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BRITISH HISTORY > WELLINGTON AND THE BATTLE OF WATERLOO - 1815




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message 73: by Jill, Assisting Moderator - Military Hist L/Global NF/Eur/Brit/Music (new)

Jill Hutchinson (Bucs1960) | 9292 comments Napoleon missed his chance at Quatre Bras to turn his defeat at Waterloo into a victory and change history.

1815: The Waterloo Campaign: Wellington, His German Allies and the Battles of Ligny and Quatre Bras

1815 The Waterloo Campaign  Wellington, His German Allies and the Battles of Ligny and Quatre Bras by Peter Hofschröer by Peter Hofschröer(no photo)

Synopsis:

The Battles of Quatre Bras and Ligny are often overshadowed by the Battle of Waterloo that took place two days later. Yet the events of 16 June 1815 were crucial, as Napoleon missed his chance of achieving a decisive victory. Peter Hofschroer's authoritative guide to these two critical engagements tells the story of the campaign and investigates each battle in detail, and he takes the reader on a fascinating tour of the present-day battlefields. By skillful use of maps, photographs and diagrams, he describes the movements of the armies and analyses the thinking and actions of the commanders.


message 72: by Jerome (new)

Jerome | 2993 comments An upcoming book:
Release date: August 19, 2015

Wellington's Hidden Heroes: The Dutch and the Belgians at Waterloo

Wellington's Hidden Heroes  The Dutch and the Belgians at Waterloo by Veronica Baker-Smith by Veronica Baker-Smith (no photo)

Synopsis:

The Duke of Wellington described the Battle of Waterloo as “the most desperate business I ever was in . . . I was never so near being beat.” The courage of British troops that day has been rightly praised ever since, but the fact that one-third of the forces which gave him his narrow victory were subjects, not of George III but of the King of the Netherlands has been almost completely ignored. This book seeks to correct a grave injustice through the study of Dutch sources, the majority of which have never been used by English-speaking historians.

The Dutch-Belgians have been variously described as inexperienced, incompetent and cowardly, a rogue element in the otherwise disciplined Allied Army. It is only now being tentatively acknowledged that they alone saved Wellington from disaster at Quatre Bras. He had committed a strategic error in that, as Napoleon advanced, his own troops were scattered over a hundred kilometers of southern Belgium. Outnumbered three to one, the Netherlanders gave him time to concentrate his forces and save Brussels from French occupation. At Waterloo itself, on at least three occasions when the fate of the battle “hung upon the cusp,” their engagement with the enemy aided British recovery. Their commander—the Prince of Orange—has been viciously described as an arrogant fool, “a disaster waiting to happen” and even a dangerous lunatic. According to the assessment of Wellington himself, he was a reliable and courageous subordinate.

This book reveals a new dimension of the famous campaign, and includes many unseen illustrations. For the first time, a full assessment is made of the challenge which Willem I faced as king of a country hastily cobbled together by the Congress of Vienna, and of his achievement in assembling, equipping and training 30,000 men from scratch in 18 months. During this 200th anniversary year of the Battle of Waterloo, the veneration which the Duke of Wellington justifiably enjoyed after the campaign should not be allowed to overshadow his lifelong lack of recognition of the debt he owed the Netherlanders. As he once said himself, “there should be glory enough for all,” and in these pages some of his most vital allies are finally allowed to claim their share.


message 71: by Jill, Assisting Moderator - Military Hist L/Global NF/Eur/Brit/Music (new)

Jill Hutchinson (Bucs1960) | 9292 comments Another well done biography of Wellington.

The Iron Duke

The Iron Duke by Lawrence James by Lawrence James(no photo)

Synopsis:

Lord Wellington don’t know how to lose a battle.” This view of a soldier at Waterloo became the judgment of the world on the man who was hailed as the first general of his age. At Waterloo, Wellington defeated Napoleon, the master of war, finally checking the disruptive forces of the French Revolution that had troubled Europe for over two decades. He taught himself the art of war in India, where his hard-fought victories helped lay the foundations of the British Raj. His armies liberated Portugal and Spain, shattered the myth of French invincibility, and inspired the people of Europe to oppose Napoleon. Largely drawn from original sources, this first-rate biography follows the life of Wellington the soldier, explaining how he waged war, how he inspired the men he commanded, and how he brought peace to Europe.


message 70: by Jill, Assisting Moderator - Military Hist L/Global NF/Eur/Brit/Music (last edited Mar 09, 2015 09:33PM) (new)

Jill Hutchinson (Bucs1960) | 9292 comments One more look at the famous battle by a historian who has written many books on Napoleon and Waterloo.

Waterloo: Napoleon's Last Gamble

Waterloo  Napoleon's Last Gamble by Andrew Roberts by Andrew RobertsAndrew Roberts

Synopsis:

June 18, 1815, was one of the most momentous days in world history, marking the end of twenty-two years of French Revolutionary and Napoleonic Wars. On the bloody battlefield of Waterloo, the Emperor Napoleon and his hastily formed legions clashed with the Anglo-Allied armies led by the Duke of Wellington -- the only time the two greatest military strategists of their age faced each other in combat.

With precision and elegance, Andrew Roberts sets the political, strategic, and historical scene, providing a breathtaking account of each successive stage of the battle while also examining new evidence that reveals exactly how Napoleon was defeated. Illuminating, authoritative, and engrossing, Waterloo is a masterful work of history.


message 69: by Bentley, Group Founder, Leader, Chief (new)

Bentley | 28661 comments Thank you Jerome and Jill for all of the adds on all of the British History threads.


message 68: by Jill, Assisting Moderator - Military Hist L/Global NF/Eur/Brit/Music (new)

Jill Hutchinson (Bucs1960) | 9292 comments Thanks, Jerome.


message 67: by Jerome (new)

Jerome | 2993 comments Waterloo: Four Days that Changed Europe's Destiny

Waterloo  Four Days that Changed Europe's Destiny by Tim Clayton by Tim ClaytonTim Clayton

Synopsis:

An epic page-turner about Waterloo, one of the greatest land battles in British history, rich in dramatic human detail and grounded in first class research.

