Comfort Reads discussion

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General > What are you reading right now? (SEE NEW THREAD)

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message 201: by Mary (new)

Mary | 245 comments I finished re-reading Chocolat and am now going to read Saving Ceecee Honeycutt: A Novel.


message 202: by Lee, Mod Mama (new)

Lee (LeeKat) | 3953 comments Mod
Mary wrote: "I finished re-reading Chocolat and am now going to read Saving Ceecee Honeycutt: A Novel."

Mary, Saving Ceecee Honeycutt: A Novel sounds like a hoot and has a beautiful cover!

I'm still working my way through the huge Sacajawea but it's very good.


message 203: by Laura (last edited Mar 15, 2010 01:12PM) (new)

Laura | 294 comments I am reading Castle Dor


message 204: by Barb (new)

Barb I just started on A Reliable Wife last night ... had to watch The Amazing Race though, so I only got through one chapter so far.


Kimberly | 237 comments I'm reading The No. 1 Ladies' Detective Agencyby Alexander McCall Smith. I started reading it last night and I'm more than halfway through it. It's turning out to be an amazing read.


message 206: by Lisa, Co-Mod Comfort Reader Extraordinaire (new)

Lisa Vegan (LisaVegan) | 3778 comments Mod
Kimberly wrote: "I'm reading The No. 1 Ladies' Detective Agencyby Alexander McCall Smith. I started reading it last night and I'm more than halfway through it. It's turning out to be an am..."

I really liked that, and the first book of one of his other series too. BUT, then I stopped. I haven't read any of the other books. I guess if I ever decide to read them, I'll have many to look forward to.


message 207: by Lee, Mod Mama (new)

Lee (LeeKat) | 3953 comments Mod
Kimberly wrote: "I'm reading The No. 1 Ladies' Detective Agencyby Alexander McCall Smith. I started reading it last night and I'm more than halfway through it. It's turning out to be an am..."

Kimberly, that's one of those books that everyone seems to love but it's hard to imagine why until you read it. I keep wondering about the appeal of that series.


message 208: by Chrissie (last edited Mar 15, 2010 01:36PM) (new)

Chrissie I just finished Niki: The Story of a Dog which I liked, although the ending disturbed me. It is not only about a dog but also about life in Budapest after WW2 and before the Hungarian Revolution, a failed attempt to throw the Communists out of power. I want to understand more about Hungarian history through the 1900s, so now I am reading The Storyteller: Memory, Secrets, Magic and Lies. It is utterly fabulous - so far. I have quoted some bits in my running review.

Lee, I missed that you had started Sacajawea. Do you really enjoy it? I hope I didn't lead you astray.

And Laura, you finished The Agony and the Ectasy. I have to go check out your review. I left a comment about the Daphne du Maurier book you are currently reading. They must mention Roscoff in Brittany. That is the town most famous for sending onion-sellers to Cornwall.


Kimberly | 237 comments I loved the television show and wanted to see how close the show stayed to the book and it's stayed pretty darn close... I love the character of Precious and the setting of the book...


Misfit The Last Aloha

The Last Aloha. Enjoying it a lot so far but it's early going.


message 211: by Mary (new)

Mary | 245 comments Lee, I am a sucker for a pretty book cover!


message 212: by Lee, Mod Mama (new)

Lee (LeeKat) | 3953 comments Mod
Chrissie, it took me a couple of hundred pages before I really got into the story but now I'm hooked! I love learning about the Lewis and Clark expedition and Sacajawea's role in events. I also especially love all the detail about camp life etc. It's really fascinating.


message 213: by Lee, Mod Mama (new)

Lee (LeeKat) | 3953 comments Mod
Mary wrote: "Lee, I am a sucker for a pretty book cover!"

Aren't we all?!? That hummingbird is so pretty!


