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ABOUT BOOKS AND READING > Title Origins and/or Meanings

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message 1: by Joy H., Group Founder (new)

Joy H. (JoyofGlensFalls) | 11789 comments If you come across a title origin or know the meaning of a title, please post it here.


message 2: by Joy H., Group Founder (new)

Joy H. (JoyofGlensFalls) | 11789 comments The Painted Veil is a 1925 novel by British author W. Somerset Maugham. The title is taken from Percy Bysshe Shelley's sonnet which begins "Lift not the painted veil which those who live / Call Life".
FROM: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/The_Pain...


message 3: by Joy H., Group Founder (new)

Joy H. (JoyofGlensFalls) | 11789 comments The House of Mirth(1905), by Edith Wharton, is a novel about New York socialite Lily Bart attempting to secure a husband and a place in rich society. It is one of the first novels of manners in American literature. The title derives from Ecclesiastes 7:4:
"The heart of the wise is in the house of mourning; but the heart of fools is in the house
of mirth."
FROM: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/The_Hous...


message 4: by Joy H., Group Founder (last edited Mar 28, 2011 04:53AM) (new)

Joy H. (JoyofGlensFalls) | 11789 comments THE DAYS OF WINE AND ROSES:
"They are not long, the days of wine and roses; / Out of a misty dream / Our path emerges for a while, then closes / Within a dream."
-from a poem by Ernest Dowson, entitled:
"Vitae Summa Brevis Spem Nos Vetet Incohare Longam" (1896).
The title is from Horace: "The short span of life forbids us to entertain long hopes."

Also, the title, Gone With the Wind, is from a poem by Ernest Dowson:
"I have forgot much, Cynara! gone with the wind..."

FROM:
http://www.absoluteastronomy.com/topi...
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Days_of_...
http://www.imdb.com/title/tt0055895/ (film)
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ernest_D...


message 5: by Joy H., Group Founder (new)

Joy H. (JoyofGlensFalls) | 11789 comments SONG: "Always True to You in My Fashion" by Cole Porter
The song title was inspired by a poem by Ernest Dowson containing the line:
"I have been faithful to thee, Cynara! in my fashion."
See: http://www.absoluteastronomy.com/topi...


message 6: by Joy H., Group Founder (last edited Mar 04, 2010 11:59AM) (new)

Joy H. (JoyofGlensFalls) | 11789 comments RE TITLE: The Wings of the Dove by Henry James:
The title refers to the 55th Psalm, which records the deceit and guile of conspirators and exclaims:
"Oh that I had wings like a dove!
For then I would flee away and be at rest."
FROM: http://www.mcgoodwin.net/pages/otherb...


message 7: by Joy H., Group Founder (new)

Joy H. (JoyofGlensFalls) | 11789 comments The Sun Also Rises by Hemingway is from the quote:
"The sun also rises, and the sun goes down, and hurries to its place where it rises."
-Ecclesiastes 1:5

AN EXPLANATION FROM WESLEY'S BIBLE:
====================================================
"The sun - The sun is in perpetual motion, rising, setting, and rising again, and so constantly repeating its course in all succeeding days, and years, and ages ... there is nothing in the world but a constant repetition of the same things, which is so irksome, that the consideration thereof hath made some persons weary of their lives; and there is no new thing under the sun ... And this is certain from experience that the things of this world are so narrow, and the mind of man so vast, that there must be something new to satisfy the mind; and even delightful things by too frequent repetition, are so far from yielding satisfaction, that they grow tedious and troublesome."
-Wesley's Notes on the Bible
FROM: http://bible.cc/ecclesiastes/1-5.htm
=====================================================


message 8: by Joy H., Group Founder (last edited Mar 04, 2010 12:16PM) (new)

Joy H. (JoyofGlensFalls) | 11789 comments Movie: "The Hurt Locker" (2008)
http://www.netflix.com/Movie/The_Hurt...

The Hurt Locker is the box where Will keeps the devices that almost killed him.
FROM: http://answers.yahoo.com/question/ind...

