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Monthly Book Challenge > Artist Biography

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message 1: by Heather, Moderator (new)

Heather | 2384 comments Remember, if you choose to read a book in this category (and it can be any Art Biography) please put your name and the name of the book under 'comment'. You may even let us know your progress and what you are learning. When you finish the book, we look forward to your review!



message 2: by Heather, Moderator (new)

Heather | 2384 comments http://www.goodreads.com/book/show/19...

Heather 01/18/2010 Reading DEAR THEO an autobiography of Vincent van Gogh edited by Irving Stone (the author of Agony and the Ecstasy)




Andrew (Zunook) http://www.goodreads.com/book/show/38...

Andrew 01/18/2010 on Page 74. Reading Leonardo The Artist and The Man By Serge Bramly.

So it says Monthly book Challenge-February, does that mean to have read before feb or it is for that month? Because if it is for that month where is Jan? Did I miss it? Because I am reading this book this month. Or should I wait tell feb to start reading ;-)


message 4: by Heather, Moderator (new)

Heather | 2384 comments Andrew wrote: "http://www.goodreads.com/book/show/38...

Andrew 01/18/2010 on Page 74. Reading Leonardo The Artist and The Man By Serge Bramly.

So it says Monthly book Challe..."


Good question, Andrew! The reading challenge is for Feb, but we started in Jan because it is almost over. You don't have to wait until Feb to start reading it. You have a good start already, way to go!!!




message 5: by Heather, Moderator (new)

Heather | 2384 comments Heather wrote: "http://www.goodreads.com/book/show/19...

Heather 01/18/2010 Reading DEAR THEO an autobiography of Vincent van Gogh edited by Irving Stone (the auth..."


Currently on page 20. I am learning that at age 23, the young Vincent is deeply religious, and desires to work as a clergyman. I love what he says in a letter to his brother, July 1876. "Theo, woe is me if I do not preach the Gospel. If I did not aim at that and possess faith and hope in Christ, it would be bad for me indeed..."




message 6: by Heather, Moderator (new)

Heather | 2384 comments Still reading! Here is a great story that Vincent told his brother, Theo, in one of his letters. I think I can really learn from this:

"There once was a man who went to church one day and asked 'can it be that my zeal has deceived me, that I have taken the wrong road, and have not planned it well? Oh! If I might be freed from this uncertainty and might have the firm conviction that I shall conquer and succeed in the end!' and then a voice answered him: 'and if you knew that for certain, what should you do then?--act now as if you knew it for certain, and you will not be confounded.' And then the man went forth on his way, believing, and he went back to his work, no longer doubting or wavering."


message 7: by Heather, Moderator (new)

Heather | 2384 comments I like how when he writes to his brother, he is always describing the weather and the trees. It's almost as if I can 'see' the landscape he is experiencing in my own mind. And when I picture it, I see it through his paintings.


Terri (TerriLovesCrows) | 11 comments Heather wrote: "http://www.goodreads.com/book/show/19...

Heather 01/18/2010 Reading DEAR THEO an autobiography of Vincent van Gogh edited by Irving Stone (the auth..."


I need to pick this back up. I started it last year and had to return to library. Need to put a hold on it and resume


Andrew (Zunook) I am now on page 149 of Leonardo The Artist and The Man. Learning even more and more about him! Still love it and may even get done before Feb. even gets here! If my mom doesn't slave drive me to much at her doggy daycare business I am helping with :)


message 10: by Heather, Moderator (new)

Heather | 2384 comments I have been reading a library copy of Dear Theo but it has been difficult to not highlight and underline as I so much love to do! I now have a copy of my own and decided I would start reading the book over again. So far it has been a great decision because not only can I mark it up, but I learn even more the second time around!


message 11: by A. (new)

A. (almas) | 240 comments Heather wrote: "I have been reading a library copy of Dear Theo but it has been difficult to not highlight and underline as I so much love to do! I now have a copy of my own and decided I would start reading the b..."

Heather, are you writing your notes on this book in this thread or in another one?

