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BRITISH HISTORY > VICTORIAN AGE/ERA

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message 1: by Bentley, Group Founder, Leader, Chief (last edited Nov 12, 2009 01:04PM) (new)

Bentley | 27576 comments This is a thread which deals with the Victorian Age and all things related to Queen Victoria who had the longest reign in British history.

"The Victorian era of the United Kingdom was the period of Queen Victoria's reign from June 1837 until her death on the 22nd of January 1901. [1:] The reign was a long period of prosperity for the British people, as profits gained from the overseas British Empire, as well as from industrial improvements at home, allowed an educated middle class to develop. Some scholars extend the beginning of the period—as defined by a variety of sensibilities and political games that have come to be associated with the Victorians—back five years to the passage of the Reform Act 1832.

The era was preceded by the Georgian period and succeeded by the Edwardian period. The latter half of the Victorian era roughly coincided with the first portion of the Belle Époque era of continental Europe and the Gilded Age of the United States.

The era is often characterized as a long period of peace, known as the Pax Britannica, and economic, colonial, and industrial consolidation, temporarily disrupted by the Crimean War, although Britain was at war every year during this time. Towards the end of the century, the policies of New Imperialism led to increasing colonial conflicts and eventually the Anglo-Zanzibar War and the Boer War. Domestically, the agenda was increasingly liberal with a number of shifts in the direction of gradual political reform and the widening of the voting franchise.

The population of England had almost doubled from 16.8 million in 1851 to 30.5 million in 1901.[2:] Ireland’s population decreased rapidly, from 8.2 million in 1841 to less than 4.5 million in 1901.[3:] At the same time around 15 million emigrants left the United Kingdom in the Victorian era and settled mostly in the United States, Canada and Australia.[4:]

During the early part of the era, the House of Commons was headed by the two parties, the Whigs and the Tories. From the late 1850s onwards, the Whigs became the Liberals; the Tories became the Conservatives. These parties were led by many prominent statesmen including Lord Melbourne, Sir Robert Peel, Lord Derby, Lord Palmerston, William Gladstone, Benjamin Disraeli and Lord Salisbury. The unsolved problems relating to Irish Home Rule played a great part in politics in the later Victorian era, particularly in view of Gladstone's determination to achieve a political settlement. Indeed these issues would eventually lead to the Easter Rising of 1916 and the subsequent domino effect that would play a large part in the fall of the empire.

The reign of Victoria was the longest in British history, and is foreseeably likely to be exceeded only if the present monarch (Queen Elizabeth II) remains on the throne to 2017.


Source - Wikipedia

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Victoria...



message 2: by Bentley, Group Founder, Leader, Chief (last edited Nov 12, 2009 02:05PM) (new)


message 3: by Bentley, Group Founder, Leader, Chief (new)

Bentley | 27576 comments WELCOME TO 1876 VICTORIAN ENGLAND:

http://logicmgmt.com/1876/intro.htm


message 4: by Bentley, Group Founder, Leader, Chief (new)

Bentley | 27576 comments WELCOME TO MOSTLY VICTORIAN.COM

http://www.mostly-victorian.com/


message 5: by Bentley, Group Founder, Leader, Chief (new)

Bentley | 27576 comments EXPLORING VICTORIAN LONDON:

http://www.victorianlondon.org/


message 6: by Bentley, Group Founder, Leader, Chief (new)

Bentley | 27576 comments THE VICTORIAN WEB:

http://www.victorianweb.org/


message 7: by Bentley, Group Founder, Leader, Chief (new)

Bentley | 27576 comments WELCOME TO THE TWILIGHT CITY:

http://www.historicaleye.com/Lost1.html


message 8: by Bentley, Group Founder, Leader, Chief (new)


message 9: by Bentley, Group Founder, Leader, Chief (new)

Bentley | 27576 comments VICTORIAN WOMENS WRITING PROJECT


http://www.indiana.edu/%7Eletrs/vwwp/


message 10: by Bentley, Group Founder, Leader, Chief (last edited Nov 12, 2009 02:25PM) (new)

Bentley | 27576 comments BBC HISTORY IN DEPTH: VICTORIANS

http://www.bbc.co.uk/history/british/...


message 11: by 'Aussie Rick' (new)

'Aussie Rick' (AussieRick) OK, here's a few to start things off:


Her Little Majesty  The Life of Queen Victoria by Carolly Erickson by Carolly Erickson
A good summary of her early life.