There are other explanations. For example, Wiki says:
"The title is slang for being injured in an explosion, as in 'they sent him to the hurt locker'."
FROM: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/The_Hurt...


message 9: by Joy H., Group Founder (last edited Mar 13, 2010 04:20PM) (new)

Joy H. (JoyofGlensFalls) | 11789 comments Crocodile on the Sandbank by Elizabeth Peters (pen name of Barbara Mertz)

The title comes from the English translation of an ancient Egyptian love poem:

'The love of my beloved is on yonder side
A width of water is between us
and a crocodile waiteth on the sandbank.'"


The author, Elizabeth Peters/Barbara Mertz, has a Ph.D. in Egyptology.
The Goodreads page of the author is at:
http://www.goodreads.com/author/show/...

Thank you to our member, Werner A. Lind, (a Goodreads Author) for this information.
http://www.goodreads.com/author/show/...

I found the following Awards and Honors for the book:
========================================================
ALA Popular Paperbacks for Young Adults (1998.04 | Adult Mysteries for Teens, 1998)
IMBA's 100 Favorite Mysteries of the 20th Century
Bloomsbury 100 Must-Read Crime Novels
The Top 100 Mystery Novels of All Time Mystery Writers of America (82)
(See links for above at: http://www.librarything.com/work/1234...
========================================================
IMBA = Independent Mystery Booksellers Association


message 10: by Joy H., Group Founder (last edited Jun 03, 2011 04:07AM) (new)

Joy H. (JoyofGlensFalls) | 11789 comments I've never read or seen A Clockwork Orange by Anthony Burgess but I have often wondered about the meaning of the title. The following links provide excellent explanations about the title and the story itself:
http://answers.yahoo.com/question/ind...
http://answers.yahoo.com/question/ind...
http://answers.yahoo.com/question/ind...
http://answers.yahoo.com/question/ind...
http://mubi.com/topics/1559

Below are some excerpts from the links above:
====================================================
"A clockwork is an artificial mechanical copy of something, like a robot. Alex became a clockwork when the authorities took away his human impulses. An old british cockney saying 'queer as a clockwork orange' translates as an object 'as strange and useless as a mechanical fruit, that you cannot use or eat' "

"Here is how Burgess himself explained the title:
'by definition, a human being is endowed with free will. He can use this to choose between good and evil. If he can only perform good or only perform evil, then he is a clockwork orange--meaning that he has the appearance of an organism lovely with colour and juice but is in fact only a clockwork toy to be wound by God or the Devil or (since this is increasingly replacing both) the Almighty State. It is as inhuman to be totally good as it is to be totally evil.'"
Source: Burgess's introduction to Clockwork Orange

"Burgess thought that the phrase could be used punningly to refer to a mechanically responsive (clockwork) human (orang, Malay for 'man'").

"In the book and movie, it connoted a person who has no free will, a person who could only be good or bad, but nothing in between--and human beings, if they have free will--must be a combination of good and evil."

"It is a philosophical, dystopian novel. It raises the moral question: Is it better to be destructive by your own will, or to be benign by being forced into a certain set of behaviors?"
====================================================

There is so much meaning hidden in the title.
Very hidden! :)
At least it made me curious.:)


message 11: by Joy H., Group Founder (last edited May 09, 2011 01:34PM) (new)

Joy H. (JoyofGlensFalls) | 11789 comments About the book The 39 Steps by John Buchan, I just read the following about how the title of the book originated:
=============================================
"Buchan's son, William, later wrote that the name of the book originated when the author's daughter, then about age six, was counting the stairs at a private nursing home in Broadstairs, where Buchan was convalescing. 'There was a wooden staircase leading down to the beach. My sister, who was about six, and who had just learnt to count properly, went down
them and gleefully announced: there are 39 steps.' Some time later the house was demolished and a section of the stairs, complete with a brass plaque, was sent to Buchan."
FROM: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/The_Thir...
==================================================

Additional info of interest from link above:

"There have been several film versions of the book; all depart substantially from the text, for example introducing a love interest absent from the original novel. For the films, the title is often abbreviated to The 39 Steps, but the full title is more commonly used for the book and for the 1978 adaptation."

