year of the battle Mussolini had been toppled and the Anglo-American forces had established a firm presence in Italy. The battle was of particular interest as it was a "clean" war. Bitterly fought on both sides according to certain basic ideas of what those involved were not ashamed to call "chivalry", the duel between to remarkable leaders - Rommel and Montgomery - is at the heart of this book. Both had fought and been wounded in World War I, both were personally austere and both had remarkable presence and powers of leadership with their respective troops.


message 219: by 'Aussie Rick', Moderator (new)

'Aussie Rick' (AussieRick) | 7150 comments Hi again Sdoconnor, from the German perspective there are two new books on the African Campaign plus one older one:

Foxes of the Desert  The Story of the Afrikakorps (Luftwaffe Profile Series) by Paul Carell by Paul Carell

Das Afrika Korps  Erwin Rommel and the Germans in Africa, 1941-43 by Franz Kurowski by Franz Kurowski

Rommel's Desert War  Waging World War II in North Africa, 1941-1943 (Cambridge Military Histories) by Martin Kitchen by Martin Kitchen


message 220: by Dr. Michael (last edited May 17, 2010 09:22AM) (new)

 Dr. Michael Galvin (DrGalvin) | 134 comments Just finished Inferno: The Epic Life & Death Struggle of the USS Franklin In WWII by Joseph Springer. An outstanding read and worthy of the 5 star Amazon rating.
Now reading Intrepid: The Epic Story Of America's Most Legendary Warship by Bill White and Robert Gandt. Not sure Intrepid is the most legendary but the first 60 pages have certainly grabbed my attention.


message 221: by carl (new)

carl  theaker | 899 comments Embattled Dreams  California in War and Peace, 1940-1950 (Americans and the California Dream) by Kevin Starr

More of a Home Front book, been reading a series on the history of California and got to this decade and thought, mmm, this fits the WW2 genre.

A lot of topics: about everyone going to the Pacific passed through, Japanese internment, movie stars going to war, aircraft production, fears of Japanese invasion, etc.


message 222: by Allan (new)

Allan | 50 comments Sdoconnor wrote: "Hi, I was wondering if anyone knew about any books concerning the North African campaign. So far I have only been able to find Rick Atkinson's An Army At Dawn and a couple of others. Could anyone h..."

There are thousands of North African books, many of which will be found in Atkinson's bibliography. Here are some good ones I have read and used:
Michael Carver, 'Alamein' and 'Tobruk.'
C.E. Lucas Phillips, 'Alamein.'
Kenneth Macksey, 'Afrika Korps' and 'Beda Fomm.'
Mark Johnston and Peter Stanley, 'Alamein, the Australian Story.'
Gregory Blaxland, 'The Plain Cook and the Great Showman.'
Niall Barr, 'The Pendulum of War.'
Martin Blumenson,'Kasserine Pass.'
Alan Moorehead, 'African Trilogy.'
Spike Milligan, 'Rommel? Gunner Who?'
Bob Crisp, 'Brazen Chariots.'
Corelli Barnett, 'The Desert Generals,' is controversial but essential.
The British, French, American, New Zealand, Australian, and South African official histories, if you are really addicted. All are good, as is the US Army 'green book' on Torch and Tunisia.

It wasn't a war without hate, though. Civillians lived in North Africa, including Jews. Even while they were running for their lives after Alamein, the Germans had time enough to desecrate the Jewish cemetery in Tobruk. In Tunisia, the Germans robbed the Jews of their valuables, used them for forced labor in combat zones, and deported some of their leaders to Auschwitz. You won't hear that in most histories of the North African war, but it happened.


message 223: by Allan (new)

Allan | 50 comments 'Aussie Rick' wrote: "Hi Sdoconnor, what period are you looking for. There are quite a few covering specific battles, armies of personalities. Some good general and recent histories are; "Together We Stand: North Africa..."
No war is 'clean.'


message 224: by Nick (last edited May 18, 2010 06:25AM) (new)

Nick | 73 comments American SamuraiMyth and Imagination in the Conduct of Battle in the First Marine Division 1941-1951 by Craig Cameron.