Queen Victoria  A Personal History by Christopher Hibbert by Christopher Hibbert
A very good biography of this great Queen.

Queen Victoria's Little Wars by Byron Farwell by Byron Farwell
A very good book, first published in the 1970's by an American author.

Victoria's Wars  The Rise of Empire by Saul David by Saul David
An excellent and very recent history of Queen Victoria's wars.




message 12: by Bentley, Group Founder, Leader, Chief (new)

Bentley | 27576 comments Thank you for starting to add to this new interest area.


message 14: by Bentley, Group Founder, Leader, Chief (new)

Bentley | 27576 comments Thank you Susanna.


message 15: by [deleted user] (new)

Portrait of an Age G.M. Young was a Fellow of All Souls College, Oxford. There's a good short review of this on Amazon; it remains a classic, perhaps the classic, distillation of the zeitgeist of the period


message 16: by [deleted user] (new)

The Making of Victorian England unless it is this one


message 17: by Bentley, Group Founder, Leader, Chief (new)

Bentley | 27576 comments Sitatunga wrote: "Portrait of an Age G.M. Young was a Fellow of All Souls College, Oxford. There's a good short review of this on Amazon; it remains a classic, perhaps the classic, distillation of the..."

Don't forget to add the authors links and book covers. See message 13.

G. M. Young

The Making of Victorian EnglandG. Kitson Clark


message 18: by Niki (new)

Niki | 37 comments I have not read it but I hear that We Two is good.

We Two  Victoria and Albert  Rulers, Partners, Rivals by Gillian GillGillian Gill


message 19: by 'Aussie Rick' (last edited Jun 03, 2010 09:28PM) (new)

'Aussie Rick' (AussieRick) One area of importance during Queen Victoria's reign was the Crimean War. Here are a few very good books covering this conflict that may interest other readers:

Crimea  The Great Crimean War, 1854-1856 by Trevor Royle by Trevor Royle
Publishers blurb:
The Crimean War is one of the most compelling subjects in British history. Everyone knows about the Charge of the Light Brigade and men like Raglan and Cardigan, have become household names. The story of Florence Nightingale, 'the Lady with the Lamp', and the heroic reporting of William Russell, THE TIMES' intrepid correspondent, and the sonorous names of the battles, are ingrained deep within the British military consciousness - Sebastopol, Inkerman, Balaclava and the Alma. Trevor Royle demonstrates how the Crimean War was a watershed in world history: coming between the defeat of Napoleon in 1815 and the opening shots of the First World War in 1914 it pointed the way to what mass warfare would be like for soldiers in the twentieth century.

THIN RED LINE  The Eyewitness History of the Crimean War by Julian Spilsbury by Julian Spilsbury
Publishers blurb:
The Crimean War was the first 'modern' war for the British forces: journalists reported home via the telegraph, a device that also tempted the government to micro-manage the war from the comfort of Whitehall. It is most famous for the charge of the Light Brigade, celebrated in poetry and film as a classic British military disaster. It also gave us 'The Thin Red Line', when a handful of British infantry saw off a horde of Russian cavalry. It was the first war in which ordinary British soldiers recorded their experiences - and Julian Spilsbury brings their story to life, together with the very different world of their officers and assorted mistresses. The army in the Crimea was a microcosm of Victorian society with all its strengths and weaknesses.