I read this book long time ago and I don't remember much...perhaps your notes will refresh my memory.



message 12: by Heather, Moderator (new)

Heather | 2384 comments Hi Amal, no I haven't been writing my notes anywhere. This is because I have been a slacker at picking up the book again after buying my own. Now that I have begun reading it again, I can't put it down! And as I said, I started from the beginning so I'm only on pg 70 as of now. I will keep posting more now that I'm 'back into it' :)


message 13: by Heather, Moderator (new)

Heather | 2384 comments Van Gogh tells of his first love for his cousin K. He tells of how his love inspires his work. "In order to work and to become an artist one needs love. At least, one who wants sentiment in his work must in the first place feel it himself, and live with his heart."


message 14: by Heather, Moderator (new)

Heather | 2384 comments In various letters to Theo, van Gogh relates that a couple of people have purchased his "little drawings". His friend who sometimes loans him money has begun to buy a drawing here and there and his uncle has commissioned him to do a few drawings of the landscape and town for which he paid him. So although he may have only sold one painting in his lifetime, he did sell some drawings.


message 15: by A. (last edited Feb 11, 2010 08:07AM) (new)

A. (almas) | 240 comments Heather wrote: "In various letters to Theo, van Gogh relates that a couple of people have purchased his "little drawings". His friend who sometimes loans him money has begun to buy a drawing here and there and his..."

Heather, does the book say why he sold only one painting?

Is it b/c art stores rejected his paintings or is it b/c he wanted to keep them?


message 16: by Heather, Moderator (new)

Heather | 2384 comments I haven't gotten to the point that he has started painting yet. He begins with drawing and sketches. He has done some watercolors, but I don't think it has said anything about oil painting or about him doing any of the paintings that we are most familiar with. I do know that he is working on making his drawings 'salable', so he is planning on making his living off of his art.


message 17: by A. (new)

A. (almas) | 240 comments I still don't understand how artist at that time had the heart to sell their drawings or paintings.

Today, they overcome this issue by selling copies of the original painting and the artist keeps his.


message 18: by Heather, Moderator (new)

Heather | 2384 comments "About the carpenter's pencil I reason thus. The old masters, what did they use for drawing?...a rough piece of graphite. Perhaps the instrument that Michelangelo and Durer used resembles somewhat a carpenter's pencil...I prefer the graphite in its natural form to that cut so fine. And the shininess disappers by throwing some milk over it...Graphite is more nearly grey than black and one can always raise it a few tones by working it in again with the pen, so that the strongest effect of graphite becomes light again in contrast to the ink...Charcoal is good, but when one keeps at it too long, it loses its freshness, and to keep the delicacy of touch, one must fix it immediately...If someone invented a good pen to use out-of-doors, with an inkstand to go with it, perhaps more pen drawings would be given to the world"


message 19: by A. (new)

A. (almas) | 240 comments Heather wrote: " If someone invented a good pen to use out-of-doors, with an inkstand to go with it, perhaps more pen drawings would be given to the world" ..."

Today, we take what we have for granted!




message 20: by Heather, Moderator (new)

Heather | 2384 comments Pg 143 Vincent tells Theo why he hasn't begun painting but prefers drawing. "I hope you will understand that when I continue to stick to drawing, I do so for two reasons: because before all things I want to get a firm hand for drawing, and secondly, because painting and water-colouring cause a great many expenses which do not at first give back any value...And if I got into debt or surrounded myself with canvases and papers all daubed with paint, then my studio would soon become a sort of hell...Now, I always enter it with pleasure and work there with animation."


message 21: by Heather, Moderator (new)

Heather | 2384 comments I know it has only been two hours since my last post, but I am on pg 153 and now he has discovered the joy of painting. He writes: "Painting gives me light on different questions of tone and form and materials, before which I have up to now stood helpless. There is in painting something infinite...for expressing one's impression, it is so delightful. There are in colours hidden effects of harmony or contrast that involuntarily combine to work together, and which would not be possible if used in another way."


message 22: by A. (new)

A. (almas) | 240 comments Heather wrote: "Pg 143 Vincent tells Theo why he hasn't begun painting but prefers drawing. "I hope you will understand that when I continue to stick to drawing, I do so for two reasons: because before all things ..."

That's one of the reasons I don't like to paint :)

Up tell now I've never touched any canvas!



message 23: by Heather, Moderator (new)

Heather | 2384 comments wow, after reading several reviews already of various books you all have read for February, I am feeling a bit behind, which is a major understatement! I need to get reading!