"An interesting feature of the phrase "the 39 Steps" is that its meaning in each of the film versions is essentially different not only from the book, but also among the various films. In the 1935 film and the 1959 remake, the phrase refers to the clandestine organisation itself; in the book and in the 1978 and 2008 film versions, it does refer to physical steps, but located in different places and with different significance to the plot."

Below is a link to Alfred Hitchcock's movie, "The 39 Steps" (1935):
http://www.imdb.com/title/tt0026029/


message 12: by Joy H., Group Founder (last edited May 09, 2011 01:35PM) (new)

Joy H. (JoyofGlensFalls) | 11789 comments The title "My Brother's Keeper" comes from the Book of Genesis in the Bible. When God asks Cain where his brother Abel is, Cain replies, "I know not; am I my brother's keeper?"
FROM: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Brother%...

There's a documentary film called "Brother's Keeper" about a murder in NY State. (See above link.)

There are many books entitled "My Brother's Keeper":
My Brother's Keeper by Patricia McCormick
My Brother's Keeper by ReShonda Tate Billingsley
My Brother's Keeper by Abigail Roux
My Brother's Keeper by Marcia Davenport
My Brother's Keeper by Charles Sheffield
and many more.


message 13: by Joy H., Group Founder (last edited May 23, 2011 08:51AM) (new)

Joy H. (JoyofGlensFalls) | 11789 comments Kings of the Earth by Jon Clinch

The title come from the King James Bible:
"And the kings of the earth, and the great men, and the rich men, and the chief captains, and the mighty men, and every bondman, and every free man, hid themselves in the dens and in the rocks of the mountains."


message 14: by Joy H., Group Founder (new)

Joy H. (JoyofGlensFalls) | 11789 comments I haven't read Children of the Alley: A Novel (aka Children of Gebelawi), but I've learned the meaning of the title from Wiki:
========================================================
"The story recreates the tied history of the three monotheistic Abrahamic religions (Judaism, Christianity, and Islam), allegorised against the setting of an imaginary 19th century Cairene neighborhood.

"Gabalawi being an allegory for religion in general, the first four sections retell, in succession, the stories of: Adam and how he was favored by Gabalawi over the latter's other sons ...; Moses ...; Jesus ...; and Muhammad .... Families of each son settle in different parts of the alley, symbolising Judaism, Christianity and Islam.

"The protagonist of the book's fifth section is Arafa ..., who symbolises modern science and, significantly, comes after all prophets, while all of their followers claim Arafa as one of their own."
FROM: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Children...
========================================================


message 15: by Joy H., Group Founder (last edited Jun 04, 2011 07:11PM) (new)

Joy H. (JoyofGlensFalls) | 11789 comments "The title of The Heart Is a Lonely Hunter (1940) (by Carson McCullers) comes from a poem by William Sharp, with the lines:
'But my heart is a lonely hunter that hunts / On a lonely hill.'
... McCullers's original title for the book was The Mute."
FROM: http://www.readinggroupguides.com/gui...

I haven't read the book but I did watch the film. See my comments here:
http://www.goodreads.com/review/show/...


message 16: by Joy H., Group Founder (last edited Feb 15, 2012 12:08AM) (new)

Joy H. (JoyofGlensFalls) | 11789 comments The meaning of the title, Cutting for Stone by Abraham Verghese is explained below:
=============================================
Verghese, explaining his title in an interview, said:
“There is a line in the Hippocratic Oath that says: ‘I will not cut for stone, even for patients in whom the disease is manifest.’ It stems from the days when bladder stones were epidemic, a cause of great suffering, probably from bad water and who knows what else. […] There were itinerant stonecutters—lithologists—who could cut either into the bladder or the perineum and get the stone out, but because they cleaned the knife by wiping it on their blood-stiffened surgical aprons, patients usually died of infection the next day. Hence the proscription ‘Thou shall not cut for stone.’ […] It isn’t just that the main characters have the surname Stone; I was hoping the phrase would resonate for the reader just as it does for me, and that it would have several levels of meaning in the context of the narrative.”
SEE: http://thebaochi.com/2011/10/08/autho...


message 17: by Joy H., Group Founder (last edited Mar 01, 2012 11:57AM) (new)

Joy H. (JoyofGlensFalls) | 11789 comments Below is from Wiki re: Eyeless in Gaza:
==============================================
"Eyeless in Gaza is a bestselling novel by Aldous Huxley, first published in 1936. The title originates from a phrase in John Milton's Samson Agonistes:

... Promise was that I
Should Israel from Philistian yoke deliver;
Ask for this great deliverer now, and find him
Eyeless in Gaza at the Mill with slaves ...