CRIMEAN WAR  A Clash of Empires by Ian Fletcher by Ian Fletcher
Publishers blurb:
2004 marks the 150th anniversary of the Crimean War and this book covers the events from the complex causes of the war and the declaration of war by Turkey in 1853, through the involvement of Britain and France in 1854 and the war itself including the bloody battles of Alma, Balaclava and Inkermann to the declaration of peace in 1856. Unlike the vast majority of books on the war this story is told from both the Russian and British sides, giving a new and balances perspective on this famous and ill-fated conflict. It is the first ever Anglo-Russian book to be written on the Crimean War. The book contains rare photographs not seen before from Russian archives in Moscow and Simferopol. It has detailed accounts of the major battles such as Alma, Inkermann Balaclava and Tchernaya. The book also features modern battlefields photographs.


message 20: by Bentley, Group Founder, Leader, Chief (new)

Bentley | 27576 comments Thank you for some wonderful adds Aussie Rick.


message 21: by Laura (new)

Laura Snyder (LauraJSnyder) | 6 comments MEASURING THE VICTORIANS

I'm wondering what everyone here thinks about the story in today's New York Times (12/4/11) about the researchers who have put together a database of the titles of every work published in England during the "long 19th century"--all 1,681,161 of them. It is now possible to search for particular terms and statistically analyze their appearances. This will clearly influence scholarship on the Victorian period. Will this be for the better, or the worse, do you think?


message 22: by Bentley, Group Founder, Leader, Chief (new)

Bentley | 27576 comments At first glance Laura it sounds like it will be helpful.

What do you think about it.


message 23: by Laura (new)

Laura Snyder (LauraJSnyder) | 6 comments I always think that the more tools at the disposal of a historian, the better. But that's only if he or she is careful to interpret the statistical evidence as only one of many types of evidence. Otherwise you can have the "lies, damn lies, and statistics" problem!


message 24: by Bentley, Group Founder, Leader, Chief (new)

Bentley | 27576 comments Yes, I see your point; more to account for or to ascertain validity.


message 25: by Laura (new)

Laura Snyder (LauraJSnyder) | 6 comments Today is the birthday of Charles Babbage, Victorian visionary who invented the first computer, never built in his lifetime. The Computer History Museum in CA has an online exhibit which includes an amazing video of the replica of his Difference Engine no. 2, finally built in the twenty-first century.

Happy birthday, Babbage!

http://www.computerhistory.org/babbage/


message 26: by Bentley, Group Founder, Leader, Chief (new)

Bentley | 27576 comments What an interesting tidbit Laura and thank you very much for adding the link.


message 27: by 'Aussie Rick' (last edited Jan 07, 2011 07:10PM) (new)

'Aussie Rick' (AussieRick) I just purchased a 1977 hard back copy of "The Fields of War" edited by Philip Warner, recently re-released as; "Letters Home from the Crimea: A Young Cavalryman's Campaign".

Letters Home from the Crimea  A Young Cavalryman's Campaign (Military Memoirs) by Temple Godman by Temple Godman
Description:
Among the British troops bound for the Black Sea in May 1854 was a young officer in the 5th Dragoon Guards, Richard Temple Godman, who sent home throughout the entire Crimea campaign many detailed letters to his family at Park Hatch in Surrey. Temple Godman went out at the start of the war, took part in the successful Charge of the Heavy Brigade at Balaklava and in other engagements, and did not return to England until June 1856, after peace had been declared. He took three horses and despite all this adventures brought them back unscathed. Godman's letters provide a picture of what is was really like to be in the Crimea. His dispatches from the fields of war reveal his wide interests and varied experiences - they range from the pleasures of riding in a foreign landscape, smoking Turkish tobacco, and overcoming boredom by donning comic dress and hunting wild dogs, to the pain of seeing many friends and horses die from battle, disease, deprivation and lack of medicines. He writes scathinly about the rivalries and deficiencies of the generals in charge, inaccurate and "highly-coloured" newspapaer reports and, while critical of medial inefficiency regards women in hospitals as "a sort of fanaticism".