Jen Knox | 1 comments I loved Dear Theo. I wanted to write my thesis about the tied between the self-portrait and memoir, but I never reigned in the subject. What floored me about this book though were Van Gogh's touching insights about color and emotion; he was truly amazing.


message 25: by Heather, Moderator (new)

Heather | 2384 comments You're right, Jen. He is always judging another artists' work based on their ability to communicate emotion through their paintings. He tries so hard to perfect his use of color and emotion.


Ruth | 885 comments And he had so much love for other people, yet always managed to make them angry at him.


message 27: by Heather, Moderator (new)

Heather | 2384 comments You're right, Ruth. He relishes in a beautiful day, or a cold evening by the fire, etc. and he wishes he could share the experience with someone else. He mentions to Theo that he doesn't have a friend and it makes me so sad.


message 28: by Heather, Moderator (new)

Heather | 2384 comments Speaking of color...Vincent says to Theo in one of his letters: "I sent you yesterday afternoon a very rough sketch of a water-colour...I send it because you will see it more clearly than in any others I have made that I have a good strong eye for colour--that I see it fresh, through a grey haze".


Carol (goodreadscomcarolann) | 1210 comments I'm reading Portrait of an Artist: Biography of Georgia O'Keeffe.

She was born in a farmhouse near Sun Praire, Wisconsin in 1887, which is the year the US Senate rejected the right to vote for women. She's the 2nd oldest child & oldest daughter of 8 children (4 boys/ 4 girls); has a great imagination & a loner as a child; Throughout her childhood she liked taking solitary, long walks. She had a strong matriachal family where women were educated & had professions but Georgia identified more with her father (loved the land) than her mother (loved books/education). At 12 yrs decided to become an artist because for her "to be an artist meant she could do as she wished." Her early art education was mostly charcoal drawing from plaster casts or copying artworks in watercolor.

At 15 yrs her family moved to Williamsburg -she was sent to Chatham Episcopal (boarding) School--strict; uniforms, she became impulsive, did pranks, friends called her "Georgie. The principal/teacher Elizabeth May Willis challenged her in school and in the early years of her life (art). She stated that the rest of her life she cared deeply for music, claiming she could have become a musician as easily as a painter and that she didn't know which she valued most -- her ears or her eyes. Georgia almost did not graduate-- took spelling exam 6 times in order to pass it. She gave her classmates her watercolor paintings & tore up the rest because "she didn't want them around to embaress her when she became famous."

At 18 yrs she went to live with aunt & uncle who were walking distance to the Art Institute of Chicago. That following summer Georgia almost died of Typhoid Fever, took until the next fall for her strength to return. Family business not doing well, former teacher made it possible for her to go to NYC with her friends in the New York Art League -- now she was nicknamed "Patsy." Georgia took Portrait & Still Life classes with William Merritt Chase.
"He used his strong, witty personality to provoke the class into painting with individuality and boldness, and into making spirited, interesting canvases." He demanded that his students execute a new painting everyday -- one on top of another, until the canvas became too thick to paint.


Carol (goodreadscomcarolann) | 1210 comments Georgia's in NYC seeing “Avant-Garde” Art!


Auguste Rodin, Hell, c. 1900-1906, pencil and watercolor. André Bromberg Collection (exhibited at 291, 1908)


In 1908, Georgia went to see the controversial drawings of a french sculptor at a little gallery run by photographer Alfred Stieglitz. Nothing like these drawings had ever been shown before. It was the first important exhibition of Rodin's late figure drawings. Her teacher, William Merritt Chase also attended the event and was so upset about the drawings that he argued that "his students would question everything that they have been taught" and banged his hat down so hard that he crushed it. He stormed out of the gallery, vowing to never to return. Stieglitz, a very persuasive debater had won the argument, and intimidated Georgia.

Stieglitz, who studied photography in Berlin in 1880’s and was the first to successfully take photos in the rain, during a snowstorm and at night, returned to America to open a photoengraving business, which was unsuccessful. He was very passionate and embarked on a battle to make the “craft” of photography accepted as a tool of artistic expression. He opened a gallery at 291 Fifth Avenue to exhibit photographs that he felt were “avant-garde.”

Georgia returned to the 291 gallery in April to see the first Matisse exhibit ever held in the US which included Nude in the Forest (1906). After viewing all this “avant garde” art at 291 Gallery, Georgia was trying to decide in her own mind how to express herself. She knew that painting was her passion but she didn’t know what direction to take. She reviewed what was out there at the time:

1) Although she rejected realism taught by Chase, she always praised him for how he stressed that his students should express themselves freely with their individual styles.

