Glens Falls (NY) Online Book Discussion Group discussion

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ABOUT BOOKS AND READING > What are U reading these days? (PART SIX) (2010)

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message 1001: by Jim (new)

Jim (JimMacLachlan) | 4339 comments You sound like my wife, Jackie. Did you two compare notes or is this just a wife/mother thing?
;-)

Thanks.


message 1002: by Jackie (new)

Jackie (thelastwolf) | 4043 comments LOL
It's just something we know to be true. Mothers are like that, ;)


message 1003: by Nina (new)

Nina | 2935 comments Jim, My prescription: chicken soup for the stomach and a good book to take your mind off the misery. nina


message 1004: by Jackie (new)

Jackie (thelastwolf) | 4043 comments Starting The Darkest Road tonight, #3 in the Fionavar Tapestry.

Just finished The Wandering Fire, #2, and it was outstanding. I've seen this trilogy compared to LOTR and I must confess, it's better than LOTR. Yes, you heard right. It is that good. Kay blends Celtic mythology and Arthurian legend seamlessly into one amazing story.


message 1005: by Joy H., Group Founder (last edited Dec 03, 2010 05:59PM) (new)

Joy H. (JoyofGlensFalls) | 12616 comments Jackie wrote: "Starting The Darkest Road tonight, #3 in the Fionavar Tapestry.
Just finished The Wandering Fire, #2, and it was outstanding. I've seen this trilogy compared to LOTR and I must co..."


From various reviews, I see that these books have many fans. At Amazon, one of them says:
==========================================================
RE: "The Fionavar Tapestry" trilogy:
"There are many threads to this tapestry and Kay [author, [author:Guy Gavriel Kay|60177]], as usual, weaves them together in ways that can render the reader breathless with wonder over his stunning mastery of his art as he brings this magnificent saga to a close. The celtic lore of Arthur Pendragon, Guinivere, Lancelot du Lac and the dog Cavall are irredescent threads that glisten like teardrops throughout the weave for they are so heartbreaking and yet beautiful. Kay's inclusion of these figures from arthurian legend in this story adds a new dimension to a mythos that has lingered in the hearts and history of the celts."
FROM: http://www.amazon.com/Darkest-Road-Fi...
==========================================================


message 1006: by Katherine (new)

Katherine Totten (Katherine42) | 199 comments Just finished Primal Fear by Willam Diehl. The book is very close to the Richard Gere/Edward Norton movie with a few extras thrown in.
Although I can't imagine where these characters will go next, I'll be reserving the next installment at the library.


message 1007: by Joy H., Group Founder (last edited Dec 05, 2010 03:10PM) (new)

Joy H. (JoyofGlensFalls) | 12616 comments Katherine wrote: "Just finished Primal Fear by Willam Diehl. The book is very close to the Richard Gere/Edward Norton movie with a few extras thrown in.
Although I can't imagine where these characters will go next, I'll be reserving the next installment at the library."


The IMDb trivia for the movie, "Primal Fear" (1996) says:
=========================================================
"When trying out for the role of the altar boy ["Aaron"], Edward Norton went into the audition in character, complete with stutters and all, and this won his role."

"2,100 actors auditioned for the role of Aaron Stampler - Matt Damon was one of them."
FROM: http://www.imdb.com/title/tt0117381/t...
=========================================================

Below is a link to the Netflix description of "Primal Fear":
http://movies.netflix.com/Movie/Prima...
It says that the movie is a "twisty thriller".

Katherine, is the book (Primal Fear) or the movie part of a series?


message 1008: by Nina (new)

Nina | 2935 comments I just finished reading, "The School of Essential Ingredients," by Erica Bauermeister and have started re-reading it. It was so interesting and pleasant I don't want to let it go. nina


message 1009: by Joy H., Group Founder (new)

Joy H. (JoyofGlensFalls) | 12616 comments Nina wrote: "I just finished reading, "The School of Essential Ingredients," by Erica Bauermeister and have started re-reading it. It was so interesting and pleasant I don't want to let it go. nina"

Nina, I see that the GR member reviews of The School of Essential Ingredients were mostly thumbs-up!

Traci's review says:
=========================================================
"The School of Essential Ingredients is more than a cooking school. Chef and instructor Lillian proves it's a chance to rediscover your own life. The School of Essential Ingredients allows readers a peak into the life of each student and we watch with pleasure as their worlds realign and come together.