The title of the book, like Milton's poem, recalls the biblical story of Samson, who was captured by the Philistines, his eyes burned out, and taken to Gaza, where he was forced to work grinding grain in a mill.
FROM: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Eyeless_...
=============================================
Also see:
http://www.enotes.com/eyeless-gaza-sa...
http://www.jstor.org/pss/3506521


message 18: by Joy H., Group Founder (new)

Joy H. (JoyofGlensFalls) | 11789 comments "One Flew Over the Cuckoo's Nest"
Film and Book: One Flew Over the Cuckoo's Nest

"The film's title was derived from a familiar, tongue-twisting Mother's Goose children's folk song (or nursery rhyme) called "Vintery, Mintery, Cutery, Corn". The ones that fly east and west are diametrically opposed to each other and represent the two combatants in the film. The one that flies over the cuckoo's nest [the mental hospital filled with "cuckoo" patients] is the giant, 'deaf-mute' Chief."

THE RHYME:
Vintery, mintery, cutery, corn,
Apple seed and apple thorn;
Wire, briar, limber lock,
Three geese in a flock.
One flew east,
And one flew west,
And one flew over the cuckoo's nest.

FROM: http://www.funtrivia.com/askft/Questi...

Other links:
http://www.funtrivia.com/askft/Questi...
http://www.shmoop.com/one-flew-over-c...
"One way to think the meaning of the epigraph is that there are two distinct groups presented: the geese that fly east and those that fly west. These groups are going in opposite directions, kind of like the patients versus Nurse Ratched and her hospital staff minions. The goose that flies over the cuckoo’s nest would be McMurphy, because he’s the one that ends up crazy (or cuckoo) in the end because of his lobotomy. Notice how one goose also escapes and is plucked from the "cuckoo’s nest" or the asylum. That one goose would be Chief. But Chief didn’t find out how to escape alone; McMurphy played the savior, teaching Chief how to escape from the ward."

So which one flew over the cuckoo's nest, McMurphy or Chief? There seem to be two different interpretations.


message 19: by Joy H., Group Founder (new)

Joy H. (JoyofGlensFalls) | 11789 comments PS-Wiki says:
================================================
"The title of the book is a line from a nursery rhyme,

Vintery, mintery, cutery, corn,
Apple seed and apple thorn,
Wire, briar, limber lock
Three geese in a flock
One flew East
One flew West
And one flew over the cuckoo's nest"

"Chief Bromden's grandmother sang this song to him when he was young. To "fly over a cuckoo's nest" is to transcend the absurdity of man's earthly existence, symbolized by the hospital."
=================================================


Jim (JimMacLachlan) | 3978 comments Great movie & book. I saw the movie a couple of times before I read the book, but enjoyed both very much. Kesey wrote another book that became a fantastic movie, Sometimes a Great Notion. It stars Henry Fonda, Lee Remick, Paul Newman & more.
http://www.imdb.com/title/tt0067774/


message 21: by Joy H., Group Founder (new)

Joy H. (JoyofGlensFalls) | 11789 comments Jim, I see that Netflix has "Sometimes a Great Notion" (1970) available for streaming. (It's aka: "Never Give a Inch".):
http://movies.netflix.com/WiMovie/600...
I've put in on my Netflix Instant Queue. I love both Paul Newman and Henry Fonda. They play a father and son. What a great pairing.