The bloodbath at Waterloo ended a war that had engulfed the world for over twenty years. It also finished the career of the charismatic Napoleon Bonaparte. It ensured the final liberation of Germany and the restoration of the old European monarchies, and it represented one of very few defeats for the glorious French army, most of whose soldiers remained devoted to their Emperor until the very end.

Extraordinary though it may seem much about the Battle of Waterloo has remained uncertain, with many major features of the campaign hotly debated. Most histories have depended heavily on the evidence of British officers that were gathered about twenty years after the battle. But the recent publication of an abundance of fresh first-hand accounts from soldiers of all the participating armies has illuminated important episodes and enabled radical reappraisal of the course of the campaign. What emerges is a darker, muddier story, no longer biased by notions of regimental honour, but a tapestry of irony, accident, courage, horror and human frailty.

An epic page turner, rich in dramatic human detail and grounded in first-class scholarly research, Waterloo is the real inside story of the greatest land battle in British history, the defining showdown of the age of muskets, bayonets, cavalry and cannon.


message 66: by Jill, Assisting Moderator - Military Hist L/Global NF/Eur/Brit/Music (last edited Jan 31, 2015 11:48AM) (new)

Jill Hutchinson (Bucs1960) | 9292 comments The Iron Duke is known for his heroic military career but he was also a Prime Minister for which he doesn't get as much attention. Below is a short synopsis of his tenure as PM.

Wellington as Prime Minister

After the Battle of Waterloo, he became Commander in Chief of the army in occupied France until November 1818. He then returned to England and Parliament, and joined Lord Liverpool’s government in 1819 as Master General of the Ordnance. He undertook a number of diplomatic visits overseas, including a trip to Russia.

In 1828, after twice being overlooked in favour of Canning and Goderich, the Duke of Wellington was finally invited by King George IV to form his own government and set about forming his Cabinet.

As Prime Minister, he was very conservative; known for his measures to repress reform, his popularity sank a little during his time in office. Yet one of his first achievements was overseeing Catholic emancipation in 1829, the granting of almost full civil rights to Catholics in the United Kingdom.

Feelings ran very high on the issue. The duke persuaded the King only by his threat of resignation. Lord Winchilsea, an opponent of the bill, claimed that by granting freedoms to Catholics Wellington “treacherously plotted the destruction of the Protestant constitution”.

As a result, he and Winchilsea fought a duel in Battersea Park in March 1829. They deliberately missed each other in firing, and honour was satisfied.

The duke had a much less enlightened position on parliamentary reform. He defended rule by the elite and refused to expand the political franchise.

His fear of mob rule was enhanced by the riots and sabotage that followed rising rural unemployment. His opposition to reform caused his popularity to plummet to such an extent that crowds gathered to throw missiles at his London home.

The government was defeated in the Commons, and the duke resigned, to be replaced by Earl Grey.

He continued to fight reform in opposition, though he finally consented to the Great Reform Bill in 1832.

Two years later he refused a second invitation to form a government, and instead joined Sir Peel’s ministry as Foreign Secretary. He later became Leader of the House of Lords, and upon Sir Peel’s resignation in 1846, retired from politics. (Source: https://www.gov.uk/government/history...)


message 65: by Jill, Assisting Moderator - Military Hist L/Global NF/Eur/Brit/Music (last edited Jan 08, 2015 03:16PM) (new)

Jill Hutchinson (Bucs1960) | 9292 comments The Iron Duke



Field Marshall Arthur Wellesley, 1st Duke of Wellington, KG, GCB, GCH, PC, FRS (1 May 1769 – 14 September 1852), was a British soldier and statesman, a native of Ireland from the Anglo-Irish Ascendancy, and one of the leading military and political figures of the 19th century. His importance in national history is such that he is often referred to as "the Duke of Wellington" instead of "the 1st Duke of Wellington" (overshadowing the heirs to his dukedom).

Wellesley was commissioned as an ensign in the British Army in 1787. Serving in Ireland as aide-de-camp to two successive Lords Lieutenant of Ireland he was also elected as a Member of Parliament in the Irish House of Commons. A colonel by 1796, Wellesley saw action in the Netherlands and in India, where he fought in the Fourth Anglo-Mysore War at the Battle of Seringapatam. He was appointed governor of Seringapatam and Mysore in 1799 and as a newly appointed major-general won a decisive victory over the Maratha Confederacy at the Battle of Assaye in 1803.

Wellesley rose to prominence as a general during the Peninsular campaign of the Napoleonic Wars, and was promoted to the rank of field marshal after leading the allied forces to victory against the French at the Battle of Vitoria in 1813. Following Napoleon's exile in 1814, he served as the ambassador to France and was granted a dukedom. During the Hundred Days in 1815, he commanded the allied army which, together with a Prussian army under Blücher, defeated Napoleon at the Battle of Waterloo. Wellesley's battle record is exemplary, ultimately participating in some 60 battles during the course of his military career.

Wellesley is famous for his adaptive defensive style of warfare, resulting in several victories against a numerically superior force while minimising his own losses. He is regarded as one of the greatest defensive commanders of all time, and many of his tactics and battle plans are still studied in military academies around the world. Regarded as one of Britain's most significant military figures, in 2002, he was placed at number 15 in the BBC's poll of the 100 Greatest Britons.