"While nothing earth-shattering really happnes here, the pacing is beautiful--it reads so quickly, but has that lovely, languid slowness that I crave on a January afternoon. This is a perfect read for a snow-bound day at home."
FROM: http://www.goodreads.com/review/show/...
==========================================================


message 1010: by Katherine (new)

Katherine Totten (Katherine42) | 199 comments Joy H. wrote: "Katherine wrote: "Just finished Primal Fear by Willam Diehl. The book is very close to the Richard Gere/Edward Norton movie with a few extras thrown in.
Although I can't imagine where these charac..."


Show of Evil is a novel that picks up the story ten years later.


message 1011: by Joy H., Group Founder (new)

Joy H. (JoyofGlensFalls) | 12616 comments Katherine wrote: "Show of Evil is a novel that picks up the story ten years later."

Thanks, Katherine. I see that the GR description of Show of Evil (1995) says: "This is the stunning sequel to Primal Fear."


message 1012: by Joy H., Group Founder (last edited Dec 07, 2010 07:11AM) (new)

Joy H. (JoyofGlensFalls) | 12616 comments I recently finished reading The Elephant to Hollywood, an autobiography by one of my favorite actors, Michael Caine. The book has just come out; it was first published in September of this year (2010). I borrowed it from our public library. I'm rating this book 5 stars because I was so happy to find a book which I enjoyed thoroughly. (Those are few and far between these days.)

The word "Elephant" refers to the area of London where Caine grew up. This is a true rags to riches story.

Below is an excerpt from the GR description:
============================================================
"Now he shares the spectacular story of his life, from his humble upbringing in London's poverty-stricken Elephant and Castle, his military service, touching marriage and family life, and lively adventures with friends, to legendary meetings with fellow stars, forays as a restaurateur, and hilarious off-screen encounters from his glittering five-decade career. Caine brings his gift for storytelling and his insider's view to a tale that is funny, warm, and deeply honest."
=========================================================

That's as good a description as any I could write.

Caine is married to a beautiful Indian woman whom he first saw on a TV commercial. He was so taken in by her beauty that he found a way to meet her. They fell in love and are still married after 37 years. Below is a link to a photo of her and Michael:
http://images2.fanpop.com/images/phot...
His wife's name is Shakira.

My favorite film with Michael Caine is "Educating Rita" (1983). I believe that's one of his favorites too.
http://www.imdb.com/title/tt0085478/
http://movies.netflix.com/Movie/Educa...
"The romantic comedy earned a trio of BAFTA Awards (including Best Film), a pair of Golden Globes and three Oscar nominations."
The film is streamable from Netflix. Hmmm, I think I might watch it again. :)


message 1013: by Joy H., Group Founder (last edited Dec 07, 2010 07:38AM) (new)

Joy H. (JoyofGlensFalls) | 12616 comments PS-Michael Caine's real name is Maurice Joseph Micklewhite. Wiki says: "Unlike many actors who adopt their stage name for everyday use, Caine still uses his real name when he is not working."
FROM: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Michael_...


message 1014: by Nina (new)

Nina | 2935 comments Joy,

I once heard Michael Caine interviewed and the question asked him was, "Which place do you prefer to live, London or LA?" His reply I have never forgotten.

He said, "I miss where I'm not." nina


message 1015: by Joy H., Group Founder (new)

Joy H. (JoyofGlensFalls) | 12616 comments Nina, that's an excellent reply from Michael Caine. His comments are always interesting.


message 1016: by Nina (new)

Nina | 2935 comments I am not reading our book club selection for next month as I think it is boring. Have you read, "Homer and Langley," by Doctorow? Good writer but uninteresting subject to me. nina


message 1017: by Joy H., Group Founder (last edited Dec 08, 2010 06:35PM) (new)

Joy H. (JoyofGlensFalls) | 12616 comments Nina wrote: "... Have you read, "Homer and Langley," by Doctorow? Good writer but uninteresting subject to me. nina"

Haven't read Homer and Langley by E.L. Doctorow. One of the GR reviewers (Nick) calls it an "excursion into madness". See his review here:
http://www.goodreads.com/review/show/...