2) She didn’t identify with the European Impressionists and their obsession with the changing qualities of light.

3) She wasn’t interested in Henri’s group that focused on social realism.

She returned home to find her family in desperate financial debt. Her parents would not be able to send her back to NYC or her two sisters to finish their education. Her father decided to purchase inexpensive, cement blocks and went into home construction business in hopes of generating income.


message 31: by Heather, Moderator (new)

Heather | 2384 comments I think it is so neat how Georgia could experience such influences in NY! Wow, to see the exhibits of Rodin and Matisse. That would be some education!

I hope she finds her own style eventually now that she has eliminated those styles and techniques that she didn't care for or agree with. Of course, we all know that she does, but it is great hearing your updates, Carol, on how she goes about this.


message 32: by Heather, Moderator (new)

Heather | 2384 comments Yes, I admit that I will be continuing to read Dear Theo for the March Book Challenge. Still loving it!

I think the following statement by Vincent to Theo is a type of foreshadowing, don't you?
"Yes, I think it is a tragedy, the history of great men. They not only meet with constables in their lives, but usually they are dead by the time their work is publicly recognized; and during their lives they are under continuous pressure from the obstacles and difficulties of the struggle for existence."


Dvora | 489 comments Heather, are you familiar with the Van Gogh Gallery website http://www.vggallery.com/ ? Not only do they have all his letters, but also images of many of his paintings. I have been reading through the letters, but would really prefer the new two-volume comprehensive edition with pictures included, but it is too expensive. The website is free and is an excellent resource.
Heather wrote: "Yes, I admit that I will be continuing to read Dear Theo for the March Book Challenge. Still loving it!

I think the following statement by Vincent to Theo is a type of foreshadowing, don't you?
"Y..."



Carol (goodreadscomcarolann) | 1210 comments First Place for Still Life!
< img src="http://www.writedesignonline.com/hist..." />
Georgia O’Keeffe, Untitled, oil, 1908

In 1908, Georgia won the League's William Merritt Chase still-life prize for her oil painting Untitled (Dead Rabbit with Copper Pot). Shortly after, O'Keeffe stated that she had known then that she could never achieve distinction working within this tradition.



< img src="http://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia..." />
William Merritt Chase, Self Portrait, 1915, oil,

Chase became the most important U.S. art teacher of his generation, first at New York's Art Students League and later at his own school, founded in 1896. His teachings, particularly his advocacy of fresh color and bravura technique, greatly influenced the course of early 20th-century U.S. painting; among his students were Georgia O'Keeffe and Charles Demuth.

As a painter, he was very prolific; his 2,000 paintings include portraits, interiors, figure studies, still lifes, and landscapes characterized by bold, spontaneous brushwork.

View his paintings: http://images.google.com/images?hl=en...


message 35: by A. (last edited Mar 01, 2010 08:45AM) (new)

A. (almas) | 240 comments Dvora wrote: "Heather, are you familiar with the Van Gogh Gallery website http://www.vggallery.com/ ? Not only do they have all his letters, but also images of many of his paintings. I have been reading throug..."

I browsed around quickly.

I love the Letter Sketches especially Bird's Nest



It reminded me of a poem I wrote once titled "A Nest In a Falling Tree"


Wonderful site! Thank you Dvora :)


message 36: by Heather, Moderator (new)

Heather | 2384 comments Dvora wrote: "Heather, are you familiar with the Van Gogh Gallery website http://www.vggallery.com/ ? Not only do they have all his letters, but also images of many of his paintings. I have been reading throug..."

THANK YOU, Dvora! I just checked out the gallery and it has everything! In my book, I am still on his early paintings, since he is in transition from drawings to paintings. He is at The Hague. So I looked up his early paintings on the site and it lists all the ones he has been speaking of! Now I can put a picture with the description, thank you so much!


Dvora | 489 comments Heather, you're very welcome!
Heather wrote: "Dvora wrote: "Heather, are you familiar with the Van Gogh Gallery website http://www.vggallery.com/ ? Not only do they have all his letters, but also images of many of his paintings. I have been ..."