Review:
"Welcome reprint of the letters home from the battlefront of 1854-55 by Richard Temple-Godman, subaltern in the Fifth Dragoon Guards, who rode in the charge of the heavy brigade at Balaclava, survived two Crimean winters with hardly a scratch and brought all three of his horses home with him after Sebastopol surrendered. Masses of social and military detail, delightfully easy to read; many pictures from his family album (he died a major general), which established his standing, even if some of them are far from the Crimea." - Kirkus (UK


message 28: by Bryan, Assisting Moderator - Presidential Series (new)

Bryan Craig | 11251 comments Hey A.R.:

This is a good book which you might know about:

Queen Victoria's Little Wars by Byron Farwell by Byron Farwell

Description:
This is the story of what Rudyard Kipling called 'the savage wars of peace'. Throughout Queen Victoria's long reign there was not a single year in which, somewhere in the world, British soldiers were not fighting for her and her Empire. It tells the fascinating story of the little known and extraordinary small wars, and of the men who fought them.

These wars were the price on Empire, of world leadership and of national pride, and it was usually paid without qualms or regret; continuous warfare became an accepted way of life in the Victorian era, and in the process, the British Empire quadrupled in size. But, engrossing as these small wars are - and they bristle with bizarre, tragic and humorous incident - it is the officers and men who fought them that dominate the book. With their courage, foolhardiness and eccentricities, they are an unforgettable lot.


message 29: by 'Aussie Rick' (new)

'Aussie Rick' (AussieRick) Hi Bryan,

I read "Queen Victoria's Little Wars" some many years ago and quite enjoyed it. I'm glad you mentioned the book as I am sure other readers out there may find it an interesting account to read, thanks for the post.

Queen Victoria's Little Wars by Byron Farwell by Byron Farwell

Another very good book covering the same subject is Saul David's book "Victoria's Wars".

Victoria's Wars by Saul David by Saul David


message 30: by Bentley, Group Founder, Leader, Chief (new)

Bentley | 27576 comments Here is a book which investigates this time period:

The Italian Boy  A Tale of Murder and Body Snatching in 1830s London by Sarah Wise by Sarah Wise

Goodreads Write-up:

A thrilling history of England's great metropolis at a point of great change, told through the story of a young vagrant murdered by "resurrection men"

Before his murder in 1831, the "Italian boy" was one of thousands of orphans on the streets of London, moving among the livestock, hawkers, and con men, begging for pennies. When his body was sold to a London medical college, the suppliers were arrested for murder. Their high-profile trial would unveil London's furtive trade in human corpses carried out by body-snatchers-or "resurrection men"-who killed to satisfy the first rule of the cadaver market: the fresher the body, the higher the price.

Historian Sarah Wise reconstructs not only the boy's murder but the chaos and squalor of London that swallowed the fourteen-year-old vagrant long before his corpse appeared on the slab. In 1831, the city's poor were desperate and the wealthy were petrified, the population swelling so fast that old class borders could not possibly hold. All the while, early humanitarians were pushing legislation to protect the disenfranchised, the courts were establishing norms of punishment and execution, and doctors were pioneering the science of human anatomy.

As vivid and intricate as a novel by Charles Dickens, The Italian Boy restores to history the lives of the very poorest Londoners and offers an unparalleled account of the sights, sounds, and smells of a city at the brink of a major transformation.

Editorial Reviews

From Publishers Weekly

British historian Wise's well-written first book explores the grisly underbelly of pre-Victorian London by examining the trial of three "body snatchers," John Bishop, James May and Thomas Williams, who were arrested in 1831 while attempting to sell the suspiciously fresh cadaver of a teenage boy to a medical college. Drawing on astonishingly detailed research, Wise places the crime in context by describing how a shadowy "resurrection" trade in exhumed bodies had grown up to meet the rising demand of the new science of anatomy. She explains how various Londoners, including several Italians, testified that a hat found at Bishop's home matched that of a recently vanished Italian boy peddler. Soon the new London police force was sleuthing its way to the bottom of a case that caused widespread alarm and a media circus in a city notorious for its numbers of missing persons. Wise energetically explicates every twist of the evidence with fascinating detours into the wider social context of newly vulnerable urban family life, punitive poor laws and fragmented philanthropy. Biographies of the trio of body snatchers demystify the Victorian criminal. Wise's deft prose contributes vastly to our understanding of pre-Victorian London's everyday street life, districts, trades, policing, prisons and press. Meanwhile, she skillfully manages the narrative, keeping her story gripping without sensationalizing it. Generously illustrated, this is a macabre yet historically serious work, invaluable to anyone interested in the truth of London's gory past.
Copyright © Reed Business Information, a division of Reed Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