Jim (JimMacLachlan) | 3978 comments "Never Give An Inch" is a much better title for it, Joy. This is one of those movies that no one seems to know about & I don't know why. It's so well done, has so many great stars, & ends so perfectly. Fonda plays a very tough old man & the ending is just about perfect. Watch closely at the very end!


message 23: by Joy H., Group Founder (last edited Aug 06, 2012 12:52PM) (new)

Joy H. (JoyofGlensFalls) | 11789 comments Jim, I've moved "Sometimes a Great Notion"/"Never Give An Inch" to the top of my Netflix Instant Queue.

After I finish watching "The Women on the 6th Floor", I might watch the Newman/Fonda movie. (I'll try to remember to watch closely at the end.)

Tomorrow I should be receiving the Netflix DVD (Disc #1) of "The Forsyte Saga" (1976). I've got a lot to watch. :)


Jim (JimMacLachlan) | 3978 comments Super! Let me know what you think.


message 25: by Joy H., Group Founder (last edited Aug 08, 2012 02:39AM) (new)

Joy H. (JoyofGlensFalls) | 11789 comments Jim wrote: "Super! Let me know what you think."

OK, Jim, I will. I started watching "The Forsyte Saga" but the kids rolled in to start their camping last night and things got hectic. Netflix will have to wait. :)


Werner | 1546 comments The title of the novel If Ever I Return, Pretty Peggy-O, the first book in Sharyn McCrumb's popular Ballad Series, comes from an old folk song, "Fenario," also sometimes known as "The Bonnie Streets of Fyvie-O." A fuller quotation reads:
"If ever I return, Pretty Peggy-O,
If ever I return, Pretty Peggy-O,
If ever I return, all your cities I will burn,
Destroying all the ladies in the area-o."

(The novel deals with a killer who sends threatening postcards to a folksinger, each one with quotes from folk song lyrics. The title quote is the one on the last postcard.)


message 27: by Joy H., Group Founder (last edited Aug 08, 2012 11:02PM) (new)

Joy H. (JoyofGlensFalls) | 11789 comments Werner wrote: "The title of the novel If Ever I Return, Pretty Peggy-O, the first book in Sharyn McCrumb's popular Ballad Series, comes from an old folk song, "Fenario," also sometimes known as "The Bonnie Street..."

Thanks for the info, Werner.
I wonder why the author calls her series "Ballad". I guess it's because the mysteries in the series deal with songs.

PS-Collins Dictionary defines "ballad" as follows:
1. a narrative song with a recurrent refrain
2. a narrative poem in short stanzas of popular origin, originally sung to a repeated tune
3. a slow sentimental song, esp a pop song


Werner | 1546 comments Yes, several (though not all) of the Ballad series novels have plots that relate to old folk ballads. The first one is a good example, but it's also true of, for instance, The Ballad of Frankie Silver, and The Songcatcher.


message 29: by Joy H., Group Founder (new)

Joy H. (JoyofGlensFalls) | 11789 comments Werner wrote: "Yes, several (though not all) of the Ballad series novels have plots that relate to old folk ballads. The first one is a good example, but it's also true of, for instance, The Ballad of Frankie Si..."

It's a great idea for a theme.


message 30: by Joy H., Group Founder (new)

Joy H. (JoyofGlensFalls) | 11789 comments The Chronicles of Narnia by C.S. Lewis
The name "Narnia" is based on Narni (in Latin, Narnia), an ancient hilltown in central Italy.

I found following at Wiki:
==================================================
"Lancelyn Green wrote: 'When Walter Hooper asked [C.S. Lewis] where he found the word 'Narnia', Lewis showed him [an Atlas] ... which he acquired when he was reading the classics ... On plate 8 of the Atlas is a map of ancient Italy. Lewis had underscored the name of a little town called Narnia ['Narni' in Italian], simply because he liked the sound of it. ... [9]"

[9] Roger Lancelyn Green and Walter Hooper, C. S. Lewis: A Biography, 2002, p. 306.