Chrissie Lee, oh good, I read it very many ears ago and I was scared I would mislead you. But it has always stuck in my head! The book I am reading now is fabulous!


message 215: by Lisa, Co-Mod Comfort Reader Extraordinaire (new)

Lisa Vegan (LisaVegan) | 3778 comments Mod
I just finished a book and I'm about to start The Magicians for a book group. I'm nervous because when I first heard about it, it sounded really good, but many readers didn't enjoy it. I will see. There's a couple of books coming out next month that I have to read as soon as I get my hands on them: This World We Live In and The Spellmans Strike Again. Can't wait!!! Hope to read a few other books first though.


Laura | 294 comments Starting to read
Middlemarch by George Eliot which discussion starts tomorrow at Classics and the Western Canon.


message 217: by Jo (new)

Jo I'm reading The Ghost Writer


Gundula | 2717 comments Mod
Laura wrote: "Starting to read
Middlemarch by George Eliot which discussion starts tomorrow at Classics and the Western Canon."


That sounds interesting, Laura (I read the novel ages ago), I think I might join the group. Even though I don't usually see many of the classics as comfort reads, I love reading and discussing them.


Laura | 294 comments join us Gundula since we are planning to learn about the historical background while reading this book.


message 221: by Gundula (last edited Mar 16, 2010 08:22AM) (new)

Gundula | 2717 comments Mod
Laura wrote: "join us Gundula since we are planning to learn about the historical background while reading this book."

I did and that is exactly my kind of group. I love history and in university I always got sidetracked by historical aspects in novels etc. Well, actually, I should not call that sidetracked, I believe that the historical background for books (or the historical information present in books) is just as important as textual analysis, literary theory etc. (of course, many of my professors did not agree with me). I'll be ordering (or trying to order) a cheap copy of the book from Amazon today, and hopefully will start reading by this weekend. By the way, does your group ever read any German literature in translation (like Thomas Mann or Goethe)?


message 222: by Laura (last edited Mar 16, 2010 08:32AM) (new)

Laura | 294 comments I am glad you are going to join us Gundula!!! I am not sure if this group have already read any German literature but the moderator is a great guy, open to any kind of discussion. I also bought a cheap version of Middlemarch in order to able to join this discussion.


Gundula | 2717 comments Mod
Laura wrote: "I am glad you are going to join us Gundula!!! I am not sure if this group have already read any German literature but the moderator is a great guy, open to any kind of discussion. I also bought a c..."

I just ordered mine from Amazon Canada. That means I will probably get the book by Thursday or Friday. I've got a huge amount of book club read to go through, but this sounds so interesting. By the way, thanks for mentioning the book and the group, otherwise I would have never known about it.


Laura | 294 comments great Gundula, I hope you will enjoy this nice group. Yes, it´s hard to follow all book discussions. It´s better just to follow a few of them and once can follow the threads of others later on. Otherwise, we get crazy....


Diane D. | 482 comments Chrissie wrote: "I just finished Niki: The Story of a Dog which I liked, although the ending disturbed me. It is not only about a dog but also about life in Budapest after WW2 and before the Hungaria..."

Chrissie-- I just added both of these books to my TBR. My partner is from Hungary and I'd love to learn more about Hungarian history as well. Thanks for the tip! I think I would pick up Nicki first.....but I worry about your comment about the ending?


Chrissie Diane, remember that Niki is a NY classic. That says alot. The writing style is very unique. When I get thrown from one book to the other, I say there is just no comparison. I ADORE what I am reading now. One would assume that the dog book was a lighter read - it isn't at all. It is both extremely philosophical AND a charming photo of dog behavior. Forget comparing it to anything like Marley & Me: Love and Life with the World's Worst Dog or The Art of Racing in the Rain or any of the Herriot James books or my favorite Merle's Door: Lessons from a Freethinking Dog. You can feel when you read it why it is cllassified as a classic! It is a very short book and worth the experience of reading. It creates an atmosphere of life in Hungary after WW2, but few specifics. The prologue to the book offers some specifics and a comparison to what happened to the author. You can also read my review and the comments between Lisa and I to help you decide if you want to read it. The three stars mean exactly what it says - I liked it.

