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message 1: by Bentley, Group Founder, Leader, Chief (last edited Apr 19, 2012 07:42PM) (new)

Bentley | 24005 comments The Ancient History folder will follow the standard timeline definition. We will use the following as the standard for what threads and interest areas will be developed.

Ancient history is the study of the written past from the beginning of recorded human history in the Old World until the Early Middle Ages in Europe and the Qin Dynasty in China.

The period or era following these events includes the Imperial era in China and the period of the Middle Kingdoms in India. The span of recorded history altogether is roughly 5,000 years, with Sumerian cuneiform emerging from the protoliterate period around the 30th century BC being the oldest form of writing discovered so far.

This is the beginning of history, as opposed to prehistory, according to the definition used by most historians.

The term classical antiquity is often used to refer to ancient history since the beginning of recorded Greek history in about 776 BC (First Olympiad).

This coincides, roughly, with the traditional date of the founding of Rome in 753 BC, the beginning of the history of ancient Rome. Although the ending date of ancient history is disputed, Western scholars use the fall of the Western Roman Empire in AD 476, or the death of the emperor Justinian I, or the coming of Islam and the rise of Charlemagne as the end of ancient European history.


Source: Wikipedia

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ancient_...

Timeline

At a broad level, this is the timeline we will be discussing in this folder:

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ancient_...

Threads are set up for the following interest areas:

PREHISTORY
- (Includes The Stone Age, The Bronze Age, and the The Iron Age)

ANCIENT NEAR EAST
- (Includes Sumer · Akkad · Babylonia · Hittite Empire · Syro-Hittite states
Neo-Assyrian Empire · Urartu)

ANCIENT AFRICA
- (Includes Egypt · Nubia · Land of Punt · Axum · Nok · Carthage)

CLASSICAL ANTIQUITY
- (Includes Archaic Greece · Median Empire . Classical Greece ·
Achaemenid Empire · Seleucid Empire · Dacia · Thrace · Scythia ·
Macedon · Roman Republic · Roman Empire · Parthia . Parthian Empire ·
Sassanid Empire · Late Antiquity)

EAST ASIA
- (Includes Hồng Bàng Dynasty · Gojoseon · Shang China · Qin Dynasty ·
Han Dynasty · Jin Dynasty

SOUTH ASIA
- (Includes Vedic India · Maha Janapadas · Mauryan India · Chola India ·
Satavahana India · Gupta India

PRE-COLUMBIAN AMERICAS
- (Includes Aztecs · Incas · Mayas · Olmecs · Teotihuacan)

BYZANTINE EMPIRE



message 2: by Bentley, Group Founder, Leader, Chief (last edited Nov 11, 2009 02:29AM) (new)

Bentley | 24005 comments There is a new program called "Ancient Discoveries" on The History Channel which may be of interest to those who like to watch programs on antiquities and first history topics: (some of the upcoming episodes deal with ancient Greece and Troy while others deal with what I consider more modern topics - still interesting):

http://www.history.com/content/ancien...


'Aussie Rick' (AussieRick) I hate to do this but I love the Ancient period, from Alexander the Great to the fall of the Roman Empire. If its OK I would like to mention just a few good books in case other people are looking for something to read and I'd be more than happy to discuss any good book.

The Punic Wars by Adrian Goldsworthy & Caesar  Life of a Colossus by Adrian Goldsworthy & How Rome Fell  Death of a Superpower by Adrian Goldsworthy by Adrian Goldsworthy


Augustus  The Life of Rome's First Emperor by Anthony Everitt & Cicero  The Life and Times of Rome's Greatest Politician by Anthony Everitt & Hadrian and the Triumph of Rome by Anthony Everitt by Anthony Everitt These last two I haven't read yet but 'Augustus' was a great story.

In Quest of the Lost Legions by Major J A S Clunn by Major J A S Clunn Marcus Aurelius by Frank McLynnFrank McLynn Haven't read this title yet.

Scipio Africanus  Greater Than Napoleon by B.H. Liddell HartB.H. Liddell Hart (A classic) [image error] & [image error] by Gaius Julius Caesar

Cleopatra and Antony by Diana Preston by Diana Preston Alexander of Macedon 356-323 B.C.  A Historical Biography by Peter Green by Peter Green

These following titles I have not actually read yet:
The Gothic War by Torsten Cumberland Jacobsen by Torsten Cumberland Jacobsen
[image error] by Philip Matyszak
Jerusalem's Traitor  Josephus, Masada, and the Fall of Judea by Desmond Seward by Desmond Seward

This next series of books are excellent accounts but beware that they were first published in the 1890's