FROM: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Narnia
======================================================


message 31: by Joy H., Group Founder (last edited Oct 26, 2012 05:11AM) (new)

Joy H. (JoyofGlensFalls) | 11789 comments About: Sometimes a Great Notion by Ken Kesey*** (first published 1964)

This book gets its title from the song: "Goodnight Irene". See the info from Wiki below:
==================================================
"Goodnight, Irene" or "Irene, Goodnight," is a 20th century American folk standard ... first recorded by American blues musician Huddie 'Lead Belly' Ledbetter in 1933. The lyrics tell of the singer's troubled past with his love, Irene, and express his sadness and frustration. Several verses make explicit references to suicidal fantasies, most famously in the line "sometimes I take a great notion to jump in the river and drown," which was the inspiration for the 1964 Ken Kesey novel Sometimes a Great Notion.
FROM: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Goodnigh...
==================================================

*** Ken Kesey wrote One Flew Over the Cuckoo's Nest.


message 32: by Joy H., Group Founder (new)

Joy H. (JoyofGlensFalls) | 11789 comments RE: The Crucible by Arthur Miller

"The word crucible is contextually defined as a metal container in which metals or other substances are subjected to high temperatures. Each character is metaphorically a metal subjected to the heat of the surrounding situation. The characters whose moral standards prevail in the face of death, such as John Proctor and Rebecca Nurse, symbolically refuse to melt."
FROM: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/The_Cruc...


Werner | 1546 comments Midlothian is the county in Scotland in which Edinburgh is located; and the city's prison (the Toll-booth, in Scots dialect), was from very early times popularly nicknamed "the heart of Midlothian." That's the origin of the title of Sir Walter Scott's excellent novel The Heart of Mid-Lothian (1818), since the Toll-booth forms the setting or omnipresent backdrop of many of its early scenes.


message 34: by Joy H., Group Founder (new)

Joy H. (JoyofGlensFalls) | 11789 comments Werner wrote: "Midlothian is the county in Scotland in which Edinburgh is located; and the city's prison (the Toll-booth, in Scots dialect), was from very early times popularly nicknamed 'the heart of Midlothian' That's the origin of the title of Sir Walter Scott's excellent novel _The Heart of Mid-Lothian_ (1818) ..."

Werner, thanks for the information. I had never heard of this novel before now. So you have expanded my literary horizons. I followed your link and found the following in the book description of The Heart of Mid-Lothian:
============================================
"At the centre of both narratives is Edinburgh's forbidding prison, the Tolbooth, known by all as the Heart of Midlothian."
============================================

Coincidentally, today on CNN-TV news they're talking about the on-going case of a mother (Casey Anthony) who was accused of killing her child, a case similar to the way the character, Effie, was accused of murdering her missing child, in the Sir Walter Scott novel.

"...an American two-year-old girl who was reported missing...
Her ... mother, Casey Marie Anthony, was tried for the first degree murder"
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Casey_An...

"Casey Anthony, 26, was acquited of murdering her 2-year-old daughter in 2011..."
http://abcnews.go.com/US/casey-anthon...

Unfortunately, it's a timely topic, even nowadays.


message 35: by Joy H., Group Founder (last edited Jan 19, 2013 10:07AM) (new)

Joy H. (JoyofGlensFalls) | 11789 comments Blithe Spirit by Noël Coward

FROM WIKI:
===================================
Blithe Spirit is a comic play written by Noël Coward which takes its title from Shelley's poem,
"To a Skylark" ("Hail to thee, blithe Spirit! / Bird thou never wert").
...
Blithe Spirit is a 1945 British fantasy-comedy feature film directed by David Lean. The screenplay ... is based on producer Noël Coward's 1941 play of the same name, the title of which is derived from the line "Hail to thee, blithe Spirit! Bird thou never wert" in the poem "To a Skylark" by Percy Bysshe Shelley.
FROM:
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Blithe_S...
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Blithe_S...
=============================================

(Poem by Percy Bysshe Shelley 1792–1822)

See the complete poem, "To a Skylark", at:
http://www.poetryfoundation.org/poem/...
Wiki info: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/To_a_Sky...
"A skylark is addressed by the poet, who calls it a "blithe Spirit" rather than a bird, because its song emanates from Heaven. ... A skylark soars into the sky singing happily. ... What accounts for the happiness of the song of the skylark? It is free from all that gives pain to man. It knows what lies beyond death and has no fear."


message 36: by Joy H., Group Founder (last edited Jan 22, 2013 12:27PM) (new)

