The History Book Club discussion

459 views
AFRICA > HISTORY OF AFRICA

Comments (showing 51-94 of 94) (94 new)    post a comment »
« previous 1 2 next »
dateDown arrow    newest »

message 51: by Jill, Assisting Moderator - Military Hist L/Global NF/Eur/Brit/Music (new)

Jill Hutchinson (Bucs1960) | 12532 comments Mod
Foxessa:
Don't forget to add the links to the books, authors and author's picture if available. The books you cited should look like this:
Africa A Biography of the Continent by John Reader by John Reader
West Africa before the Colonial Era A History to 1850 by Basil Davidson by Basil DavidsonBasil Davidson


message 52: by Jim (new)

Jim (mijtoba) | 5 comments The White Nile by Alan Moorehead by Alan Morehead The Zulu War A Pictorial History by Michael Barthorp by Michael Barthorp


message 53: by Alisa (new)

Alisa (MsTaz) | 5541 comments Jim, thanks for posting these recommendations. Don't forget to also use the photo and hyperlinks for the authors in addition to the book cover when posting. Thanks!
The White Nile by Alan Moorehead by Alan MooreheadAlan Moorehead
The Zulu War A Pictorial History by Michael Barthorp by Michael Barthorp


message 54: by Paula (new)

Paula Froelich | 5 comments Michela Wrong was the FT corrs for Africa for many years and wrote the most amazing books on Congo, Kenya and eritrea... They actually read like novels. A MUST read for modern Africa buffsMichela WrongI Didn't Do It for YouIn the Footsteps of Mr. Kurtz: Living on the Brink of Disaster in theIt's Our Turn to Eat


message 55: by Paula (new)

Paula Froelich | 5 comments Alisa - thanks.. am new-ish to all of this... and a bit of a computer dolt...


message 56: by Bentley, Group Founder, Leader, Chief (new)

Bentley | 32378 comments Mod
Hello Paula,

You might want to introduce yourself on the introduction thread. The mods then tend to give helpful hints so that you are aware of the rules and guidelines. When you get a chance, please stop by that thread so that we know something neat about you and can say hello. We have no self promotion but you can always tell us something neat about yourself like you like to go sailing in your freetime or skateboard or relax listening to rock. Just some innocuous detail; they are always fun to hear.

You also may have noticed that folks seem to add bookcovers, then the author's photo if available and always the author's link which is the author's name in linkable text when talking about books and authors here. That is because that is something we require here for a variety of reasons.

So when citing books, please have them look like this:

The First World War by John Keegan by John KeeganJohn Keegan

In the case of the books you cited: here is what that citation should look like:

I Didn't Do It for You by Michela Wrong In the Footsteps of Mr. Kurtz Living on the Brink of Disaster in the by Michela Wrong It's Our Turn to Eat by Michela Wrong by Michela Wrong


message 57: by Paula (new)

Paula Froelich | 5 comments Thanks bentley.. how do you add the book cover?


message 58: by André (last edited Nov 05, 2011 10:26AM) (new)

André (AndrH) | 2618 comments Paula wrote: "Thanks bentley.. how do you add the book cover?"

Hi Paula, just click on the add/author link right above the comment space and type in the book title and or author's name. The book appears in one or more editions. Check the one you want, click "book cover" and there you have it.


message 59: by Bentley, Group Founder, Leader, Chief (new)

Bentley | 32378 comments Mod
Paula, you will get the hang of it: remember book cover, author's photo when available and always the author's link (3 things).

Here are some very detailed directions in the folder called Help Desk in the thread called Mechanics of the Board:

http://www.goodreads.com/topic/show/2...


message 60: by Jim (new)

Jim (mijtoba) | 5 comments Alisa wrote: "Jim, thanks for posting these recommendations. Don't forget to also use the photo and hyperlinks for the authors in addition to the book cover when posting. Thanks!
[bookcover:The White Nile|345..."