From School Library Journal

Adult/High School–Making good use of scant information, Wise chronicles one of the most celebrated crimes of the 19th century, perpetrated by the dreaded "Resurrection Men." These were grave robbers engaged in the lucrative practice of providing London's medical schools with cadavers for dissection. As demand exceeded supply, some turned to homicide, especially since the freshest bodies brought the highest reward. By the end of the book, readers have gained knowledge of the controversial creation of Robert Peal's "bobbies," the primitive origins of crime-scene investigation, and the conduct of British jury trials of the period. The author describes the exponential growth of the city in the first third of the 19th century, the precarious economic situation of the lower population strata, and the poverty and filth that so appalled later Victorians and led them to take corrective action. She explains why Italian boys–and many other children–called the streets of London home and why the poor were perpetual crime victims. This engrossing and suspenseful blending of sociology, history, and true crime will appeal to both researchers and casual readers.–Dori DeSpain, Fairfax County Public Library, VA -

From Booklist

At the time of the 1831 murder of the "Italian Boy," body snatchers would grab orphans on the streets of London and dispatch them. The so-called resurrection men would sell the bodies to medical colleges for students to dissect; the fresher the body, the higher the price. Wise has based the narrative of this particular case on the London Times' reports of the inquest, the committal proceedings, and the trial of three men charged in the boy's death. Other sources include newspapers and journals, books, reports of parliamentary select committees, police reports, and Old Bailey sessions. In chronicling the murder of the 14-year-old boy (who was thought to be Italian), Wise offers a picture of the squalor of London and its poor in the late 1820s and early 1830s. Some of the people were literate, many were not; all of them lived in what Wise calls "a giant cesspit in^B its sinuous streets and unlit warrens." The author, a brilliant historian and storyteller, has captured with unerring immediacy the history of London and its people in that era. George Cohen
Copyright © American Library Association.

Reviews

'Rich and enthralling... History at its most shamefully entertaining.' -- Michael Faber

`A haunting blend of scholarship and period empathy.' -- Iain Sinclair

`A work of great skill and sympathy... Shines a great light upon the lives of the very poor. For any student of the city and its secret life, it is indispensable reading.' -- Peter Ackroyd, The Times (London)

`I wish I had written The Italian Boy, but alas, Sarah Wise got there first, and did so in style...a compelling piece of history writing.' -- Bernard Cornwell, Mail on Sunday (London)

`Sensitive, meticulous... told with exceptional skill, humor and sympathy.' -- Fiona MacCarthy, The New York Review of Books

"A work of great skill and sympathy, a meditation on one of the sorrowful mysteries once to be found on the streets of London. For any student of the city and its secret life, it is indispensable reading."
-Peter Ackroyd, The Times (London)

Before his murder in 1831, the "Italian boy" was one of thousands of orphans on the streets of London, begging among the livestock, hawkers, and con men. When his body was sold to a medical college, the suppliers were arrested for murder. Their high-profile trial would unveil a furtive trade in human corpses carried out by "resurrection men" who killed to satisfy the first rule of the cadaver market: the fresher the body, the higher the price.

Historian Sarah Wise reconstructs not only the boy's murder but the chaos and squalor of his world. In 1831 London, the poor were desperate and the wealthy petrified, the population swelling so fast that class borders could not hold. All the while, early humanitarians were attempting to protect the disenfranchised, the courts were establishing norms of punishment, and doctors were pioneering the science of anatomy.

As vivid and intricate as a novel by Charles Dickens, The Italian Boy restores to history the lives of the very poorest Londoners and offers an unparalleled account of England's great metropolis at the brink of a major transformation.