The Storyteller isn't just a history book. It is a biography of a family living through Hungarian history in the 1900s. To see if you like the writing style, check out my running review b/c I have quoted bits. You get Hungarian history and tales going back to the Huns, rhe 1400s, but predominantly the 1900s after WW2. If you want a dry history book, don't read this. Does this help you decide? I hope so.


Peregrine | 91 comments Lisa wrote: "Peregrine, I really enjoyed The Speed of Dark. I hope that you do too."

5 stars and definitely a comfort book. This is why I read, for stories like this.


Jeannette (Jvmimo) I've just started The Magicians and Mrs. Quent. It is a sci-fi/fantasy story, written in the style of Austen and Bronte. Right now I wish I had a big chunk of time to read it in!


message 231: by Diane D. (last edited Mar 17, 2010 10:58AM) (new)

Diane D. | 482 comments Chrissie wrote: "Diane, remember that Niki is a NY classic. That says alot. The writing style is very unique. When I get thrown from one book to the other, I say there is just no comparison. I ADORE what I am readi..."

Hi Chrissie. Yes it helps me decide and thanks for posting such a thorough explanation. I also read your review. To see that Nicki is a NY classic has me even more intrigued. I am going to stop at my library and see if I can get both books. Thanks too for mentioning Merle's Door, The Art of Racing in the Rain, and James Herriott. I've read all those books and understand when you say Nicki can't be compared. I'll remember to talk with you once I've gotten one of these books read. I'm excited to show them to my partner too.


Kathy  (readr4ever) | 1853 comments I've just started Death at the Alma Mater: A St. Just Mystery by one of my favorite new comfort mystery authors, G.M. Malliet.


Chrissie Diane, I haven't read the Art of Racing in the Rain. I fear it will be too melodramatic for me. I have read the Herriott books, but ages ago. Would I still like them? Well I am not so sure ..... They might be too tame. Merle's Door is SUPER! Marley and Me is just a fun read, but nothing more. My point is mainly that each are so very different. I like the diversity. BTW, I have lots of dog books on my fauna shelf.

I simply adore the writing style of The Storyteller!!!! The impossibility of understanding what happens to you that was described in Nikki, is also described tin this book! Everything is lies. Everybody was spying on each other. How do you teach a child honesty with all this going on around you?! Vili says to his granddaughter that lies in school are self-preservation; only the lies at home are the ones that count! These little kids comprehend this duplicity immediately.


message 234: by Diane D. (last edited Mar 17, 2010 12:47PM) (new)

Diane D. | 482 comments Chrissie -- I'll have to peruse your fauna shelf from home, as I'm sneeking in from work now...I see that you have 107 books on that shelf. The Art of Racing in the Rain is one of my all time favorites. I think you should give it a shot and let yourself be taken in by it. Don't have any expectations and see what you think ;)

I read The Zookeeper's Wife: A War Story about a year ago....that might be right up your alley.


message 235: by Lee, Mod Mama (new)

Lee (LeeKat) | 3953 comments Mod
Peregrine wrote: "Lisa wrote: "Peregrine, I really enjoyed The Speed of Dark. I hope that you do too."

5 stars and definitely a comfort book. This is why I read, for stories like this."


I get so excited when someone gives a book five stars and it's on my to-read list! Yay!


message 236: by Lisa, Co-Mod Comfort Reader Extraordinaire (new)

Lisa Vegan (LisaVegan) | 3778 comments Mod
Oh, I'm eager to read The Zookeeper's Wife: A War Story. It's one of the books I've suggested to my real world book club several times.


Diane D. | 482 comments Lisa wrote: "Oh, I'm eager to read The Zookeeper's Wife: A War Story. It's one of the books I've suggested to my real world book club several times."

That's who I read it with Lisa, my live book club.