Thanks Alisa, I also am a newbie. I think I'm getting it figured out now.


message 61: by Alisa (new)

Alisa (MsTaz) | 5541 comments Jim, excellent. Let us know if you need a hand. You can always practice over on the mechanics of the board thread that Bentley posted above. It's a snap once you get it down.


message 62: by Jim (new)

Jim (mijtoba) | 5 comments If interested in early 20th century game management in east Africa, this book is compiled from notes of a white hunter who worked with the Kenya Game Dept prior to 1949.
White Hunter by John A. Hunter by John A. Hunter


message 63: by 'Aussie Rick' (new)

'Aussie Rick' (AussieRick) Here is a new book covering a terrible and sometimes forgotten conflict in Africa:


The Struggle for Modern Nigeria by Michael Gould by Michael Gould
Description:
International media coverage in the 1960s and early 1970s represented the Biafran War, in which the state of Biafra attempted to secede from the Nigerian Federation, as a grand humanitarian disaster, characterised by sustained conflict, starvation and genocide. Using interviews and newly-released archival material, Michael Gould questions this depiction, examining the role of foreign parties in the conflict and the impact of propaganda upon its international reception both during and after the war. Envisaged initially by both sides as a short conflict, the war confounded all expectations, stretching on for four years. It was a 'brother's war', one which divided families, and was characterised overwhelmingly by both sides' reluctance to enter into hostilities. This book seeks to answer some of the most fundamental questions surrounding the conflict, including how this avoidable conflict came about, why the war became so drawn-out and how the leadership of the opposing Generals Ojukwu, who led the Biafran revolt and Gowon, who was President of the Nigerian Federation, defined the conflict. In the process, Gould offers a radical reappraisal of the many entrenched conceptions which currently surround the conflict. This book will be essential reading for all students of African history and politics, and post-colonial studies.


message 64: by Bentley, Group Founder, Leader, Chief (new)

Bentley | 32378 comments Mod
Thanks Aussie Rick


message 65: by Jill, Assisting Moderator - Military Hist L/Global NF/Eur/Brit/Music (new)

Jill Hutchinson (Bucs1960) | 12532 comments Mod
This book explores the terrible history of the Atlantic slave trade from its origins in the 15th century to its gradual dissolution in the early 1800s. It is very graphic and features accounts of life in the African trading posts and aboard slave ships.

Sins of the Fathers The Atlantic Slave Trade, 1441-1807 by James Pope-Hennessy by James Pope-Hennessy


message 66: by 'Aussie Rick' (new)

'Aussie Rick' (AussieRick) Looks like a very interesting book Jill.


message 67: by Nicole (new)

Nicole I am just finishing up The Teeth May Smile but the Heart does not Forget by Andrew Rice. It is a very good book about the history of Uganda during the Idi Amin era and a man's (Duncan Laki) search for his father's killer and the trial that results. I find it quite well written and though it jumps between the history part and Duncan's part you don't lose the thread of either story.

Another I just bought is Africa: Altered States, Ordinary Miracles. I found it on Goodreads but can't remember if it was in this club or another. It was in my possession for about 20 minutes before my boss borrowed it to read on her holidays. :)

The Teeth May Smile but the Heart Does Not Forget by Andrew Rice by Andrew Rice (no photo)

Africa Altered States, Ordinary Miracles by Richard Dowden by Richard Dowden (no photo)


message 68: by Becky (last edited May 22, 2012 04:11PM) (new)

Becky (httpsbeckylindrooswordpresscom) | 1220 comments I am so curious about the history of Africa - I've read some but not much. The books usually tend to be about individual countries or specific incidents. Another source is memoirs and travelogues which often include quite a little bit of history. That said ... an oldie now I suppose but I could definitely recommend:

King Leopold's Ghost by Adam Hochschild

King Leopold's Ghost A Story of Greed, Terror and Heroism in Colonial Africa by Adam Hochschild by Adam HochschildAdam Hochschild

Synopsis from Goodreads
In the 1880s, as the European powers were carving up Africa, King Leopold II of Belgium seized for himself the vast and mostly unexplored territory surrounding the Congo River. Carrying out a genocidal plundering of the Congo, he looted its rubber, brutalized its people, and ultimately slashed its population by ten million--all the while shrewdly cultivating his reputation as a great humanitarian. Heroic efforts to expose these crimes eventually led to the first great human rights movement of the twentieth century, in which everyone from Mark Twain to the Archbishop of Canterbury participated. King Leopold's Ghost is the haunting account of a megalomaniac of monstrous proportions, a man as cunning, charming, and cruel as any of the great Shakespearean villains. It is also the deeply moving portrait of those who fought Leopold: a brave handful of missionaries, travelers, and young idealists who went to Africa for work or adventure and unexpectedly found themselves witnesses to a holocaust. Adam Hochschild brings this largely untold story alive with the wit and skill of a Barbara Tuchman. Like her, he knows that history often provides a far richer cast of characters than any novelist could invent. Chief among them is Edmund Morel, a young British shipping agent who went on to lead the international crusade against Leopold. Another hero of this tale, the Irish patriot Roger Casement, ended his life on a London gallows. Two courageous black Americans, George Washington Williams and William Sheppard, risked much to bring evidence of the Congo atrocities to the outside world. Sailing into the middle of the story was a young Congo River steamboat officer named Joseph Conrad. And looming above them all, the duplicitous billionaire King Leopold II. With great power and compassion, King Leopold's Ghost will brand the tragedy of the Congo--too long forgotten--onto the conscience of the West