About the Author
A historian of Victorian England, Sarah Wise has written for The Guardian, The Observer, The Independent on Sunday, and several magazines. The Italian Boy is her first book. She lives in London.
Excerpt. © Reprinted by permission. All rights reserved.
From The Italian Boy:

Urban poverty, so often a disgusting and harrowing sight to the respectable, could also be a source of wonder and intrigue. A beggar with a certain look, or air, or "act," could feed on city dwellers' craving for novelty and display. To London's grimmest streets, to a population with little access to books or periodicals, and no access to parks, zoos, galleries, or museums—Italian boys brought music, intriguing objects, and strange animals, plus, in many cases, their own beauty. The economies of the Italian states had been devastated by the Napoleonic Wars and throughout the 1820s there was large-scale migration, with many Italian artisans moving to northern European cities to pursue their trades. While later in the century Italian street children would be known for playing musical instruments and dancing, until the mid-1830s their principal source of income was exhibiting small animals as well as wax and plaster figures. The objects and creatures were rented out to the boys each morning by padroni who ran the trade. All in all, Italy was providing London with a better class of vagrant. The pathos an Italian boy evoked could earn his master six or seven shillings a day. Dead—and apparently murdered to supply the surgeons—his appeal only seemed to increase.


message 31: by Bentley, Group Founder, Leader, Chief (last edited Apr 20, 2011 03:45PM) (new)

Bentley | 27576 comments How about a Victorian Detective?

The Suspicions of Mr. Whicher by Kate Summerscale Kate SummerscaleKate Summerscale

Goodreads Write-up:

The dramatic story of the real-life murder that inspired the birth of modern detective fiction.

In June of 1860 three-year-old Saville Kent was found at the bottom of an outdoor privy with his throat slit. The crime horrified all England and led to a national obsession with detection, ironically destroying, in the process, the career of perhaps the greatest detective in the land.

At the time, the detective was a relatively new invention; there were only eight detectives in all of England and rarely were they called out of London, but this crime was so shocking, as Kate Summerscale relates in her scintillating new book, that Scotland Yard sent its best man to investigate, Inspector Jonathan Whicher.

Whicher quickly believed the unbelievable—that someone within the family was responsible for the murder of young Saville Kent. Without sufficient evidence or a confession, though, his case was circumstantial and he returned to London a broken man. Though he would be vindicated five years later, the real legacy of Jonathan Whicher lives on in fiction: the tough, quirky, knowing, and all-seeing detective that we know and love today…from the cryptic Sgt. Cuff in Wilkie Collins’s The Moonstone to Dashiell Hammett’s Sam Spade.

The Suspicions of Mr. Whicher is a provocative work of nonfiction that reads like a Victorian thriller, and in it Kate Summerscale has fashioned a brilliant, multilayered narrative that is as cleverly constructed as it is beautifully written

Awards:

Galaxy British Book Awards for Book of the Year (2009), Edgar Award Nominee for Best Fact Crime (2009)


message 32: by Jill, Assisting Moderator - Military Hist L/Global NF/Eur/Brit/Music (new)

Jill Hutchinson (Bucs1960) | 8303 comments I picked up a little book at the library which re-tells the Charge of the Light Brigade.The Reason Why by Cecil Woodham-Smith. It is a "pull no punches" history of that fateful military blunder and I found it exciting and tragic. I would recommend it highly. I am now trying to find THE HOMICIDAL EARL: LIFE OF LORD CARDIGAN by Saul David which is the biography of Lord Cardigan. I just finished David's book on George IV and the Regency,Prince of Pleasure: The Prince of Wales and the Making of the Regency which was good but did bog down sometimes with detail about the inf-fighting among the Whigs, Tories, and the Monarchy.


message 33: by Bentley, Group Founder, Leader, Chief (new)

Bentley | 27576 comments Hello Jill,

I just want to jump in and ask you to do our citations according to our guidelines.