Joy H. (JoyofGlensFalls) | 11789 comments Far from the Madding Crowd by Thomas Hardy

The title "Far From the Madding Crowd" comes from Thomas Gray's famous 18th-century poem "Elegy Written in a Country Churchyard":
============================================
Far from the madding crowd's ignoble strife,
Their sober wishes never learn'd to stray;
Along the cool sequester'd vale of life
They kept the noiseless tenor of their way. ---Stanza 19
SEE COMPLETE POEM AT: http://www.bartleby.com/101/453.html
===========================================

BELOW IS FROM SPARKNOTES:
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
"By alluding to Gray's poem, Hardy evokes the rural culture that, by Hardy's lifetime, had become threatened with extinction at the hands of ruthless industrialization. His novel thematizes the importance of man's connection to, and understanding of, the natural world. Gabriel Oak embodies Hardy's ideal of a life in harmony with the forces of the natural world.

"One of Hardy's central concerns in all of his writing was the problem of modernity in a society that was rapidly becoming more and more industrial. One of his projects as a writer was to create an account of life in the swiftly changing Dorsetshire as it had once been. He was particularly interested in the rituals and histories of that part of England, as well as the dialect of its locals. The title Far From the Madding Crowd suggests avoidance of the life of a city, modernized government, crowds and industry; in it, Hardy tries to fashion a portrait of what he saw as an endangered way of life and to create a snapshot for future generations.

"Hardy was very much influenced by the ideas of Charles Darwin, who maintained that the development of a biological species--and, by extension, of human society and history--is shaped by chance and not by the design of a god."
ABOVE INFO IS FROM: http://www.sparknotes.com/lit/madding...
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

"Far from the Madding Crowd (1874) is Thomas Hardy's fourth novel and his first major literary success." -Wiki


message 37: by Joy H., Group Founder (new)

Joy H. (JoyofGlensFalls) | 11789 comments The World Split Open :
The World Split Open: How the Modern Women's Movement Changed America
by Ruth Rosen

I wondered about the origin of the above title: "The World Split Open".

The title comes from the following quote:
"What would happen if one woman told the truth about her life?
The world would split open."

-line from a poem* by Muriel Rukeyser (1913-1980)

*NOTE: The above lines are from a poem by Muriel Rukeyser. My research indicates that the poem is entitled: "Kathe Kollwitz" and that it can be found in the book: Out of Silence: Selected Poems (first published 1992) by Muriel Rukeyser, Kate Daniels (Editor).

SEE THE POEM HERE: http://iambecauseweare.wordpress.com/...

[Käthe Kollwitz (1867-1945) was a German painter, printmaker, and sculptor whose work offered an eloquent and often searing account of the human condition, and the tragedy of war, in the first half of the 20th century.]-wiki

ABOUT THE BOOK OF POEMS MENTIONED ABOVE:
http://www.goodreads.com/book/show/75...
http://www.amazon.com/gp/product/0810...

MORE about Ruth Rosen's book, The World Split Open:
https://play.google.com/store/books/d...
READ A SAMPLE HERE: https://play.google.com/books/reader?...


Nina | 2453 comments The only stanza of Muriel's R. poem that spoke to me was the "we rowed over to Carrara..." the others were somewhat too much. Just an opinion from an old woman.


message 39: by Joy H., Group Founder (last edited Apr 03, 2013 09:25AM) (new)

Joy H. (JoyofGlensFalls) | 11789 comments Nina wrote: "The only stanza of Muriel's R. poem that spoke to me was the "we rowed over to Carrara..." the others were somewhat too much. Just an opinion from an old woman."

Nina, I took one look at that poem and my eyes glazed over. LOL I didn't even bother to read it because it didn't engage me at all.

I remember a remark I once heard. They asked a fellow what kind of poems he liked. He replied that he liked the kind of poems he could understand! LOL I'm with him! IMO, poems shouldn't be puzzles!

PS-For those that are interested, see the poem here:
http://iambecauseweare.wordpress.com/...
The only part I liked was the last two lines. :)
Here they are:
====================================
"What would happen in one woman told the truth about her life?
The world would split open."