Review Hochschild has not one word of moral assessment, rather, he lets the facts speak for themselves and that works as a very powerful indictment of the Belgian regime and its horrors in the use of the Congo as Leopold's private property.


message 70: by Jill, Assisting Moderator - Military Hist L/Global NF/Eur/Brit/Music (last edited May 22, 2012 09:52AM) (new)

Jill Hutchinson (Bucs1960) | 12532 comments Mod
Kalliope - when mentioning a book, please use the guidelines for citations. These include the book cover (in the case of the book you cited it is not available so the link is used), the authors photo if available and the authors link. The book you cited should look like this:

Africa: The People And Politics Of An Emerging Continent (no photo available) by Sanford J. Ungar (no photo available)


Please visit our thread cited below for full explanation of our guidelines....and thank you for your participation.

http://www.goodreads.com/topic/show/2...


message 71: by Kalliope (new)

Kalliope Jill wrote: "Kalliope - when mentioning a book, please use the guidelines for citations. These include the book cover (in the case of the book you cited it is not available so the link is used), the authors pho..."

Ok, Thank you. Will do next time.


message 72: by Alisa (new)

Alisa (MsTaz) | 5541 comments Another Day of Life

Another Day of Life by Ryszard Kapuściński by Ryszard KapuścińskiRyszard Kapuściński

Synopsis
In 1975, Angola was tumbling into pandemonium; everyone who could was packing crates, desperate to abandon the beleaguered colony. With his trademark bravura, Ryszard Kapuscinski went the other way, begging his was from Lisbon and comfort to Luanda—once famed as Africa's Rio de Janeiro—and chaos.

Angola, a slave colony later given over to mining and plantations, was a promised land for generations of poor Portuguese. It had belonged to Portugal since before there were English-speakers in North America. After the collapse of the fascist dictatorship in Portugal in 1974, Angola was brusquely cut loose, spurring the catastrophe of a still-ongoing civil war. Kapuscinski plunged right into the middle of the drama, driving past thousands of haphazardly placed check-points, where using the wrong shibboleth was a matter of life and death; recording his imporessions of the young soldiers—from Cuba, Angola, South Africa, Portugal—fighting a nebulous war with global repercussions; and examining the peculiar brutality of a country surprised and divided by its newfound freedom.

Translated from the Polish by William R. Brand and Katarzyna Mroczkowska-Brand.


message 73: by Noirfifre (last edited Jun 27, 2013 07:14PM) (new)

Noirfifre | 51 comments How Europe Underdeveloped Africa

How Europe Underdeveloped Africa by Walter Rodney by Walter Rodney (no photo)


Summary

This book derives from a concern with the contemporary African situation. It delves into the past only because otherwise it would be impossible to understand how the present came into being and what the trends are for the near future. In the search for an understanding of what is now called “underdevelopment” in Africa, the limits of enquiry have had to be fixed as far apart as the fifteenth century, on the one hand and the end of the colonial period, on the other hand.

Ideally, an analysis of underdevelopment should come even closer to the present than the end of the colonial period in the 1960s. The phenomenon of neo-colonialism cries out for extensive investigation in order to formulate the strategy and tactics of African emancipation and development. This study does not go that far, but at least certain
solutions are implicit in a correct historical evaluation, just as given medical remedies are indicated or contra-indicated by a correct diagnosis of a patient’s condition and an accurate case-history.