Whenever citing any books or even just authors; you must add the book cover, the author's photo when available and always the author's link. So before adding any other books please read our guidelines.


message 34: by Jill, Assisting Moderator - Military Hist L/Global NF/Eur/Brit/Music (new)

Jill Hutchinson (Bucs1960) | 8303 comments You caught me again before I totally went off the rails.......will re-read the guidelines. Sorry about my goof!!!!


message 35: by 'Aussie Rick' (new)

'Aussie Rick' (AussieRick) Hi Jill, I also enjoyed "The Reason Why" by Cecil Woodham-Smith. Another book on the subject I enjoyed was; "The Charge" by Mark Adkin.

I have copies of but am yet to read; "Hell Riders: The Truth about the Charge of the Light Brigade" by Terry Brighton and "The Homicidal Earl" by Saul David.


The Reason Why  The Story of the Fatal Charge of the Light Brigade by Cecil Woodham-Smith by Cecil Woodham-Smith

The Charge by Mark Adkin by Mark Adkin

Hell Riders  The Truth about the Charge of the Light Brigade by Terry Brighton by Terry Brighton

THE HOMICIDAL EARL  LIFE OF LORD CARDIGAN by Saul David by Saul David


message 36: by Bentley, Group Founder, Leader, Chief (new)

Bentley | 27576 comments Jill, Aussie Rick added most of them - in terms of our citations guidelines. I think this one you mentioned was missed.

Prince of Pleasure  The Prince of Wales and the Making of the Regency by Saul David by Saul David

Since Saul David's photo was not available, we only added two of the three parts: the bookcover and the author's link otherwise we add the author's photo as well.


message 37: by Bentley, Group Founder, Leader, Chief (new)

Bentley | 27576 comments Jill, Aussie Rick added most of them - in terms of our citations guidelines. I think this one you mentioned was missed.

Prince of Pleasure  The Prince of Wales and the Making of the Regency by Saul David by Saul David

Since Saul David's photo was not available, we only added two of the three parts: the bookcover and the author's link otherwise we add the author's photo as well.

Aussie Rick, Terry Brighton's photo was available so we need to cite it like this:

Hell Riders  The Truth about the Charge of the Light Brigade (John MacRae Books) by Terry Brighton by Terry BrightonTerry Brighton


message 38: by 'Aussie Rick' (new)

'Aussie Rick' (AussieRick) I picked up a nice book today at a second hand book shop covering a personal account of the Indian Mutiny by Lieutenant Richard Barter who was a young officer in the 75th Gordon Highlanders stationed in India.

The Siege of Delhi by Richard Barter by Richard Barter

I can also recommend the following two books on the Indian Mutiny:

Great Mutiny  India 1857 by Christopher Hibbert by Christopher Hibbert
Description:
A beautifully written and meticulously researched narrative history of the great Indian uprising of 1857 by one of our most acclaimed living historians. First published in 1978 and re-issued with a handsome new cover for the 2002 paperback edition.

The Indian Mutiny by Saul David by Saul David
Description:
In 1857 the native troops of the Bengal army rose against their colonial masters. The ensuing insurrection was to become the bloodiest in the history of the British Empire.Combining formidable storytelling with ground-breaking research, Saul David narrates a tale at once heart-rendingly tragic and extraordinarily compelling. David provides new and convincing evidence that the true causes of the mutiny were much more complex, and disturbing, than previously assumed.


Another book on the subject that I am yet to read is:

The Indian Mutiny by Julian Spilsbury by Julian Spilsbury
Description:
The Indian Mutiny is a real page-turner, an epic story with surprising modern parallels. Fomer army officer-turned-TV scriptwriter, Julian Spilsbury is the ideal author to take us back to the desperate summer of 1857 when thousands of Indian soldiers mutinied. They murdered their officers, hunted down the women and children and burned and slaughtered their way to Delhi. The tiny British garrison at Lucknow held out against all odds; the one at Cawnpore surrendered only to be betrayed and massacred. Modern Indian accounts call this 'the first war of liberation', but as Julian Spilsbury reveals, 80 per cent of the so-called 'British' forces were from the sub-continent. Sikhs, Gurkhas and Afghans fought alongside small numbers of British soldiers. Together, they faced terrible odds and won. In the process they created a new army that would play a vital role in the Allied forces in both World Wars. Julian Spilsbury weaves the story together from some of the most vivid eyewitness accounts ever written. From the women and children hiding from blood-crazed mobs, to the epic battles that decided the campaign, to the grisly revenge exacted by the British forces, this is a gripping recreation of the greatest crisis of Empire.