He was twice British prime minister under the Tory party: from 1828–30 and for a little less than a month in 1834. He oversaw the passage of the Catholic Relief Act 1829, but opposed the Reform Act 1832. He continued as one of the leading figures in the House of Lords until his retirement and remained Commander-in-Chief of the British Army until his death.


message 64: by Bentley, Group Founder, Leader, Chief (new)

Bentley | 28661 comments Thank you very much for that Jill.


message 63: by Jill, Assisting Moderator - Military Hist L/Global NF/Eur/Brit/Music (new)

Jill Hutchinson (Bucs1960) | 9292 comments This BBC link explains the Battle of Waterloo and each aspect of that battle. So if you want to know everything about Waterloo, you can find it here.

http://www.bbc.co.uk/history/british/...


message 62: by Jill, Assisting Moderator - Military Hist L/Global NF/Eur/Brit/Music (new)

Jill Hutchinson (Bucs1960) | 9292 comments Thanks for those interesting adds, Jerome.


message 61: by Jerome (new)

Jerome | 2993 comments Another:
Release date: February 10, 2015

The Longest Afternoon: The 400 Men Who Decided the Battle of Waterloo

The Longest Afternoon  The 400 Men Who Decided the Battle of Waterloo by Brendan Simms by Brendan Simms (no photo)

Synopsis:

In 1815, the deposed emperor Napoleon returned to France and threatened the already devastated and exhausted continent with yet another war. Near the small Belgian municipality of Waterloo, two large, hastily mobilized armies faced each other to decide the future of Europe—Napoleon’s forces on one side, and the Duke of Wellington on the other.

With so much at stake, neither commander could have predicted that the battle would be decided by the Second Light Battalion, King’s German Legion, which was given the deceptively simple task of defending the Haye Sainte farmhouse, a crucial crossroads on the way to Brussels. In The Longest Afternoon, Brendan Simms recounts how these 400-odd riflemen beat back wave after wave of French infantry until finally forced to withdraw, but only after holding up Napoleon for so long that he lost the overall contest. Their actions alone decided the most influential battle in European history.

Drawing on previously untapped eye-witness reports for accurate and vivid details of the course of the battle, Simms captures the grand choreography and pervasive chaos of Waterloo: the advances and retreats, the death and the maiming, the heroism and the cowardice. He describes the gallant fighting spirit of the French infantrymen, who clambered over the bodies of their fallen comrades as they assaulted the heavily fortified farmhouse—and whose bravery was only surpassed by that of their opponents in the Second Light Battalion. Motivated by opposition to Napoleonic tyranny, dynastic loyalty to the King of England, German patriotism, regimental camaraderie, personal bonds of friendship, and professional ethos, the battalion suffered terrible casualties and fought tirelessly for many long hours, but refused to capitulate or retreat until the evening, by which time the Prussians had arrived on the battlefield in large numbers.

In reorienting Waterloo around the Haye Sainte farmhouse, Simms gives us a riveting new account of the famous battle—an account that reveals, among other things, that Napoleon came much closer than is commonly thought to winning it. A heroic tale of 400 soldiers who changed the course of history, The Longest Afternoon will become an instant classic of military history.


message 60: by Jerome (new)

Jerome | 2993 comments Another:
Release date: February 1, 2015

Waterloo 1815: The British Army's Day of Destiny

Waterloo 1815  The British Army's Day of Destiny by Gregory Fremont-Barnes by Gregory Fremont-Barnes (no photo)

Synopsis:

The Battle of Waterloo is one of the most important moments in military history. This book seeks to not only tell the story of this great battle, but also to challenge conventional thinking about the opposing forces and the British victory. At noon on June 18, 1815, the might of the Imperial French Army under Napoleon faced the Anglo-Allied Army, commanded by the Duke of Wellington and bolstered by the Prussian Army. It has recently been argued that the British Army alone would never have been able to withstand Napoleon’s troops and that the glory for the victory should be laid at the feet of the Prussians, who swept into battle in the evening. Leading Napoleonic expert Gregory Fremont-Barnes is one of the first authors to challenge this stance, proving that the British Army alone was more than equal to the French, and that victory would ultimately have been theirs with or without the arrival of the Prussians. He uses numerous previously unpublished sources to examine both armies and give one of the most insightful accounts of the battle yet to be published.


message 59: by Jerome (new)

Jerome | 2993 comments An upcoming book:
Release date: December 5, 2014

Waterloo: A New History

Waterloo  A New History by Gordon Corrigan by Gordon Corrigan (no photo)

Synopsis:

Wellington remarked that Waterloo was a damned nice thing, meaning uncertain or finely balanced. He was right. For his part, Napoleon reckoned the English are bad troops and this affair is nothing more that eating breakfast. He was wrong and this gripping and dramatic narrative history shows just how wrong. Fought on Sunday, June 18th, 1815, by some 220,000 men over rain-sodden ground in what is now Belgium, the Battle of Waterloo brought an end to twenty-three years of almost continual war between imperial France and her enemies. A decisive defeat for Napoleon and a hard-won victory for the Allied armies of the Duke of Wellington and the Prussians, led by the stalwart Marshal Blucher, it brought about the French emperor s final exile to St. Helena and cleared the way for Britain to become the dominant military power in the world. The Napoleonic Wars are a source of endless fascination and this authoritative volume provides a wide and colorful window into this all-important climatic battle.


message 58: by Jerome (new)

Jerome | 2993 comments Waterloo: The True Story of Four Days, Three Armies and Three Battles

Waterloo  The True Story of Four Days, Three Armies and Three Battles by Bernard Cornwell by Bernard CornwellBernard Cornwell

Synopsis:

Bestselling author Bernard Cornwell is celebrated for his ability to bring history to life. Here, in his first work of non-fiction, he has written the true story of the epic battle of Waterloo – a momentous turning point in European history – a tale of one campaign, four days and three armies.