Don't let the title fool you. This is very readable and extremely interesting. If you have been watching the HBO series The Pacific or are just interested in the Pacific Theater, in general, you will fill find this very interesting and a little provocative.


message 225: by Sdoconnor (new)

Sdoconnor | 31 comments Thanks Aussie Rick and thanks Allan. All of these were of great help. As for your question Aussie Rick, I want to learn about the North African campaign in it entirety from both the Allies perspective and actions as well as the Axis' perspective and actions. So thanks for showing me books from both sides. I do not have much knowledge about the North African campaign and hope to broaden it further. Thanks again Allan for that list of books. Both of you helped me out a lot.


message 226: by 'Aussie Rick', Moderator (new)

'Aussie Rick' (AussieRick) | 7150 comments Hi Sdoconnor, glad I could assist, I hope that you enjoy whichever books you decide to read.


message 227: by 'Aussie Rick', Moderator (new)

'Aussie Rick' (AussieRick) | 7150 comments I've just started a new book on the Burma campaign; "Road of Bones: The Siege of Kohima 1944 - The Epic Story of the Last Great Stand of Empire" by Fergal Keane.

Road of Bones  The Siege of Kohima 1944 - The Epic Story of the Last Great Stand of Empire by Fergal Keane by Fergal Keane
Publishers blurb:
The epic story of one of the most savage battles of the Second World War.
Kohima. In this remote Indian village near the border with Burma, a tiny force of British and Indian troops faced the might of the Imperial Japanese Army. Outnumbered ten to one, the defenders fought the Japanese hand to hand in a battle that was amongst the most savage in modern warfare.
A garrison of no more than 1,500 fighting men, desperately short of water and with the wounded compelled to lie in the open, faced a force of 15,000 Japanese. They held the pass and prevented a Japanese victory that would have proved disastrous for the British. Another six weeks of bitter fighting followed as British and Indian reinforcements strove to drive the enemy out of India. When the battle was over, a Japanese army that had invaded India on a mission of imperial conquest had suffered the worst defeat in its history. Thousands of men lay dead on a devastated landscape, while tens of thousands more Japanese starved in a catastrophic retreat eastwards. They called the journey back to Burma the ‘Road of Bones’, as friends and comrades committed suicide or dropped dead from hunger along the jungle paths.


message 228: by Patricrk (new)

Patricrk patrick | 79 comments Just Starting The Legacy of the Second World War by John Lukacs John LukacsJohn Lukacs


message 229: by Dr. Michael (new)

 Dr. Michael Galvin (DrGalvin) | 134 comments Just finished Intrepid:The Epic Story Of America's Most Legendary Warship by Bill White & Robert Gandt. As enlightening and fascinating as Inferno: The Epic Life & Death Struggle Of The USS Franklin by Joseph Springer.
Now reading Islands Of the Damned: A Marine At War In The Pacific by R.V. Burgin who was in the mortar crew with Eugene Sledge and Merriel "Snafu" Shelton.


message 230: by 'Aussie Rick', Moderator (new)

'Aussie Rick' (AussieRick) | 7150 comments I've got a copy of "Islands of the Damned" sitting un-read in my library so I will be interested to hear your views on the book once you have finished it.


message 231: by Michael, Assisting Moderator Axis Forces (new)

Michael Flanagan (Loboz) | 282 comments I am currently reading Weapons of Choice by John Birmingham. It's the first fiction book I have read in years, loving the concept behind this novel.


message 232: by Dr. Michael (new)

 Dr. Michael Galvin (DrGalvin) | 134 comments Finished Islands Of The Damned by R.V. Burgin. I thought it was quite good. Like it a lot more than Leckie's Helmet For My Pillow. Very similar to Sledge's With The Old Breed. Sledge's is the better of the two but Burgin's is a good companion to With The Old Breed.
I've just started A Company Of Heros by Marcus Brotherton and I've preordered You'll Be Soo-ree by Sid Phillips


message 233: by 'Aussie Rick', Moderator (new)

'Aussie Rick' (AussieRick) | 7150 comments I've just started James Holland's latest book; "The Battle of Britain".