message 39: by Bentley, Group Founder, Leader, Chief (new)

Bentley | 27576 comments Thank you so much Aussie Rick for your adds to these threads.


message 40: by Jill, Assisting Moderator - Military Hist L/Global NF/Eur/Brit/Music (new)

Jill Hutchinson (Bucs1960) | 8303 comments Another book of interest that I don't believe has been cited here is:



Eminent Victorians  by Giles Lytton Strachey Giles Lytton Strachey by Giles Lytton Strachey

It is a not very flattering look at four public figures of the era; Cardinal Henry Manning, Florence Nightingale, Dr.Thomas Arnold, and General Charles "Chinese" Gordon. The book caused quite a controversy when it was published in 1918 but has since gained status as one of the most insightful and influential biographical studies ever written.


message 41: by Bentley, Group Founder, Leader, Chief (new)

Bentley | 27576 comments Thank you once again Jill. We really appreciate the adds.


message 42: by Jill, Assisting Moderator - Military Hist L/Global NF/Eur/Brit/Music (new)

Jill Hutchinson (Bucs1960) | 8303 comments You are quite welcome......it appears that we all have read many of the same books although I am adding to my TBR list from some of the recommendations found here. This is a wonderful group for those of us who love history.
PS....I think I have finally mastered the citation rules!!!


message 43: by Bentley, Group Founder, Leader, Chief (new)

Bentley | 27576 comments Yes it is and good for you. You are doing great.


message 44: by Bryan, Assisting Moderator - Presidential Series (new)

Bryan Craig | 11251 comments Here is a standard survey for this period:

England 1870-1914 (Oxford History of England Series) by Robert Ensor by Robert Ensor

Product info:
First published in 1936, this now-classic volume spans a time of rapid and far-reaching change in England--from Gladstone's first ministry, through the great contest with Disraeli, the Home Rule debate, the establishment of the Labour moverment, the Boer War, and the Liberal reforms of 1909-10, to the end of an era marked by the catastrophe of 1914. With stimulating analyses of social and economic developments as well as domestic and foreign policy, Ensor's account serves as a superb introduction to the period it covers and offers insight into the world of the 1930s in which it was written.


message 45: by Robert (last edited Jul 11, 2011 08:47AM) (new)

Robert Clear (RobertClear) | 10 comments I've been reading a very interesting book, which I can recommend: The Empire Project: The Rise and Fall of the British World-System, 1830-1970
The Empire Project  The Rise and Fall of the British World-System, 1830-1970 by John Darwin

It's a fascinating exploration of the dynamics of British imperialism from the perspective of what we now call globalisation.


message 46: by Bryan, Assisting Moderator - Presidential Series (new)

Bryan Craig | 11251 comments Impressive book, Robert. It looks very interesting. A great job on the citation. If a book has a cover, then you don't need a title, and don't forget the author citation. Here you go:

The Empire Project  The Rise and Fall of the British World-System, 1830-1970 by John DarwinJohn Darwin

Thanks for sharing with us; I'm going to have to read it.


message 47: by Rose (new)

Rose fleming | 4 comments I read this book about Victoria and I found very interesting.

Becoming Queen by Kate Williams

I found it really absorbing as not only does it recount the life of Victoria but also princess Charlotte who died before she could be queen.


message 48: by 'Aussie Rick' (new)

'Aussie Rick' (AussieRick) Hi Rose, another good post, well done, don't forget to post a link to the author of the book:

Becoming Queen by Kate Williams by Kate WilliamsKate Williams


message 49: by Rose (new)

Rose fleming | 4 comments Ok sorry


message 50: by 'Aussie Rick' (new)

'Aussie Rick' (AussieRick) That's OK, just takes practice, you'll get use to it, it just helps others find the author and their books easier.


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