Alexander  A History of the Origin and Growth of the Art of War from the Earliest Times to the Battle of Ipsus, 301 Bc by Theodore Ayrault Dodge & Hannibal by Theodore Ayrault Dodge & Caesar  A History of the Art of War Among the Romans Down to the End of the Roman Empire, With a Detailed Account of the Campaigns of Caius Julius Caesar by Theodore Ayrault Dodge by Theodore Ayrault Dodge

And my latest and most interesting acquisition:

The Empire Stops Here  A Journey along the Frontiers of the Roman World by Philip Parker by Philip Parker

I have many many more books in my library covering this period including the Celts. I hope a few people find the above titles of interest and it sparks some talk or an interest in reading about this period.


message 4: by Bentley, Group Founder, Leader, Chief (new)

Bentley | 24005 comments Goodness, gracious Aussie Rick..you even found the interest area under construction...good for you. Well what a great start.


'Aussie Rick' (AussieRick) Bentley wrote: "Goodness, gracious Aussie Rick..you even found the interest area under construction...good for you. Well what a great start."

Hi Bentley, I couldn't help myself. I love this period of history, something about the Roman Legions and their march into the unknown world (to them at least). A period of great men & leaders, great battles and campaigns.


message 6: by Bentley, Group Founder, Leader, Chief (new)

Bentley | 24005 comments That is OK...better that I move it along (smile)


message 7: by Bentley, Group Founder, Leader, Chief (new)

Bentley | 24005 comments This may be of interest:

http://www.bbc.co.uk/history/ancient/


message 8: by Bentley, Group Founder, Leader, Chief (new)

Bentley | 24005 comments ANCIENT HISTORY - THE OPEN DIRECTORY PROJECT:

http://www.dmoz.org/Society/History/B...


message 9: by Bentley, Group Founder, Leader, Chief (new)

Bentley | 24005 comments Ancient History Gateway - Directory of Online Ancient History Resources

http://www.academicinfo.net/histanc.html


message 10: by Bentley, Group Founder, Leader, Chief (new)

Bentley | 24005 comments ANCIENT HISTORY RESOURCE:

http://www.historesearch.com/ancient....


message 11: by Bentley, Group Founder, Leader, Chief (new)

Bentley | 24005 comments BRITISH MUSEUM'S website on various topics of ancient civilizations:

http://www.ancientcivilizations.co.uk...


message 12: by Bentley, Group Founder, Leader, Chief (new)

Bentley | 24005 comments INTERNET ANCIENT HISTORY SOURCEBOOK:

http://www.fordham.edu/HALSALL/ancien...


message 13: by Bentley, Group Founder, Leader, Chief (new)

Bentley | 24005 comments PERSEUS DIGITAL LIBRARY:

http://www.perseus.tufts.edu/hopper/


message 14: by Bentley, Group Founder, Leader, Chief (new)


message 15: by Bentley, Group Founder, Leader, Chief (new)

Bentley | 24005 comments JEWISH HISTORY RESOURCE CENTER:

http://www.dinur.org/1.html?rsID=219


message 16: by Bentley, Group Founder, Leader, Chief (last edited Nov 20, 2009 04:45AM) (new)

Bentley | 24005 comments CLIO HISTORY JOURNAL

http://cliojournal.wikispaces.com/

CLIO'S ANCIENT HISTORY PAGE:

http://cliojournal.wikispaces.com/Anc...


message 17: by Bentley, Group Founder, Leader, Chief (new)

Bentley | 24005 comments Symposion b: The Five Great Battles of Antiquity (Complete)

http://video.google.com/videoplay?doc...#

Their synopsis:

This is the complete, 2.5 hour presentation and discussion of the ancient battles of Marathon, Salamis, Chaeronea, Gaugamela, and Cannae with a narrative history from 550 - 168 BC. The main topics are the Greco-Persian Wars, the Campaigns of Alexander, and the Second Punic War. The Peloponnesian War, Xenophon's March of the Ten Thousand, and Spartan and Theban Hegemonies are included. Battles at Thymbra, Opis, Thermopylae, Plataea, Mycale, Leuctra, Granicus River, Issus, Tyre, Ticinus River, Trebia River, Lake Trasimene, Zama, Cynoscephalae and Pydna are also discussed. Specific mention is made of Nebuchadnezzar, Cyrus, Croesus, Cambyses, Darius I, Miltiades, Xerxes, Leonidas, Themistocles, Gelon, Aeschylus, Euripides, Pericles, Socrates, Alcibiades, Plato, Xenophon, Epaminondas, Philip II, Aristotle, Alexander the Great, Parmenio, Darius III, Hannibal, Scipio Aemilianus, Hasdrubal, and Scipio Africanus. Specs: Over 100 color slides including --dozens of maps depicting ancient geography, invasion routes, etc. --diagrams demonstrating detailed tactical troop movements for five history-changing battles --images of arms and armour of the various military units involved --extant images of some of the great figures of the ancient world. 2 hours and 25 minutes of --narrative history of the period from 550 to 168 BC --discussion of the causes and consequences of the major events during this period --discussion of the major cultures and societies of the Ancient Mediterranean --step-by-step explanations of battle tactics. A higher resolution (640 x 480) version is available for download above. Maps are much easier to see with better resolution. If you would like to purchase a DVD with excellent resolution (good enough for crisp pictures on any big-screen TV) for cost plus shipping, email symposionlectures@gmail.com. Visit symposionlectures.googlepages.com for other lectures and visual aids.