Another GR review (by Cassy) says: "This book is essentially the rambling of an old, blind man, Homer as he reflects back on his life spent with his trusty brother, Langley in their family’s mansion in New York City."
See Cassy's review here:
http://www.goodreads.com/review/show/...

If I ever do read anything by Doctorow, the first book would be Ragtime because I enjoyed the film (which concentrates on just one of the several narrative threads). Here's my review:
http://www.goodreads.com/review/show/...


message 1018: by Werner (new)

Werner | 1714 comments The book I'd intended to take along for travel reading on a plane trip this month was The Host by Stephenie Meyer --partly because it's thick, and partly because my oldest daughter (who gave it to me earlier this year) has been champing at the bit for me to read it. As it happened, our travel plans had to be changed at the last moment, and we'll be staying home for Christmas; but since I'd promised her I would, I'm going ahead and reading it anyway. I started on it today, and I'm already enthralled!


message 1019: by Jackie (new)

Jackie (thelastwolf) | 4043 comments I read it because I heard they were making a movie of it. I liked it, it was different.


message 1020: by Joy H., Group Founder (last edited Dec 10, 2010 04:36PM) (new)

Joy H. (JoyofGlensFalls) | 12616 comments Here are the links, for reference:
The Host by Stephenie Meyer (who also wrote Twilight)


message 1021: by Jackie (new)

Jackie (thelastwolf) | 4043 comments It's nothing like Twilight. I thought I'd say that because a lot of people are turned off by Twilight and I wouldn't want anyone to be discouraged by that.


message 1022: by Joy H., Group Founder (new)

Joy H. (JoyofGlensFalls) | 12616 comments Jackie wrote: "It's nothing like Twilight. I thought I'd say that because a lot of people are turned off by Twilight and I wouldn't want anyone to be discouraged by that."

Thanks for pointing that out, Jackie. I've edited my post to clarify it.


message 1023: by Jackie (last edited Dec 10, 2010 04:44PM) (new)

Jackie (thelastwolf) | 4043 comments I didn't mean for you to edit your post. Just wanted it known that it's not a Twilight-ish novel. All too often authors use a similar format for their books, so if a person doesn't like a particular book, they probably won't like the others the author writes.
My point is that whether we like Twilight or not, The Host is a very different kind of book.


message 1024: by Joy H., Group Founder (new)

Joy H. (JoyofGlensFalls) | 12616 comments Jackie, my post needed clarifying anyway. :)


message 1025: by Werner (new)

Werner | 1714 comments Yes, the Twilight series is supernatural fiction with a focus on vampires and werewolves, while The Host is science fiction, completely unrelated to the Twilight scenario. Its premise is that near-future Earth has been largely taken over by a parasitic alien species (very similar in some ways to the Gh'oul race on the TV series Stargate!) who take over the bodies of human "hosts." But some hosts fight back; and some rebel "wild" humans remain unassimilated.


message 1026: by Jim (new)

Jim (JimMacLachlan) | 4339 comments Sort of like The Puppet Masters by Robert A. Heinlein? I actually have The Host here & was thinking of getting rid of it since I didn't care for "Twilight". I read the first book, but couldn't bear to read the rest. I had no interest in the movies either.


message 1027: by Jackie (new)

Jackie (thelastwolf) | 4043 comments Werner, I hadn't thought of it, but yes, the alien race is similar to the Goa'uld. I'm a huge 'Gate fan. I love how the Goa'uld were ancient 'gods' from mythology, even though they were power-hungry and insane. Great storytelling, unique.


message 1028: by Werner (new)

Werner | 1714 comments Jackie, I heartily agree! I'm a Stargate fan myself; loved both the original movie and the series, though of late years I haven't been able to watch the latter regularly, and have lost track of the continuing storylines. (Wasn't sure I spelled Goa'uld correctly, though; I'd never seen it written. I always tended to think of them as Gh'oul, since they're a pretty ghoulish species. Their cousins the Tokra are much nicer, though; who knows, maybe in this book Wanderer and her "host" will wind up with a similar amicable accommodation. :-) )

Jim, I haven't read The Puppet Masters, but I think the premises are similar. Readers' reactions to different books by the same author can be sharply different, especially when the two books are in very different genres. So not liking the Twilight series isn't necessarily predictive of how you'd respond to The Host. As I recall, one thing that was a turn-off to you with the former was the teenage-girl narrative voice. The narrative voice here (so far) is that of a long-lived parasitic alien, who's melded to a great extent with the consciousness and memory of a woman who's young, but past her teen years. Her voice is significantly different from Bella's; and the dream-consciousness of her "host," Melanie, also doesn't sound --to me, anyway-- much like Bella's.


message 1029: by Jim (new)

Jim (JimMacLachlan) | 4339 comments I'll keep it around & give it a try then, Werner. Yes, I wanted to slap most of the characters in Twilight, especially Bella.