Hopefully, the facts and interpretation that follow will make a small contribution towards reinforcing the conclusion that African development is possible only on the basis of a radical break with the international capitalist system, which has been the principal agency of underdevelopment of Africa over the last five centuries.


message 74: by Bentley, Group Founder, Leader, Chief (new)

Bentley | 32378 comments Mod
Thank you Marren - look at how Alisa adds books - you might want to master the moderator style and then the group will know what the book is about. You can use the goodreads write up.


message 75: by Noirfifre (new)

Noirfifre | 51 comments Got you Bentley.


message 76: by Jill, Assisting Moderator - Military Hist L/Global NF/Eur/Brit/Music (new)

Jill Hutchinson (Bucs1960) | 12532 comments Mod
Africa at the height of colonialism in 1914.




message 77: by Bryan, Honorary Contributor - EMERITUS (new)

Bryan Craig | 11652 comments Mod
It really shows how much the French were involved.


message 78: by Jill, Assisting Moderator - Military Hist L/Global NF/Eur/Brit/Music (new)

Jill Hutchinson (Bucs1960) | 12532 comments Mod
I was surprised at the lack of Spanish territory....just one little corner. Belgium only had one possession but it was worth a fortune....the Congo.


message 79: by Nancy (new)

Nancy Burns | 69 comments I read this book in DUTCH but is has been translated into English this year!

This is an epic book, yet very readable and profoundly emotional. It is the winner of the Prix Medicis essai 2012 (FR) and the AKO Literature Prize 2010 (NL) and traces the fate of one of the world’s most important countries: the Democratic Republic of Congo.

Van Reybrouck’s strength is his ability to write this history in such a way that you think you are reading a great novel.

It's on my TOP TEN LIST....already!

Congo Een geschiedenis by David Van Reybrouck David Van Reybrouck David Van Reybrouck


message 80: by Bentley, Group Founder, Leader, Chief (new)

Bentley | 32378 comments Mod
Thank you so much Nancy for your post and I am impressed that you read this in Dutch. This is not a book that I was familiar with.


message 81: by Nancy (new)

Nancy Burns | 69 comments If you are interested in more comments about the book I would be happy to send you in a message the link to my review. It would give you a general impression of the book.


message 82: by Bentley, Group Founder, Leader, Chief (last edited Apr 04, 2014 01:06AM) (new)

Bentley | 32378 comments Mod
That is fine Nancy thank you. I was also trying to fix your citation - very good try - but when there is no author's photo - we simply place (no photo) at the end. We do not allow links to reviews here - self promotion. You are always able to do a copy and paste from your review and post it here but no message links.

Congo by David Van Reybrouck by David Van Reybrouck (no photo)


message 83: by Nancy (new)

Nancy Burns | 69 comments Thanks for the correction and I was aware of the non promotion rule. Review is on Goodreads and must start my next history book: "La Chinafriqe" It is in French and will explain the appetite China has for Africa!
La Chinafrique Quand la Chine fait main basse sur le continent noir (Documents Français) (French Edition) by Michel Beuret Michel Beuret (no photo)


message 84: by Bentley, Group Founder, Leader, Chief (new)

Bentley | 32378 comments Mod
That China does.

And a job well done with the citation you added.

We also add the word by after the cover and before the photo if available and author's link as follows:

La Chinafrique Quand la Chine fait main basse sur le continent noir (Documents Français) (French Edition) by Michel Beuret by Michel Beuret (no photo)

But you have done a wonderful job and just as a side note - I am always amazed at folks who converse, read, and write in multiple languages effortlessly. A tremendous accomplishment.


message 85: by Jerome (new)

Jerome | 3594 comments An upcoming book:
Release date: September 2, 2014

The Zulus at War: The History, Rise, and Fall of the Tribe That Washed Its Spears

The Zulus at War The History, Rise, and Fall of the Tribe That Washed Its Spears by Adrian Greaves by Adrian Greaves (no photo)

Synopsis:

By tracing the long and turbulent history of the Zulus from their arrival in South Africa and the establishment of Zululand, The Zulus at War is an important and readable addition to this popular subject area. It describes the violent rise of King Shaka and his colorful successors under whose leadership the warrior nation built a fearsome fighting reputation without equal among the native tribes of South Africa. It also examines the tactics and weapons employed during the numerous intertribal battles over this period. They then became victims of their own success in that their defeat of the Boers in 1877 and 1878 in the Sekunini War prompted the well-documented British intervention.