He focuses on what it was like to be fighting in that long battle, whether officer or private, whether British, Prussian or French; he makes you feel you are present at the scene. The combination of his vivid, gripping style and detailed historical research make this, his first non-fiction book, the number one book for the upcoming 200th anniversary of the Battle of Waterloo.

It is a magnificent story. There was heroism on both sides, tragedy too and much misery. Bernard Cornwell brings those combatants back to life, using their memories to recreate what it must have been like to fight in one of the most ghastly battles of history. It was given extra piquancy because all of Europe reckoned that the two greatest soldiers of the age were Napoleon and Wellington, yet the two had never faced each other in battle. Both were acutely aware of that, and aware that history would judge them by the result. In the end it was a victory for Wellington, but when he saw the casualty lists he wept openly. ‘I pray to God,’ he said, ‘I have fought my last battle.’ He had, and it is a story for the ages.


message 57: by Bentley, Group Founder, Leader, Chief (new)

Bentley | 28661 comments So many good books and so little time in a day for reading.


message 56: by Jill, Assisting Moderator - Military Hist L/Global NF/Eur/Brit/Music (last edited Mar 19, 2015 10:00AM) (new)

Jill Hutchinson (Bucs1960) | 9292 comments I haven't read this book but it surely looks interesting.

Wellington's Guns: The Untold Story of Wellington and his Artillery in the Peninsula and at Waterloo

Wellington's Guns  The Untold Story of Wellington and his Artillery in the Peninsula and at Waterloo by Nick Lipscombe by Nick Lipscombe (no photo)

Synopsis:

The history books have forgotten the artillery of Wellington's army during the Napoleonic Wars, but in this book Nick Lipscombe offers a study of the gunners through first-hand accounts, bringing life and color to their heroic actions.

Wellington was, without doubt, a brilliant field commander, but his leadership style was abrupt and occasionally uncompromising, especially to his artillery. He trained his infantry generals as divisional commanders but not army commanders; for his cavalry commanders he had little time often pouring scorn on their inability to control their units and formation in battle; but it was his artillery commanders that he kept at arm's length in particular, suspicious of their different chain of higher command and of their selection through ability, rather than privilege. In consequence, Wellington's relationship with his gunners was dutiful at best, and occasionally failed completely. Frequently frustrated by his lack of control and influence over the artillery off the battlefield, Wellington would occasionally over-exert his authority on it, personally deploying the guns sometimes against the advice of his experts. Wellington's personal distrust culminated in a letter to The Master General of the Ordnance in December 1815 in which he commented, 'to tell you the truth, I was not very pleased with the Artillery in the battle of Waterloo'. This resulted in the mistaken belief that the gunners performed badly at this crucial battle, supposedly abandoning their guns and fleeing the field, in direct contrast to French eyewitness accounts.

Wellington's Guns is the long overdue story of this often stormy relationship, the frustrations, challenges, the characters, and the achievements of the main protagonists as well as a detailed account of the British artillery of this period. Even with the valiant contribution of some 12,000 gunner officers, NCOs and rank and file, five battery honour titles, and numerous primary accounts, this is a story which has never been told. This despite the fact that the artillery itself was revolutionized during the course of the Napoleonic Wars from developing the vital 'danger-close' missions in the woods of Hougoumont, Belgium to the mountain gun attacks during the Pyrenean campaign of the Peninsular War and creeping barrages and Congreve rockets in all theatres, with the ultimate result that the artillery itself became a crucial component of any future and indeed modern army.


message 55: by Jill, Assisting Moderator - Military Hist L/Global NF/Eur/Brit/Music (new)

Jill Hutchinson (Bucs1960) | 9292 comments A biography of Napoleon's great commander at the Battle of Waterloo.

Marshal Ney: The Bravest of the Brave

Marshal Ney  The Bravest of the Brave by Andrew Hilliard Atteridge by Andrew Hilliard Atteridge (no photo)

Synopsis

A. H. Atteridge's biography of Michel Ney. Napoleon's most famous marshal, is a classic work of its kind. He describes Ney's meteoric career in vivid detail, from his enlistment as a hussar in the army of Louis XVI, his rapid promotion through the ranks of the revolutionary armies and his long service under Napoleon. Ney's pugnacious character and his capacity for inspiring leadership come across strongly in innumerable actions across 25 years of almost constant warfare. Particularly striking are the author's accounts of Ney's contribution to Napoleon's most famous campaigns - Ulm and Austerlitz, Jena, Eylau and Friedland and the catastrophic march on Moscow. Ney's last battle. Waterloo, and his subsequent execution by the returning Bourbons form the last chapter of this fascinating story.


message 54: by Jill, Assisting Moderator - Military Hist L/Global NF/Eur/Brit/Music (last edited Jul 04, 2014 07:41PM) (new)

Jill Hutchinson (Bucs1960) | 9292 comments This is one of those "must read" books about the famous battle written by a noted historian.

Waterloo: A Near Run Thing

Waterloo  A Near Run Thing by David Howarth by David Howarth(no photo)

Synopsis:

The first shots were fired at about eleven-thirty on a Sunday morning in June, 1815; by nine o'clock that night, forty thousand men lay dead or wounded, and Napoleon had abandoned not only his army, but all hope of recovering his empire. From the recollections of the men who were there, esteemed author David Howarth has recreated the battle as it appeared to them on the day it was fought. He follows the fortunes of men of all ranks and on both sides. But it is on the French side that the mysteries remain. Why did Ney attack with cavalry alone? And was Napoleon's downfall really due to the minor ailment he suffered that day? Beautifully written, vivid, and unforgettable, this illuminating history is impossible to put down.


message 53: by Jerome (new)

Jerome | 2993 comments That looks quite interesting, thanks, Jill.


message 52: by Jill, Assisting Moderator - Military Hist L/Global NF/Eur/Brit/Music (last edited May 13, 2014 05:44PM) (new)

Jill Hutchinson (Bucs1960) | 9292 comments Did you know about the Duke of Wellington's brothers and how they helped shape the British Empire? If not, try this well done biography of the family.