I've never seen Stargate, but I liked "The Puppet Masters".


message 1030: by Werner (new)

Werner | 1714 comments Whenever you try it (The Host), Jim, I'll be interested in what you think of it!


message 1031: by Jackie (new)

Jackie (thelastwolf) | 4043 comments And I'll be awaiting what you both think of it.


message 1032: by Joy H., Group Founder (last edited Dec 12, 2010 07:01AM) (new)

Joy H. (JoyofGlensFalls) | 12616 comments I went looking for a cozy mystery similar to Dorothy Gilman's Mrs. Pollifax series. I found Aunt Dimity and the Next of Kin by Nancy Atherton. It's an uncomplicated mystery which kept me engaged most of the time. I skimmed over parts which dealt with uninteresting side events. The mystery was good enough to encourage me to now try Aunt Dimity's Good Deed. The stories are told in the first person by Aunt Dimity's niece. I find that first person narratives draw me in faster.

PS-Aunt Dimity turns out to be a deceased aunt with whom the niece communicates for advice. A bit hokey, but it works. :)

PPS-One of the GR reviewers says: "Some of the mysteries are more about figuring out a family secret rather than a murder." This is true of this "next of kin" story.


message 1033: by Jim (new)

Jim (JimMacLachlan) | 4339 comments Joy, you might want to try Outfoxed or Hotspur by Rita Mae Brown. They're about "Sister" Jane, the 70 year old master of a hunt in VA who solves murder mysteries. Mom liked them & passed them along to us. I see from GR, that Brown has written a lot of other mysteries, too. At a glance, they seem to have an animal slant to them.


message 1034: by Joy H., Group Founder (new)

Joy H. (JoyofGlensFalls) | 12616 comments Thanks, Jim. I'll make note of your recommendations and check them out at our local library.


message 1035: by Werner (new)

Werner | 1714 comments Re the animal slant to many of Brown's mysteries, I haven't read any of her work; but being a librarian, I've read quite a few reviews of her novels in the library trade journals. One of her mystery series is as much about her amateur sleuth's cats as about the human protagonist; sort of like the animals in Bunnicula, these cats are portrayed as much more intelligent and clued-in to human affairs than any realistic animals would be. (They intentionally help solve the mysteries, for instance.)


message 1036: by Joy H., Group Founder (last edited Dec 13, 2010 07:49AM) (new)

Joy H. (JoyofGlensFalls) | 12616 comments Werner wrote: "Re the animal slant to many of Brown's mysteries ..."

Werner, thanks for adding that info.
Below are some excerpts from the GR description of Outfoxed:
===========================================================
"As always, her glimpses of the world through the eyes of animal characters make her tale even more compelling..."

"...her animals give us humans a second look at ourselves, revealing Rita Mae Brown's keen understanding of human nature. Clearly, that understanding is what makes her novels so unforgettable..."

"all the way down to the crow who tips off the hounds on where to find the fox."
==========================================================


message 1037: by Mary JL (new)

Mary JL (MaryJL) | 394 comments Just started a new mystery, Die Trying by Lee Child. Starting out well.


message 1038: by Nina (new)

Nina | 2935 comments jim,

I know those cones are absolutely a nessacity ubt I am always so sorry for the animal. Please extend my sympathy to lilly. nina


message 1039: by Joy H., Group Founder (new)

Joy H. (JoyofGlensFalls) | 12616 comments Mary JL wrote: "Just started a new mystery, Die Trying by Lee Child. Starting out well."

Mary JL, I browsed some of the GR reviews of Die Trying. One review made me smile. It said:
======================================================
"AHHHHH this book made me become so enamored of the series that my heart starts beating faster when I passed the Lee Child shelf in the library. ... I feel like an 8 year old boy reading Batman comics for the first time, enthusiastically filing my hero’s survival techniques in my little brain, nevermind the fact that they would never work in the real world."
From: K's review at: http://www.goodreads.com/review/show/...
=========================================================


message 1040: by Jackie (new)

Jackie (thelastwolf) | 4043 comments I just finished The Fionavar Tapestry, truly an epic masterpiece.