CeeAnne | 3213 comments Lisa wrote: "Oh, I'm eager to read The Zookeeper's Wife: A War Story. It's one of the books I've suggested to my real world book club several times."

It's really good, Lisa.


message 239: by Lisa, Co-Mod Comfort Reader Extraordinaire (new)

Lisa Vegan (LisaVegan) | 3778 comments Mod
Diane & Christine, I might have to read it without them if not with them. Thanks.


Diane D. | 482 comments Hey Lisa, Christine and I can talk with you about it!


message 241: by Lisa, Co-Mod Comfort Reader Extraordinaire (new)

Lisa Vegan (LisaVegan) | 3778 comments Mod
Diane D. wrote: "Hey Lisa, Christine and I can talk with you about it!"

Okay. Hopefully, I'll get to it, sometime this year. My on-deck and to-read list is soooooooooo long. But, thanks; I'll keep that in mind!


Diane D. | 482 comments Lisa -- LOL! I know, I am the same with the "on deck" TBRs!!


message 243: by Chrissie (last edited Mar 17, 2010 11:17PM) (new)

Chrissie Christine and Diane D, I have had such a hard time determining whether to read the Zookeeper's Wife! I keep switching it from shelves "maybe", or "to read" or a "must" shelf. While it wanders, I still haven't read it. If I had a library it would be a different matter..... I think I would like that the horrible times of the German invasion of Poland and then a flip to the animasl would offer relief. That not all issues are completely covered, well no book answers all questions. Could you each tell me why you think I should read it. Now I am tempted again to put it back on a must shelf. ..... I will go take a peak and see if Book Depository has it. BAD , bad me!


CeeAnne | 3213 comments I actually like any book that shows a different part of the war that I had never really thought about. It's a wonderful history lesson to find those books. This one had a very unique story, and I was just really taken with it. It might not be everyone's cup of tea.


Chrissie Christine I have added it to my must shelf. Thanks for your advice. Basically b/c it has a mixture of history and animals and takes place in Poland. I amways figure, if I learn something, then it is not the end of the world if the writing style doesn't grab me. When I get both, WOW then I am very happy.Exactly what I am getting in The Storyteller: Memory, Secrets, Magic and Lies. It is a winner.


message 246: by Lee, Mod Mama (new)

Lee (LeeKat) | 3953 comments Mod
Chrissie, that Storyteller memoir looks very good! I've added it!


message 247: by Lisa, Co-Mod Comfort Reader Extraordinaire (new)

Lisa Vegan (LisaVegan) | 3778 comments Mod
Chrissie, I added it too. Thanks.


Chrissie Lee and Lisa, it is marvelous! Lots of history but told in a form that it goes down like ice cream. The text is funny too. The Spanish Civil War was "an uncivil civil war against civilians". Hungary did not support Franco. There are marvelous photos of the family members, but there is no map. So far that is all I can complain about. What is also interesting is that in this book the family members are not communists. They are a wealthy, well educated known Hungarian family. In Nikki the main characters are communists. Both are suffer, both are put in jail. Tha absurdity is jarring. I guess I have blabbed enough about this book here....... I simply must read more by this author, Anna Porter.


Kathy  (readr4ever) | 1853 comments I am also one of those who have been meaning to read The Zookeeper's Wife: A War Story for some time now. Like you, Lisa, I hope to get to it sometime this year, and like you, Chrissie, I keep switching it from one list to another, at times on my current month list and other times at to-be-read in the future. I do hope I read it in the coming months.

Also, Christine, I agree with you about reading and learning about parts of WWII that I hadn't previously given a lot of thought. I just finished Blackout by Connie Willis and learned so much about what people in London went through during the bombing of their city by the Germans. Also, another one of my favorite books is The Good German, a story that takes place in post-war Berlin, something I knew nothing about, and a book that takes a hard look at peoples' motivations and actions during war time and after.


Lori (Hellian) So what did you think of Blackout? I just finished it too. While any book from Connie Willis is cause for celebration, this one was slightly disappointing.


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