The Battle of Britain by James Holland by James Holland

Publishers blurb:
'If Hitler fails to invade or destroy Britain, he has lost the war,' Churchill said in the summer of 1940. He was right. "The Battle of Britain" was a crucial turning point in the history of the Second World War. Had Britain's defences collapsed, Hitler would have dominated all of Europe and been able to turn his full attention east to the Soviet Union. The German invasion of France and the Low Countries in May 1940 was unlike any the world had ever seen. It hit with a force and aggression that no-one could counter and in just a few short weeks, all in their way crumbled under the force of the Nazi hammer blow. With France facing defeat and with British forces pressed back to the Channel, there were few who believed Britain could possibly survive. Soon, it seemed, Hitler would have all of Europe at his feet. Yet Hitler's forces were not quite the Goliath they at first seemed, while her leadership lacked the single-minded purpose, vision and direction that had led to such success on land. Nor was Britain any David. Thanks to a sophisticated defensive system and the combined efforts of the RAF, Royal Navy as well as the mounting sense of collective defiance led by a new Prime Minister, Britain was not ready to roll over just yet. From clashes between coastal convoys and Schnellboote in the Channel to astonishing last stands in Flanders, and from the slaughter by the U-boats in the icy Atlantic to the dramatic aerial battles over England, "The Battle of Britain" tells this most epic of stories from all sides, drawing on extensive new research from around the world. In so doing, it paints a complete picture of that extraordinary summer - a time in which the fate of the world truly hung by a thread.


message 234: by carl (new)

carl  theaker | 899 comments The publisher's blurb reads like the intro to a
big time wrestling match- some truth and we hope
you believe the rest!

I'm sure the book is better, they gotta get you
in the door first.


message 235: by 'Aussie Rick', Moderator (new)

'Aussie Rick' (AussieRick) | 7150 comments Hi Carl,
So far it isn't too bad. I have read the author's previous books and they have all been pretty decent so they didn't need to try hard to sell this book to me :)


message 236: by Michael, Assisting Moderator Axis Forces (last edited Jun 04, 2010 04:25PM) (new)

Michael Flanagan (Loboz) | 282 comments I am about to start The Wild Blue: The Men and Boys Who Flew the B-24s Over Germany by Stephen E Ambrose. Should help me through another night shift.

The Wild Blue  The Men and Boys Who Flew the B-24s Over Germany by Stephen E. Ambrose


message 237: by Dr. Michael (new)

 Dr. Michael Galvin (DrGalvin) | 134 comments I was disappointed with this book. After reading D Day, Citizen Soldiers, Band Of Brothers and Pegasus Bridge this book (Wild Blue) did not live up to it's predecessors. More a story of Sen. George McGovern's exploits as a B-24 pilot than "the men who flew the B-24". If you'd like a much better book try Donald Miller's Masters Of The Air.


message 238: by 'Aussie Rick', Moderator (new)

'Aussie Rick' (AussieRick) | 7150 comments I was also felt let down by Ambrose's "The Wild Blue" but it is still only one of few books offering accounts of those airmen flying the B-24 instead of the B-17. Two books I really enjoyed about the United States involvment in the air war over Europe were:

The Mighty Eighth  The Air War in Europe as Told by the Men Who Fought It by Gerald Astor by Gerald Astor
Publishers blurb:
In 1941 the RAF fought a desperate battle of survival against the Luftwaffe over Britain. Then, from across the Atlantic, came a new generation of American pilots, gunners, and bombardiers, a new generation of flying machines called the B-17 Flying Fortress, the B-24 Liberator, the P-47 Thunderbolt, and the P-51 Mustang fighter. Soon these brave young men were hurtling themselves and their unproven planes across the Channel and into the teeth of enemy firepower, raining down bombs on the German military machine, and going up against Hitler's best fliers in the sky.
This is the dramatic oral history of the Army Air Corps and the newly created Eighth Air Force stationed in Britain, an army of hard-fighting, hard-playing flying men who suffered more fatalities than the entire U.S. Marine Corps in the Pacific campaign of World War II. Here, in their own words, are tales of survival and soul-numbing loss, of soldiers who came together to fight a kind of war that had never been fought before--and win it with their courage and their blood.
But the road to victory was paved with sacrifice. From its inaugural mission on July 4, 1942, until V-E Day, the Eighth Air Force lost more men than did the entire United States Marine Corps in all its campaigns in the Pacific. The Mighty Eighth chronicles the testimony of the pilots, bombardiers, navigators, and gunners who daily put their lives on the line. Their harrowing accounts recall the excitement and terror of dogfights against Nazi aces, maneuvering explosive-laden aircraft through deadly flak barrages, and fending off waves of enemy fighters while coping with subzero temperatures.
Beginning with the opening salvos from a mere dozen planes, crewmen describe the raids on Berlin and Dresden, the fiasco at Ploesti, Romania, and Black Thursday over Schweinfurt. They fell to the terror of seeing aircraft destroyed--helplessly watching as comrades crash and burn, or parachute over enemy territory, where they will attempt to evade enemy capture through the underground. Others tell of mourning downed airmen murdered by vengeful citizens and soldiers, and of those who endured captivity in POW camps.