I'll be starting A Game of Thrones by George R.R. Martin later tonight in anticipation of the HBO series slated to premiere in April.


message 1041: by Jim (new)

Jim (JimMacLachlan) | 4339 comments I just finished Sharpe's Tiger. Very good. Can't wait to read the rest of the series. I have the first 5 books, I think. I've read the 5th one, too.

Richard Sharpe is a fictional British soldier who participates in many of the pivotal battles of the empire around the 1800's. Bernard Cornwell takes some liberties with historical fact, but explains when & where in the afterword. Usually he sticks to the facts & often the characters are actual historical figures.

I like this kind of historical fiction. History told from the POV of a common British soldier is just awesome. It really makes the past come alive & gives me a way to relate to it. I remember it better.


message 1042: by Mary JL (new)

Mary JL (MaryJL) | 394 comments Jim: I just picked up the first Sharpe book at a used book sale and will be giving the series a try. I have heard good things about the series!


message 1043: by Jim (new)

Jim (JimMacLachlan) | 4339 comments I'll be interested to hear what you think. I've been told this isn't the best of the series, though.


message 1044: by Joy H., Group Founder (new)

Joy H. (JoyofGlensFalls) | 12616 comments Jackie wrote: "I just finished The Fionavar Tapestry, truly an epic masterpiece.
I'll be starting A Game of Thrones by George R.R. Martin later tonight in anticipation of the HBO series..."


Jackie, I see (at the GR description) that Game of Thrones (1996) has won several awards.
Literary awards:
Nebula Award Nominee (1998)
Locus Award for Best Fantasy Novel (1997)
World Fantasy Award Nominee for Best Novel (1997)


message 1045: by Joy H., Group Founder (last edited Dec 15, 2010 06:01AM) (new)

Joy H. (JoyofGlensFalls) | 12616 comments Jim wrote: "I just finished Sharpe's Tiger. Very good. Can't wait to read the rest of the series. I have the first 5 books, I think. I've read the 5th one, too. Richard Sharpe is a fiction..."

Jim, thanks for the review. I've always enjoyed historical fiction.


message 1046: by Jackie (last edited Dec 15, 2010 08:47AM) (new)

Jackie (thelastwolf) | 4043 comments Here's an Inside Look at A Game of Thrones from HBO:
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=GViug6...

It looks so good!


message 1047: by Nina (new)

Nina | 2935 comments I am wondering if the Sharpe series is what the mini- series on Masterpiece Theater of that name is based upon??? nina


message 1048: by Jim (new)

Jim (JimMacLachlan) | 4339 comments Yes, Nina. PBS / Masterpiece Theater did them according to a Google search. There is more on them here:
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Richard_...

More specific to the shows:
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Category...


message 1049: by Joy H., Group Founder (new)

Joy H. (JoyofGlensFalls) | 12616 comments Jackie wrote: "Here's an Inside Look at A Game of Thrones from HBO:
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=GViug6...
It looks so good!"


Just found this post. Thanks, Jackie. I don't know why I didn't get a notice about the posting.


message 1050: by Joy H., Group Founder (last edited Dec 23, 2010 08:27AM) (new)

Joy H. (JoyofGlensFalls) | 12616 comments Nina wrote: "I am wondering if the Sharpe series is what the mini- series on Masterpiece Theater of that name is based upon??? nina"

Nina, a member review at Netflix said:
=========================================================
"The "Sharpe's" series was made for BBC television starting in the 90s."

"Sharpe's Series in order 1) Rifles, 2) Eagle, 3) Company, 4) Enemy, 5) Honor, 6) Gold, 7) Battle, 8) Sword, 9) Regiment, 10) Siege, 11) Mission, 12) Revenge, 13) Justice, 14) Waterloo (of course)"

FROM: http://movies.netflix.com/Movie/Sharp...
==========================================================

Also see the Netflix listings at:
http://www.netflix.com/Search?oq=&amp...
http://www.netflix.com/Search?oq=&amp...


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Glens Falls (NY) Online Book Discussion Group

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