Architects of Empire: The Duke of Wellington and His Brothers

Architects of Empire  The Duke of Wellington and His Brothers by John Severn by John Severn (no photo)

Synopsis:

A soldier and statesman for the ages, the Duke of Wellington is a towering figure in world history. John Severn now offers a fresh look at the man born Arthur Wellesley to show that his career was very much a family affair, a lifelong series of interactions with his brothers and their common Anglo-Irish heritage. The untold story of a great family drama, Architects of Empire paints a new picture of the era through the collective biography of Wellesley and his siblings.

Severn takes readers from the British Raj in India to the battlefields of the Napoleonic Wars to the halls of Parliament as he traces the rise of the five brothers from obscurity to prominence. Severn covers both the imperial Indian period before 1800 and the domestic political period after 1820, describing the wide range of experiences Arthur and his brothers lived through.

Architects of Empire brings together in a single volume a grand story that before now was discernible only through political or military analysis. Weaving the personal history of the brothers into a captivating narrative, it tells of sibling rivalry among men who were by turns generous and supportive, then insensitive and cruel.

Whereas other historians have minimized the importance of family ties, Severn provides an unusually nuanced understanding of the Duke of Wellington. Architects of Empire casts his career in a new light—one that will surprise those who believe they already know the man


message 51: by Jill, Assisting Moderator - Military Hist L/Global NF/Eur/Brit/Music (new)

Jill Hutchinson (Bucs1960) | 9292 comments You are more than welcome.


message 50: by Bentley, Group Founder, Leader, Chief (new)

Bentley | 28661 comments Thank you Jill for all of your adds.


message 49: by Jill, Assisting Moderator - Military Hist L/Global NF/Eur/Brit/Music (new)

Jill Hutchinson (Bucs1960) | 9292 comments The "go to" book for an in depth overview of the Battle of Waterloo, complete with art work.

The Waterloo Companion: The Complete Guide to History's Most Famous Land Battle

Waterloo Companion, The  The Complete Guide to History's Most Famous Land Battle by Mark Adkin by Mark Adkin(no photo)

Synopsis:

There have been many books about Waterloo, but never one to rival this in scale or authority. The text, based upon extensive research, describes both the battle and the campaign that preceded it in detail, drawing upon the first-hand accounts of participants on all sides in order to give the reader a vivid feeling for the experiences of those who fought upon this most celebrated of all battlefields. The many full-color maps, all specially commissioned for the book, and the numerous diagrams and photographs, the majority in color, as well as sixteen pages of original paintings, make the book a feast for the eyes and a collector's dream.


message 48: by Jill, Assisting Moderator - Military Hist L/Global NF/Eur/Brit/Music (new)

Jill Hutchinson (Bucs1960) | 9292 comments Here is an interesting look at Napoleon's defeat from the standpoint of the French.

A French view of the reasons for Napoleon's defeat

General Antoine-Henri, Baron of Jomini one of the leading military writers on the Napoleonic art of war, had a number of very cogent explanations of the reasons behind Napoleon's defeat at Waterloo.

"In my opinion, four principal causes led to this disaster:

The first, and most influential, was the arrival, skilfully combined, of Blücher, and the false movement that favoured this arrival; the second, was the admirable firmness of the British infantry, joined to the sang-froid and aplomb of its chiefs; the third, was the horrible weather, that had softened the ground, and rendered the offensive movements so toilsome, and retarded till one o'clock the attack that should have been made in the morning; the fourth, was the inconceivable formation of the first corps, in masses very much too deep for the first grand attack." (Source: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Battle_o...)


message 47: by Jill, Assisting Moderator - Military Hist L/Global NF/Eur/Brit/Music (new)

Jill Hutchinson (Bucs1960) | 9292 comments Thanks for those additions, Jerome. They look interesting.


message 46: by Jerome (new)

Jerome | 2993 comments The Battle: A New History of Waterloo

The Battle  A New History of Waterloo by Alessandro Barbero by Alessandro BarberoAlessandro Barbero

Synopsis:

At Waterloo, some 70,000 men under Napoleon and an equal number under Wellington faced one another in a titanic and bloody struggle. In the end, as John Keegan notes, contemporaries felt that Napoleon's defeat had "reversed the tide of European history." Even 190 years later, the name Waterloo resounds.

Italian historian Alessandro Barbero's majestic new account stands apart from previous British and French histories by giving voice to all the nationalities that took part. Invoking the memories of British, French, and Prussian soldiers, Barbero meticulously re-creates the conflict as it unfolded, from General Reille's early afternoon assault on the chateau of Hougoumont, to the desperate last charge of Napoleon's Imperial Guard as evening settled in. From privates to generals, Barbero recounts individual miracles and tragedies, moments of courage and foolhardiness, skillfully blending them into the larger narrative of the battle's extraordinary ebb and flow. One is left with indelible images: cavalry charges against soldiers formed in squares; the hand-to-hand combat around farmhouses; endless cannon balls and smoke. And, finally, a powerful appreciation of the inevitability and futility of war.


message 45: by Jerome (new)

Jerome | 2993 comments 1815: The Waterloo Campaign, the German Victory: From Waterloo to the Fall of Napoleon

1815  The Waterloo Campaign, the German Victory  From Waterloo to the Fall of Napoleon by Peter Hofschroer by Peter Hofschroer (no photo)

Synopsis:

In this masterly study of 1815, Peter Hofschroer challenges the accepted version of events at the battle of Waterloo. He demonstrates convincingly that Allied victory hinged on the contribution of German soldiers. Drawing on previously unpublished accounts, Hofschroer gives not only the Prussian perspective of their march to Waterloo and decisive attack on Napoleon's flank, but also details of the actions fought by some of the 25,000 Germans in Wellington's µBritish' army v more than a third of the Duke's force. A gripping narrative of astonishing detail captures such key episodes of Waterloo as La Haye Sainte, Papelotte, Hougoumont and the Prussian struggle with the Imperial Guard for Plancenoit. In addition, Hofschrer examines the battle at Wavre, the Allied offensive into France, the taking of Paris and the sieges across northern France.


message 44: by Jerome (new)

Jerome | 2993 comments Waterloo: June 18, 1815: The Battle For Modern Europe

Waterloo  June 18, 1815  The Battle For Modern Europe by Andrew Roberts by Andrew Roberts (no photo)

Synopsis:

June 18, 1815, was one of the most momentous days in world history, marking the end of twenty-two years of French Revolutionary and Napoleonic Wars. On the bloody battlefield of Waterloo, the Emperor Napoleon and his hastily formed legions clashed with the Anglo-Allied armies led by the Duke of Wellington -- the only time the two greatest military strategists of their age faced each other in combat.

With precision and elegance, Andrew Roberts sets the political, strategic, and historical scene, providing a breathtaking account of each successive stage of the battle while also examining new evidence that reveals exactly how Napoleon was defeated. Illuminating, authoritative, and engrossing, Waterloo is a masterful work of history.


message 43: by Jill, Assisting Moderator - Military Hist L/Global NF/Eur/Brit/Music (new)

Jill Hutchinson (Bucs1960) | 9292 comments A closer look at Elba and Napoleon's escape to meet his fate at the Battle of Waterloo.

The Escape from Elba: The Fall and Flight of Napoleon 1814-1815

The Escape from Elba  The Fall & Flight of Napoleon 1814-15 by Norman Ian MacKenzie by Norman Ian MacKenzie (no photo)

Synopsis

The year is 1814. The Allies have driven Napoleon's once-mighty armies back to Paris. Trapped, forced to abdicate after two decades of triumphant rule, the Emperor takes leave of his comrades-in-arms and sets sail for his new domain - the tiny, poverty-stricken, pestilential island of Elba. Yet within ten months Napoleon will enter Paris once again, at the heels of the fleeing Bourbon king, flushed with victory and cheered by the masses. The Escape From Elba tells the heroic story of Napoleon's exile and phoenix-like return. In this classic account, now republished in paperback, Norman MacKenzie chronicles this extraordinary year: the tense last hours of Napoleon's empire, his humiliating exile, his midnight escape and his whirlwind march over snowbound mountains to Grenoble where, in a dramatic confrontation with the French army, he became a reigning prince again. Described in vivid detail are Napoleon's adventures as the head of Elba. He brought society, splendor, organization and political intrigue to this run-down backwater. And he displayed on this small stage the many sides of his charismatic personality


message 42: by Jill, Assisting Moderator - Military Hist L/Global NF/Eur/Brit/Music (last edited Sep 03, 2013 09:56AM) (new)

Jill Hutchinson (Bucs1960) | 9292 comments A very in-depth look at the battle tactics and strategies that made the Battle of Waterloo so important to the history of Europe.

Waterloo: The Hundred Days

Waterloo  The Hundred Days by David G. Chandler by David G. ChandlerDavid G. Chandler

Synopsis:

The Battle of Waterloo is one of the most decisive encounters in history. Wellington's victory marked the end of the career of one of the greatest leaders of all time, Napoleon Bonaparte: it also signalled a crucial change in the balance of power in Europe that was to have critical consequences for the rest of the world. Yet the story of Napoleon's return from Elba and his dramatic seizure of power - even if for a mere 'hundred days' - is more than just the dry bones of history; it is a great adventure story. The author provides a blow-by-blow account of the battle itself and examines key aspects such as the organisation of both the French and the Allied armies, their tactics, strategy and weaponry, and their commanders' personalities.


message 41: by Jill, Assisting Moderator - Military Hist L/Global NF/Eur/Brit/Music (new)

Jill Hutchinson (Bucs1960) | 9292 comments This author has written other books on Waterloo and he doesn't disappoint with this one which is slightly revisionist in comparison to some of the other histories of the battle.

Napoleon and Wellington: The Long Duel

Napoleon and Wellington  The Long Duel by Andrew Roberts by Andrew Roberts (no photo)

Synopsis:

An award-winning historian offers an eye-opening view of the relationship between Napoleon Bonaparte and the Duke of Wellington, whose lives moved inexorably to their meeting at Waterloo, one of the most famous battles of all time."
At breakfast on the morning of the battle of Waterloo, the Emperor Napoleon declared that the Duke of Wellington was a bad general, the British were bad soldiers and that France could not fail to win an easy victory. Forever afterwards, historians have accused him of gross overconfidence and massively underestimating the caliber of the British commander opposite him. Now Andrew Roberts presents an original, highly revisionist view of the relationship between the two greatest captains of their age and of the great battle that determined European history in the nineteenth century.

Napoleon, who was born in the same year as Wellington -- 1769 -- fought Wellington by proxy years earlier in the Peninsular War, praising his ruthlessness in private while publicly deriding him as a mere "general of sepoys." In contrast, Wellington publicly lauded Napoleon, saying that his presence on a battlefield was worth forty thousand men, but privately he wrote long memoranda lambasting Napoleon's campaigning techniques.

Although Wellington saved Napoleon from execution after Waterloo, the emperor left money in his will to the man who had tried to assassinate the duke. Wellington in turn amassed a series of Napoleonic trophies of his great victory, even sleeping with two of the emperor's mistresses.

The fascinating, constantly changing relationship between these two historical giants forms the basis of Andrew Roberts's compelling study in pride, rivalry, propaganda, nostalgia and posthumous revenge. It is at once a brilliant work of military history and a triumphant biography.