Initially the might of the British empire was humbled as never before by the shock Zulu victory at Isandlwana but the 1879 war ended with the brutal crushing of the Zulu Nation. But, as Adrian Greaves reveals, this was by no means the end of the story. The little known consequences of the division of Zululand, the Boer War, and the 1906 Zulu Rebellion are analyzed in fascinating detail. An added attraction for readers is that this long-awaited history is written not just by a leading authority but, thanks to the coauthor’s contribution, from the Zulu perspective using much completely fresh material.


message 86: by Jerome (new)

Jerome | 3594 comments The Fate of Africa: A History of Fifty Years of Independence

The Fate of Africa A History of Fifty Years of Independence by Martin Meredith by Martin Meredith (no photo)

Synopsis:

The fortunes of Africa have changed dramatically in the fifty years since the independence era began. As Europe's colonial powers withdrew, dozens of new states were launched amid much jubilation and to the world's applause. African leaders stepped forward with energy and enthusiasm to tackle the problems of development and nation-building, boldly proclaiming their hopes of establishing new societies that might offer inspiration to the world at large. The circumstances seemed auspicious. Independence came in the midst of an economic boom. On the world stage, African states excited the attention of the world's rival power blocs; in the Cold War era, the position that each newly independent state adopted in its relations with the West or the East was viewed as a matter of crucial importance. Africa was considered too valuable a prize to lose.

Today, Africa is spoken of only in pessimistic terms. The sum of its misfortunes - its wars, its despotisms, its corruption, its droughts - is truly daunting. No other area of the world arouses such a sense of foreboding. Few states have managed to escape the downward spiral: Botswana stands out as a unique example of an enduring multi-party democracy; South Africa, after narrowly avoiding revolution, has emerged in the post-apartheid era as a well-managed democratic state. But most African countries are effectively bankrupt, prone to civil strife, subject to dictatorial rule, weighted down by debt, and heavily dependent on Western assistance for survival.

So what went wrong? What happened to this vast continent, so rich in resources, culture and history, to bring it so close to destitution and despair in the space of two generations?" Focusing on the key personalities, events and themes of the independence era, Martin Meredith's narrative history seeks to explore and explain the myriad problems that Africa has faced in the past half-century, and faces still. The Fate of Africa is essential reading for anyone seeking to understand how it came to this — and what, if anything, is to be done.


message 87: by Bentley, Group Founder, Leader, Chief (new)

Bentley | 32378 comments Mod
Thank you Jerome


message 88: by Jerome (new)

Jerome | 3594 comments An upcoming book:
Release date: September 23, 2014

The Fortunes of Africa: A History of the Continent over Fifty Centuries

The Fortunes of Africa A History of the Continent over Fifty Centuries by Martin Meredith by Martin Meredith (no photo)

Synopsis:

Legends of Africa’s wealth—it’s gold, ivory, diamonds and slaves—have endured for millennia, drawing in pillaging explorers and conquerors to its shores from afar. In this magisterial prequel to The Fate of Africa, Martin Meredith lavishly recounts the history of a continent whose richness in natural resources has made it a victim of ruthless plunderers—both foreign and domestic.

Meredith’s Africa radiates mystery from every cliff. The fertile soils now marked by the borders of the Sierra Leone promised diamonds to Western colonizers in the nineteenth century. So did the ivory, used in everything from piano keys to billiard balls and jewelry, which led to the emergence of powerful crime syndicates across the continent and the relentless poaching of the African elephant. The slave trade has likewise been active for hundreds of years, from the ninth century onwards, when slaves from black Africa would be marched across the Sahara desert, shipped over the Red Sea, and sold into market in the Levant, Mesopotamia, the Arabian Peninsula, the Persian Gulf—and finally to North and South America by Portuguese, British, French, Spanish, and Dutch traders.

The Fortunes of Africa is the definitive history of the African continent, beginning with the emergence of the first nation state on the banks of the Nile River and covering everything from the fall of the Thebes to the Scramble for Africa and the extraordinary and ruthless exploits of key personalities like Cecil Rhodes. Martin Meredith, once again, weaves together a fascinating tapestry of the cultures and histories that defined the African continent for over 5,000 years—the millennia preceding the tumultuous independence movements of the 20th century when African countries, one by one, finally started to break free from colonial rule.


message 89: by Jerome (new)

Jerome | 3594 comments Africa Explored: Europeans on the Dark Continent, 1769-1889

Africa Explored Europeans on the Dark Continent, 1769-1889 by Christopher Hibbert by Christopher HibbertChristopher Hibbert

Synopsis:

Many outstanding men James Bruce, Richard Francis Burton, David Livingstone, Henry Morton Stanley, and others won lasting fame from their African journeys. Africa Explored collects their amazing tales of treks into the unknown. These tales of Europeans in Africa before the wave of colonialism mix exotic sights and startling customs with sympathetic meetings of Africa's people and scenes of sublime beauty. Africa Explored relates Mungo Park's being robbed and left for dead in the West African desert, then saved by repeated acts of kindness; Burton and Speke's search for the legendary Mountains of the Moon that fed the Nile; Alexander Laing's fatal voyage to Timbuktu; Livingston's journeys up the Zambezi River; German missionary Johannes Rebmann's astonishment at beholding the snow-capped peak of Kilimanjaro; and other incredible encounters with strange animals, the slave trade, crippling diseases, and desert nomads.


message 90: by Jill, Assisting Moderator - Military Hist L/Global NF/Eur/Brit/Music (last edited Jul 08, 2014 06:15PM) (new)

Jill Hutchinson (Bucs1960) | 12532 comments Mod
One of my favorite historians.