Monica | 928 comments The William Merritt Chase gallery got me lost in the Parrish Art Museum/Classes/Trips on Long Island. http://artists.parrishart.org/ I must stop and shuffle some of these papers!!!


message 39: by Fran (last edited Mar 02, 2010 12:16PM) (new)

Fran | 58 comments Mario Vargas Llosa
a biography very well written, though Gauguin's life is somewhat boring, quite incredibly
/ the way to paradiseMario Vargas Llosa


message 40: by Fran (last edited Mar 02, 2010 12:17PM) (new)


Carol (goodreadscomcarolann) | 1210 comments Georgia discovers abstraction through “The Dow Method”.
[image error]
Abstraction IX, 1916

Georgia, now 21, needed to support herself. She knew that she had only two choices: art or marriage. For the last 3 years she had been corresponding with a George Dannenberg from The Art Student League, for whom she deeply cared. She felt that if he proposed to her, she would have accepted and married him. But instead, he sailed to Europe for art and that eliminated her only option for marriage.

She decided to return to Chicago, and began freelancing for the daily newspapers as an illustrator. Because she was fast and accurate, she drew detailed drawings of lace and embroidery for advertisements. Despite the fact that she found this work to be dull and unrewarding, she continued to do it thinking that it was impossible for her to support herself by painting alone. Two years later, she came down with the measles, which temporarily weakened her eyes and ended her career. She returned home to her family to find her mother’s health declining due to tuberculosis.

In 1912 Georgia and her family left Williamsburg and moved to Charlotte where her dad opened a creamery. All the O’Keeffe girls lived with their parents, and were enrolled in The University of Virginia that summer. Anita, Georgia’s younger sister enrolled in a “Drawing 1” class with a professor who had “unusual ideas” about art. Anita insisted that Georgia come to see his strange teachings. Her teacher was Alon Bement of Teachers College, Columbia University in New York. He was an associate of Arthur Wesley Dow whose ways of teaching art in school was revolutionary at the time. He felt that copying nature or the styles of the Masters was no way to teach art. Instead he believed that beauty, not realism, was the true aim of art and Dow’s philosophy started with composition as the essence of beauty. In class, the subject matter is uniquely realized through harmonious arrangements of line, color, and “notan” - the Japanese system of lights and darks. This compositional theory was first developed by Dow's mentor, Ernest Fenollosa, who was himself a scholar and connoisseur of traditional Japanese art, but it was Arthur Wesley Dow who popularized this approach to art education.


< img src="http://www.ipswichmuseum.org/images/p..." />

His books Composition and The Theory and Practice of Teacher’s Art became famous. Georgia signed up for the “Drawing 4” class and learned the principles of abstraction. About it, she said, “it could be used to make every aesthetic decision. It also could be used to make an alphabet that could be arranged and rearranged resulting in a great deal of individualism.”

To see his books:
Composition
http://www.amazon.com/Composition-Und...

The Theory and Practice of Teacher’s Art
http://books.google.com/books?id=oYEW...


Monica | 928 comments For Fran and other Gauguin lovers http://www.goodreads.com/book/show/15...


Carol (goodreadscomcarolann) | 1210 comments From 1912 to 1914 Georgia taught drawing in Amarillo, Texas. She responded strongly to the vast emptiness of the Texas plains. She stated, “that was my country (the southwest), terrible winds and a wonderful emptiness.” For 4 summers (1913-1916) Georgia taught drawing at the University in Charlottesville as a teaching assistant of Bement, who encouraged her to go to New York and study with Arthur Wesley Dow, head of the Fine Arts Department at Columbia. Bement also encouraged her to read Kandinsky’s On the Spiritual in Art and Jerome Eddy’s Cubists and Post Impressionism.

She arrived in New York to study with Dow and found it had changed greatly. New ideas of abstraction, inspired by the 1913 Armory Show, was the topic of discussion. Under Dow’s instruction she developed a respect for the natural forms (like Rousseau) over cubists shattered forms. In passing a classroom, she saw students painting to the somber rhythms coming from a Victrola. By winter, she confessed that she had gone “color mad”. Since Dow shunned violent colors and strong contrasts, Georgia left him and began to educate herself by reading periodicals -- The Masses (Greenwich Village newspaper), Camera Work (Stieglitz quarterly publication), the satirical 291 magazine, and Floyd Dell’s book Women as World Builders; Studies in Modern Feminism. Georgia again visited 291 and saw art of Picasso & Cezanne; Picasso and Braque; John Marin’s watercolors; and Marsden Hartley’s paintings. She realized then that one could make a living by painting as one wished.