Featuring a cast of fascinating supporting characters -- including the empress Josephine, the Prince Regent and Talleyrand -- "Napoleon and Wellington" provides the definitive account of the most decisive battle of the nineteenth century.


message 40: by Jill, Assisting Moderator - Military Hist L/Global NF/Eur/Brit/Music (new)

Jill Hutchinson (Bucs1960) | 9292 comments Where exactly is Waterloo?.......we all know the famous battle but geographic position may be not as familiar. Here is a quick reference.

Waterloo (French pronunciation: ​[watɛʁˈlo][2]) (Walloon: Waterlô) is a Walloon municipality located in the province of Walloon Brabant, Belgium. On 30 September 2011, Waterloo had a total population of 29,706. The total area is 21.03 km² which gives a population density of 1,413 inhabitants per km². Nearly one fifth of the current registered population (5,640 inhabitants) are non-Belgian, many of whom work for institutions or companies in Brussels, a political centre of the European Union. These numbers were released by the municipality of Waterloo. The top five of non Belgians is as follows : French (1,237 people), Italians (537), British (503), Americans (445) and Swedish (425). (Source: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Waterloo...)




message 39: by Bryan, Assisting Moderator - Presidential Series (new)

Bryan Craig | 11547 comments On Wellington: A Critique of Waterloo

On Wellington  A Critique of Waterloo by Carl von Clausewitz Carl von ClausewitzCarl von Clausewitz

Synopsis

The Battle of Waterloo has been studied and dissected so extensively that one might assume little more on the subject could be discovered. Now historian Peter Hofschröer brings forward a long-repressed commentary written by Carl von Clausewitz, the author of On War.
Clausewitz, the Western world's most renowned military theorist, participated in the Waterloo campaign as a senior staff officer in the Prussian army. His appraisal, offered here in an up-to-date and readable translation, criticized the Duke of Wellington's actions. Lord Liverpool sent his translation of the manuscript to Wellington, who pronounced it a "lying work." The translated commentary was quickly buried in Wellington's private papers, where it languished for a century and a half. Now published for the first time in English, Hofschröer brings Clausewitz's critique back into view with thorough annotation and contextual explanation.

Peter Hofschröer, long recognized as a leading scholar of the Napoleonic Wars, shows how the Duke prevented the account's publication during his lifetime--a manipulation of history so successful that almost two centuries passed before Clausewitz's work reemerged, finally permitting a reappraisal of key events in the campaign. In addition to translating and annotating Clausewitz's critique, Hofschröer also includes an order of battle and an extensive bibliography.


message 38: by 'Aussie Rick' (new)

'Aussie Rick' (AussieRick) Thanks for mentioning; Waterloo: The French Perspective Jonathan, I have a copy but am yet to read it, soon I hope!

Waterloo  The French Perspective  by Andrew Field by Andrew Field


message 37: by Jill, Assisting Moderator - Military Hist L/Global NF/Eur/Brit/Music (last edited Jan 27, 2013 03:28PM) (new)

Jill Hutchinson (Bucs1960) | 9292 comments Thanks, Jonathan. Eeek is right!!!

The taking of the eagle....painted by Berkeley




message 36: by Jonathan (last edited Jan 27, 2013 02:40PM) (new)

Jonathan Hopkins | 26 comments I'm told that thanks to the large amount of recently unearthed and re-discovered source material, there will be a lot of new information and re-appraisals of Waterloo coming out in time for the bicentennial in 2015.

For example, the Scots Grey's eagle may not actually have been taken by Sergeant Ewart. Eeek!

Aficionados could try this one for starters Waterloo  The French Perspective  by Andrew FieldAndrew Field


message 35: by Jill, Assisting Moderator - Military Hist L/Global NF/Eur/Brit/Music (new)

Jill Hutchinson (Bucs1960) | 9292 comments The plan map for the Battle of Waterloo.




message 34: by Jill, Assisting Moderator - Military Hist L/Global NF/Eur/Brit/Music (last edited Oct 08, 2012 07:27PM) (new)

Jill Hutchinson (Bucs1960) | 9292 comments Since we couldn't be there, sometimes a filmed recreation will have to do. This clip is of the French Cavalry attack from the 1970 Soviet/Italian production of "Waterloo".

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=97dBfd...


message 33: by Jill, Assisting Moderator - Military Hist L/Global NF/Eur/Brit/Music (new)

Jill Hutchinson (Bucs1960) | 9292 comments The Duke of Wellington found his place in military history as a result of the Battle of Waterloo. But another player on that stage also covered himself with glory, the Prussian Generalfeldmarschall Count Gebhard von Blucher. This is a short summary of his role at the battle.

Generalfeldsmarschall Count Gebhard von Blucher






The return of Napoleon from Elba brought von Blucher out of retirement in Silesia and he was put in command of the Army of the Lower Rhine, with General August von Gneisenau as his chief of staff. In the campaign of 1815, the Prussians sustained a serious defeat at the outset at Ligny (June 16), in the course of which the old field marshal was repeatedly ridden over by cavalry and lay trapped under his dead horse for several hours, his life saved only by the devotion of his aide-de-camp, Count Nostitz. He was unable to resume command for some hours, and Gneisenau drew off the defeated army and rallied it. After bathing his wounds in brandy, and fortified by liberal internal application of the same, Blücher rejoined his army. Gneisenau feared that the British had reneged on their earlier agreements and favored a withdrawal, but Blücher convinced him to send two Corps to join Wellington at Waterloo. He then led his army on a tortuous march along muddy paths, arriving on the field of Waterloo in the late afternoon. With the battle hanging in the balance Blücher's army intervened with decisive and crushing effect, his vanguard drawing off Napoleon's badly needed reserves, and his main body being instrumental in crushing French resistance. This victory led the way to a decisive victory through the relentless pursuit of the French by the Prussians. The allies re-entered Paris on July 7.