Christopher HibbertChristopher Hibbert


message 91: by Bentley, Group Founder, Leader, Chief (new)

Bentley | 32378 comments Mod
Thank you Jill for assisting Jill.


message 92: by Jerome (last edited Oct 02, 2014 12:51PM) (new)

Jerome | 3594 comments An upcoming book:
Release date: December 18, 2014

Eurafrica: The Untold History of European Integration and Colonialism

Eurafrica The Untold History of European Integration and Colonialism by Peo Hansen by Peo Hansen (no photo)

Synopsis:

In order to think theoretically about our global age it is important to understand how the global has been conceived historically. 'Eurafrica' was an intellectual endeavor and political project that from the 1920s saw Europe's future survival - its continued role in history - as completely bound up with Europe's successful merger with Africa. In its time the concept of Eurafrica was tremendously influential in the process of European integration.

Today the project is largely forgotten, yet the idea continues to influence EU policy towards its African 'partner'. The book will recover a critical conception of the nexus between Europe and Africa - a relationship of significance across the humanities and social sciences. In assessing this historical concept the authors shed light on the process of European integration, African decolonization and the current conflictual relationship between Europe and Africa.


message 93: by Jill, Assisting Moderator - Military Hist L/Global NF/Eur/Brit/Music (new)

Jill Hutchinson (Bucs1960) | 12532 comments Mod
The British just couldn't win in Africa during WWI. The Armistice, based on European action, finally ended the struggle in Africa.

World War I: The African Front

World War I The African Front  by Edward Paice by Edward Paice (no photo)

Synopsis:

The definitive history of World War I's forgotten front: Britain versus Germany in East Africa to secure the belly of a continent.
On August 7, 1914, Britain fired its first shots of World War I not in Europe but in the German colony of Togo. The campaign to eliminate the threat at sea posed by German naval bases in Africa would soon be won, but in the land war, especially in East Africa, British troops would meet far fiercer resistance from German colonial forces that had fully mastered the tactics of bush warfare. It was expected to be a "small war," over by Christmas, yet it would continue bloodily for more than four years, even beyond the signing of the Armistice in Europe.
Its costs were immense, its butchery staggering (in excess of100,000 British troops and 45,000 native recruits dead). Utmost among the tragic consequences, though, was the waste laid to the land and its indigenous peoples in what one official historian described as "a war of extermination and attrition without parallel in modern times." Imperialism had gone calamitously amok.
This eye-opening account of the Great War in East Africa does not flinch at the daily horrors of an ill-fated campaign--not just the combat but also a hostile climate, disease, the terrible loneliness--nor does it fail to recount tales of extraordinary courage and the kind of adventure that inspired fiction. In all, it demonstrates dramatically why even the most hardened of Great War soldiers preferred the trenches of France to the trauma of East Africa.


message 94: by Ken (new)

Ken Moten | 24 comments Homegoing by Yaa Gyasi by Yaa GyasiYaa Gyasi

This book details the trials and tribulations of a Ghanian family from the late 18th century to the early 21st century. The family is unknowingly separated due to the many raids that rival nations-states launch on each other during the Atlantic Slave Trade and we see the struggles of each line of descent on both sides of the Atlantic. I give better detail on the book here: https://www.goodreads.com/review/show... but suffice to say this is one of the boldest works on this topic in contemporary time.


« previous 1 2 next »
back to top

unread topics | mark unread


Books mentioned in this topic

Left to Tell: Discovering God Amidst the Rwandan Holocaust (other topics)
Disgrace (other topics)
The No. 1 Ladies' Detective Agency (other topics)
Blue Shoes and Happiness (other topics)
Tears of the Giraffe (other topics)
More...

Authors mentioned in this topic

Chinua Achebe (other topics)
Alexandra Fuller (other topics)
Alexander McCall Smith (other topics)
Barbara Kingsolver (other topics)
John Reader (other topics)
More...