Half a Wing, Three Engines and a Prayer by Brian D. O'Neill by Brian D. O'Neill
Publishers blurb:
In 1943, when the outcome of World War II hung in the balance, B-17 crews of the Eighth Air Force flew harrowing, unescorted daylight bombing missions deep into Occupied Europe and Germany. These devastating raids have long been storied in film and fiction, but here is a firsthand, blow-by-blow account of these perilous missions as they really happened. In these pages, you'll see the events unfold as they were recorded and recalled by one crew's officers and enlisted men (pilot, copilot, navigator, radioman, and gunners), corroborated by other crews they flew with, and painstakingly correlated with the official records of the men's 303rd "Hell's Angels" Bomb Group.
The publication of Half a Wing, Three Engines, and a Prayer in 1989 prompted a flood of fresh recollections, correspondence, and personal records from other veterans of the 303rd. This Special Revised Edition incorporates that wealth of new material into a vivid, thorough recreation -- complete with actual combat photographs -- of one of the most dramatic chapters in military aviation history.


message 239: by Michael, Assisting Moderator Axis Forces (last edited Jun 04, 2010 09:38PM) (new)

Michael Flanagan (Loboz) | 282 comments Thanks for all your suggestions. They all look like great books I'll add them to my to-read list. I found Michael Veitchs books Fly and Flak a good collection of interviews of Airmen of all types from WW II.


message 240: by 'Aussie Rick', Moderator (new)

'Aussie Rick' (AussieRick) | 7150 comments Hi Michael, didn't realise you were another Aussie. What's your main area of interest in WW2?


message 241: by Michael, Assisting Moderator Axis Forces (new)

Michael Flanagan (Loboz) | 282 comments From freezing Hobart :) I don't have a specific area if interest, I just love reading about World War II. I read what ever subject catches my eye. I make it a pollicy of mine to stick my head out of WW II and read something else everynow and then, usually still Military Hustory related. What about you what's your main interest area?


message 242: by 'Aussie Rick', Moderator (new)

'Aussie Rick' (AussieRick) | 7150 comments Hi Michael, I love all military history from the Spartans through to the current conflicts, land, air & sea! I am currently reading James Holland's new book "The Battle of Britain".

The Battle of Britain by James Holland


message 243: by Rod (new)

Rod | 15 comments Dear Aussie Rick
You might then like to try "Culloden" by John Prebble - as good as any WW2 battle account and some of the English were like the SS. I just read it on holiday and it gave me nightmares - poor old Highlanders another case of brave men led by fools! And then.... but I will leave you to read it.
Rod


message 244: by carl (new)

carl  theaker | 899 comments hehe, good! previous experience w/the author always helps.
after i wrote that i hoped no one would take it the wrong way.
Let us know if something reveltory comes up.

'Aussie Rick' wrote: "Hi Carl,
So far it isn't too bad. I have read the author's previous books and they have all been pretty decent so they didn't need to try hard to sell this book to me :)"



message 245: by carl (new)

carl  theaker | 899 comments I'll add to the disappointment with 'Wild Blue', and I felt that
before Ambrose had to settle for essentially copying the whole idea from a lesser known author.

A lot of it is padding w/stats. But and that's a big butt,
the stories from the crewmen are great. About a year
after I read it we were chatting w/some 'old folks' at
a bar where they were having a Big Band dance. The
man was Lt. Cook mentioned ~pg 186. We all became
friends and meet up every month when they have
similar music. So afterall I'm glad I read the book.