In the fall of 1915, Georgia taught art at a teachers college in Columbia, SC. She became absorbed in creating her own art. “It was like learning to walk again.” She wanted to impress Stieglitz because he was the only person who was interested in art in America. She experimented with charcoal and drew abstract shapes, trying to represent her dreams and visions. She mailed them to her Columbia classmate and good friend Anita Pollitzer, who showed the works to Stieglitz. He was impressed, later exhibiting 10 of her drawings in the largest room with 2 other male artists work in the smaller gallery without Georgia's knowledge or permission (and he incorrectly listed her first name as “Virginia”). Embarrassed, she demanded that he end the exhibition, to no avail. The public was shocked by what it perceived as the frank sexuality of her shapes. Stieglitz believed that art was the expression of deep feeling, even sexual feeling, and argued that erotic energy should be expressed in America so to shake the country free of it's repressive Puritan heritige and to liberate it's artists.

Books listed:
Kandinsky, Concerning the Spiritual in Art
http://www.amazon.com/Concerning-Spir...

Jerome Eddy’s Cubists and Post Impressionism.
http://books.google.com/books?id=sdJA...

Women as World Builders; Studies in Modern Feminism by Floyd Dell
http://www.amazon.com/Women-Builders-...


Fran | 58 comments in my opinion the book of kandinsky is not easy to read and difficult to understand , is a very personal theory of art....
the title is wonderful


Fran | 58 comments Barasch is more academic but more understandable


Carol (goodreadscomcarolann) | 1210 comments Fran wrote: "in my opinion the book of kandinsky is not easy to read and difficult to understand , is a very personal theory of art....
the title is wonderful"


I just picked up the Kandinsky tonight -- hopefully it won't be too difficult.


Carol (goodreadscomcarolann) | 1210 comments In 1916, at Texas Teachers College in Canyon, Texas, Georgia became the new art teacher from the East who had very different ways of teaching, which generated much enthusiasm from her students. Georgia felt that her job was not to teach them how to paint pictures but to show them a way of seeing. She exposed them many things from Russian literature to exotic African carvings (that she had seen at 291). She also assigned them reading in the most advanced books on art theory at the time -- Clive Bell's Art, and Willard H. Right's The Creative Will. The town's people thought that she was peculiar and bohemian, but Georgia didn't care. The only person's opinion that she really cared about was Stieglitz’s. His belief in her potential answered her deep need for validation as an artist. Throughout her stay in Texas, the two wrote each other many letters.

Although Stieglitz advised her to work in black and white, Georgia returned to color. First she started by using blue, painting watercolor forms. One morning, she was inspired by the sun rising so she returned to using yellow, green and red. Georgia painted on days when she didn't teach, most of the time working in watercolors because she lacked the time required for oils. Her daring colors and unusual forms startled some viewers but Georgia defended her work by stating “if you want a replica of nature then you should take a photograph.”

FIRST SOLO EXHIBIT!
[image error]
On April 3, 1917, Stieglitz opened Georgia's first solo show which featured Texas watercolors, some charcoals and oils and a plasticine sculpture representing a sensitively molded phallic form. A review in the Christian Science Monitor stated "(She) has found expression in delicately veiled symbolism for "what every woman knows," but what women heretofore kept to themselves . . . the loneliness and privation which her emotional nature must have suffered put their impress on everything she does… Perhaps for the first time in art’s history, the style is the women."

[image error]
Stieglitz was fond of one of one blue watercolors which he hung over his table at 291 during the winter. He interpreted the 2 forms as the dichotomy of male and female sensibilities. That spring of 1917, was sadly the last issue of Stieglitz’s publication Camera Work due to lack of subscribers. Three days after her show opened, the US entered World War I.


message 49: by Heather, Moderator (new)

Heather | 2384 comments VERY fascinating! I love her works that you have included in your commentary!


Fran | 58 comments Carol wrote: "Fran wrote: "in my opinion the book of kandinsky is not easy to read and difficult to understand , is a very personal theory of art....
the title is wonderful"

I just picked up the Kandinsky tonig..."



I'll have to read it again.............


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