Prince Blücher remained in the French capital for a few months, but his age and infirmities compelled him to retire to his Silesian residence at Krieblowitz, where he died on September 12, 1819, aged 76. After his death, an imposing mausoleum was built for his remains. Blücher retained to the end of his life the wildness and tendency to excesses which had caused his dismissal from the army in his youth, but these faults sprang from an ardent and vivid temperament which made him a leader of people. While by no means a military genius, his sheer determination and ability to spring back from errors made him a competent leader.


message 32: by Jill, Assisting Moderator - Military Hist L/Global NF/Eur/Brit/Music (new)

Jill Hutchinson (Bucs1960) | 9292 comments Terrific picture, AR. I love some of the art work that sprang from the battle of Waterloo.


message 30: by 'Aussie Rick' (last edited Jul 21, 2012 03:39PM) (new)

'Aussie Rick' (AussieRick) My favourite is this depiction of the Battle of Waterloo, I have a framed copy in my hallway and love it:

description


message 29: by Jill, Assisting Moderator - Military Hist L/Global NF/Eur/Brit/Music (new)

Jill Hutchinson (Bucs1960) | 9292 comments The iconic picture by Lady Butler, entitled Scotland Forever. It depicts the charge of the Royal Scots Greys at Waterloo.




message 28: by Jill, Assisting Moderator - Military Hist L/Global NF/Eur/Brit/Music (new)

Jill Hutchinson (Bucs1960) | 9292 comments Although this book concentrates more on Napoleon's 100 days after his escape from Elba, it also provides much information about Wellington and the Battle of Waterloo.

Waterloo: The Hundred Days

Waterloo  The Hundred Days by David Chandler by David Chandler

Synopsis

The Battle of Waterloo is one of the most decisive encounters in history. Wellington's victory marked the end of the career of one of the greatest leaders of all time, Napoleon Bonaparte: it also signalled a crucial change in the balance of power in Europe that was to have critical consequences for the rest of the world. Yet the story of Napoleon's return from Elba and his dramatic seizure of power - even if for a mere 'hundred days' - is more than just the dry bones of history; it is a great adventure story. The author provides a blow-by-blow account of the battle itself and examines key aspects such as the organisation of both the French and the Allied armies, their tactics, strategy and weaponry, and their commanders' personalities.


message 27: by Jill, Assisting Moderator - Military Hist L/Global NF/Eur/Brit/Music (new)

Jill Hutchinson (Bucs1960) | 9292 comments Dancing Into Battle

Dancing into Battle  A Social History of the Battle of Waterloo by Nick Foulkes by Nick Foulkes

Synopsis

Examining a battle that has become one of the most famous in history, this definitive volume chronicles Napoleon's defeat by British, Dutch, Belgian, and German forces on June 18, 1815, in Waterloo, Belgium. Battles were then localized affairs: Waterloo was fought on a piece of land approximately the size of Central Park. For a good many of the men who fought there, in fact, war was something of a sport—a feeling reinforced by the image of the Duke of Richmond cheering on his sons in battle. There are few sporting events, however, that end with 56,000 dead, dying, and wounded men and at least 10,000 horses in a similar state. Nick Foulkes' brilliantly realized portrait of the eve of battle brings a fresh perspective to this turning point in European history


message 26: by 'Aussie Rick' (last edited Dec 01, 2010 09:45PM) (new)

'Aussie Rick' (AussieRick) Here are two books from the British perspective of the Battle of Waterloo and Wellington:


DESPERATE BUSINESS  Wellington The British Army and The Waterloo Campaign by Ian Fletcher by Ian Fletcher (with some great colour prints)
Publishers blurb:
Not just another story of the Waterloo Campaign of 1815, 'A Desperate Business' concentrates solely on the British Army, beginning with the mustering of the army following Napoleon's escape from Elba, through to the build up to the campaign, to the battles of Quatre Bras and Waterloo, and continues through to the advance to and occupation of Paris.

Waterloo Men  The Experience of Battle 16-18 June 1815 by Philip J. Haythornthwaite by Philip J. Haythornthwaite
Publishers blurb:
Waterloo has a claim to be the most discussed battle of all time. It was the battle which finished the career of one of history's handful of indisputable military geniuses; it brought to a close a 20-year-old war; and it altered the destinies of the great powers for nearly 100 years. In 1815 the outcome of battles could still turn on the personalities and behaviour of individual men and this account is told through the words of Wellington's redcoats. With a colour plate section and over 100 paintings, prints and maps, this work studies the Battle of Waterloo and the men who fought in it.


message 25: by 'Aussie Rick' (new)

'Aussie Rick' (AussieRick) I've finally managed to obtain a copy of Sir John Fortescue's account of the Waterloo Campaign.

Campaign of Waterloo (Napoleonic Library) by John W. Fortescue (no cover) Campaign of Waterloo by John W. Fortescue


message 24: by 'Aussie Rick' (new)

'Aussie Rick' (AussieRick) Hi Elizabeth, I didn't know I could do that! Well that opens all sorts of possibilities in regards to some classic books I have :)


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Books mentioned in this topic

Wellington's Smallest Victory: The Duke, the Model Maker, and the Secret of Waterloo (other topics)
Wellington: The Iron Duke (other topics)
On Wellington: The Duke And His Art Of War (other topics)
Wellington: A Military Life (other topics)
Waterloo: New Perspectives: The Great Battle Reappraised (other topics)
More...

Authors mentioned in this topic

Peter Hofschröer (other topics)
Jac Weller (other topics)
Richard Holmes (other topics)
Gordon Corrigan (other topics)
David Howarth (other topics)
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