Dr. Michael wrote: "I was disappointed with this book. After reading D Day, Citizen Soldiers, Band Of Brothers and Pegasus Bridge this book (Wild Blue) did not live up to it's predecessors. More a story of Sen. George..."


message 246: by 'Aussie Rick', Moderator (new)

'Aussie Rick' (AussieRick) | 7150 comments Rod wrote: "Dear Aussie Rick
You might then like to try "Culloden" by John Prebble - as good as any WW2 battle account and some of the English were like the SS. I just read it on holiday and it gave me nightm..."


Hi Rod, I was lucky visit and walk over the battlefield at Culloden some many years back and bought my copy of John Prebble's book at the visitor centre, a great and horrific story as you mentioned.


message 247: by 'Aussie Rick', Moderator (new)

'Aussie Rick' (AussieRick) | 7150 comments Hi Carl, that's great you managed to meet Lt. Cook, pretty amazing! Those blokes who flew bombers during WW2 had a lot of guts.


message 248: by 'Aussie Rick', Moderator (new)

'Aussie Rick' (AussieRick) | 7150 comments Here is a new addition to books covering World War Two by a London based Australian author who has published books on Singapore and Australia's role in the Pacific theatre during WW2.

Anzac Fury  The Bloody Battle Of Crete 1941 by Peter Thompson by Peter Thompson
Publishers blurb:
ANZAC FURY commemorates the 65th anniversary of the end of World War II in Europe when 8900 Anzac prisoners of war captured in Greece and Crete were released from captivity. In 2010 it will be exactly 70 years since the 2nd AIF arrived in the Middle East to begin their extraordinary adventures in battles against the German and Italian armies in North Africa, mainland Greece and Crete prior to the outbreak of the Pacific War.

Written by a brilliant storyteller, ANZAC FURY tells the riveting story of how the legendary Anzac Corps was reformed in the heat of battle during World War II to fight a powerful and merciless foe.

Dramatically combining personal memories with combat action, ANZAC FURY gives voice to the experiences of young Australians and New Zealanders who were sent on Churchill’s orders from the victorious battlefields of Libya on a disastrous mission to Greece and Crete.
A companion volume to the acclaimed 2008 publication PACIFIC FURY, this book celebrates the Anzac spirit of sacrifice, mateship, courage and endurance that sustained the new Anzacs during the darkest days of the war.


message 249: by Dr. Michael (new)

 Dr. Michael Galvin (DrGalvin) | 134 comments Aussie Rick, I have both The Mighty Eighth and Half A Wing but have not gotten to them yet. Have you read Fighter Boys: The Battle Of Britain, 1940 by Patrick Bishop and/or Duel Of Eagles by Peter Townsend (not the same Pete Townsend from The Who)? Both excellent books and I highly recommend them.
A few more books I recommend regarding the bombing war over Europe:Fire & Fury: The Allied Bombing of Germany 1942-1945 by Randall Hansen, Into The Fire: Ploesti, The Most Fateful Mission od WWII by Duane Schultz, Mighty By Sacrifice: The Destruction of an American Bomber Squadron August 29, 1944 by JamesL. Noles & James L. Noles, Jr.,and Tail-End Charlies: The Last Battles of the Bomber War 1944-45 by John Nicol & Tony Rennell.
If you enjoy the Nicol & Rennell book they also wrote the excellent The Last Escape: The Untold Story Of The Allied Prisoners Of War In Europe 1944-45.
Back to The Battle Of Britain, here is another interesting book: The Few: The American "Knights Of The Air" Who Risked Everything To Fight In The Battle Of Britain by Alex Kershaw. I'd recommend anything written by Kershaw.


message 250: by 'Aussie Rick', Moderator (new)

'Aussie Rick' (AussieRick) | 7150 comments Hi Dr. Michael,

We have a very similar taste in good books! I have read Patrick Bishop's "Fighter Boys" and have a copy of his "Bomber Boys" to read. I have a copy of Peter Townsend's book as well on my 'to-read' list.

Out of the rest of the books I have read:
"Into The Fire" by Duane Schultz
"The Few" by Alex Kershaw (and agree he is a great author)

I have these on my to-read list:
"Fire & Fury: The Allied Bombing of Germany 1942-1945"
"Tail-End Charlies"


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