-line from a poem by Muriel Rukeyser (1913-1980)
====================================

PS-"Carrara is a city and comune in the Province of Massa and Carrara (Tuscany, Italy), notable for the white or blue-grey marble quarried there. It is on the Carrione River, some 100 kilometres (62 mi) west-northwest of Florence." -from Wiki


Nina | 2453 comments I've been to Carrara which might have been why that one line appealed to me. It was fascinating to see the huge cliffs of marble. By the way, the sidewalks in Athens are from that qyuarry.


message 41: by Joy H., Group Founder (new)

Joy H. (JoyofGlensFalls) | 11789 comments Nina wrote: "I've been to Carrara which might have been why that one line appealed to me. It was fascinating to see the huge cliffs of marble. By the way, the sidewalks in Athens are from that qyuarry."

Interesting, Nina!
Here's the Wiki page on Carrara marble:
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Carrara_...

I can't get over how sculptors are able to carve such beautiful statues out of hard marble. There's list of statues and structures made from Carrara marble at the Wiki page above. Among them is the Peace Monument in Washington, DC:
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Peace_Mo...


Nina | 2453 comments Joy, I made a mistake. I thought Cararra was in Greece as I saw a huge marble quarry in that country and the sidewalks in Athens were made of marble. Perhaps it was Carrera which is often taken they said in your web site for Carrara..Oh well, interesting subject. I once fell on the sidewalk in Athens and that's how I remember it was made of marble. Ouch!


message 43: by Joy H., Group Founder (last edited Apr 03, 2013 05:10PM) (new)

Joy H. (JoyofGlensFalls) | 11789 comments Nina wrote: "Joy, I made a mistake. I thought Cararra was in Greece as I saw a huge marble quarry in that country and the sidewalks in Athens were made of marble. Perhaps it was Carrera which is often taken the..."

Nina, we live and learn, eh? I had always heard of Cararra marble but I never knew where Cararra was until now. :)

As for Carerra, I found the following at Wiki:

Carrera Island is one of the Five Islands in the Gulf of Paria, Trinidad and Tobago. Situated off the northwest peninsula of Trinidad. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Carrera_...

The Lake General Carrera (Chilean side) or Lake Buenos Aires (Argentine side) is a lake located in Patagonia and shared by Argentina and Chile. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/General_...

I've always been impressed by the cold feel of marble. Of course, marble is a good conductor of heat and absorbs the heat from the skin, making the skin feel cold.


message 44: by Joy H., Group Founder (last edited Apr 03, 2013 05:16PM) (new)

Joy H. (JoyofGlensFalls) | 11789 comments I found the following about marble:
=====================================
Why is marble useful for buildings and statues?
ANSWER:
Marble is a very soft 'somewhat brittle' stone. This means that slabs of marble are relatively easy to carve and polish. However, when cut into hearth size slabs e.g. 3" thick x 5' long moving it becomes quite a task.
Marble is also strong and durable and can withstand rough weather.
FROM: http://wiki.answers.com/Q/Why_is_marb...
=============================================

That's interesting. I always thought marble was hard. :)

How can it be "strong" when it's so "soft"?


message 45: by Joy H., Group Founder (new)


message 46: by Joy H., Group Founder (last edited Apr 03, 2013 05:22PM) (new)

Joy H. (JoyofGlensFalls) | 11789 comments I think we're suffering from "thread drift". LOL
http://whatis.techtarget.com/referenc...


Jim (JimMacLachlan) | 3978 comments you should have a talk with the moderator!
;-)


message 48: by Joy H., Group Founder (new)

Joy H. (JoyofGlensFalls) | 11789 comments Jim wrote: "you should have a talk with the moderator!
;-)"


I never talk to myself! LOL


message 49: by Joy H., Group Founder (new)

Joy H. (JoyofGlensFalls) | 11789 comments Moderator's Theory and Modus Operandi:

Some of the most interesting conversations arise out of "thread drift". LOL


message 50: by Joy H., Group Founder (new)

Joy H. (JoyofGlensFalls) | 11789 comments Besides, who's listening? LOLOL


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