message 18: by Bentley, Group Founder, Leader, Chief (new)

Bentley | 24005 comments Symposion c: The History of Anatomic Inquiry

http://video.google.com/videoplay?doc...#

Their synopsis:

This lecture traces the advances in the systematic study of human anatomy through history. Beginning with early civilizations and advancing chronologically through Egypt, Greece, Rome, Medieval Islam and Europe, it finally arrives at the Renaissance and beyond when scientific progress rapidly accelerated. The great figures of the discipline including Aristotle, Herophilus, Erasistratus, Galen, Avicenna, Ibn al-Nafis, Leonardo da Vinci, and Andreas Vesalius are discussed in detail. A short question and answer session concludes this 46 minute discussion.


message 20: by Bentley, Group Founder, Leader, Chief (new)

Bentley | 24005 comments Thanks Susanna..this segment is under constuction. You might want to place the books on the specific interest thread when the threads are set up and/or you can leave them here.


message 21: by Bentley, Group Founder, Leader, Chief (last edited Nov 21, 2009 07:37AM) (new)

Bentley | 24005 comments ATLAS OF THE HUMAN JOURNEY:

https://genographic.nationalgeographi...

National Geographic Site - very worthwhile

The Genographic Project


message 22: by Bentley, Group Founder, Leader, Chief (new)


'Aussie Rick' (AussieRick) Hi Hecate, what period and area of Asian civilisation are you interested in?


message 24: by Bentley, Group Founder, Leader, Chief (new)

Bentley | 24005 comments Hecate...are you interested in ancient asian civilization or more modern history. Because you are in the Ancient History thread.


'Aussie Rick' (AussieRick) This is one area of history that I have not read much on (Asian ancient history), except the Huns and Mongels. I have two books on the Great wall of China, one being:

The Great Wall by John Man by John Man


'Aussie Rick' (AussieRick) Its an interesting area, I've visited parts of South-east Asia and should read more of the history. My interest sort of takes off during WW2 but I should go back a bit further. Any good books you could recommend that offers a decent overview of this period?


Susanna - Censored by GoodReads (SusannaG) I read this one ( India  A History by John Keay by John Keay) a few years ago and found it very interesting.


'Aussie Rick' (AussieRick) Hi Susanna, thanks for that, I have one of this author's books on the Middle East so I will look around for a copy of this book on India, appreciate the information.


Lenin | 2 comments 'Aussie Rick' wrote: "I hate to do this but I love the Ancient period, from Alexander the Great to the fall of the Roman Empire. If its OK I would like to mention just a few good books in case other people are looking f..."

Hi Aussie Rick: Can you please suggest any good book which details out the history of christianity and Islam in a chronological manner.


'Aussie Rick' (AussieRick) Hi Lenin,

Sorry in the late reply. I know of a few books that may help, let me dig around in my library and I'll get back to you with some titles & details.


'Aussie Rick' (AussieRick) Lenin wrote: "'Aussie Rick' wrote: "I hate to do this but I love the Ancient period, from Alexander the Great to the fall of the Roman Empire. If its OK I would like to mention just a few good books in case othe..."

Hi Lenin,
The one good book that I have read that 'sort' of covers this area is:

The First Century  Emperors, Gods and Everyman by William K. Klingaman by William K. Klingaman
Reviews:
"Parallels between East and West abound in this robust, readable history of the first century. For example, both Augustus Caesar and Chinese emperor Wang Mang, usurper of the Han throne, saw themselves as saviors of battered, debauched civilizations. While the Chinese reannexed the newly independent state of Vietnam led by the two courageous Trung sisters (40-43 C.E.), insecure Claudius sent Roman warlord Vespasian to crush a rebellion in Britain. Klingaman ( 1929: The Year of the Great Crash ) focuses on some 20 central characters in an engrossing, cinematic narrative which regrettably excludes Africa and the Americas and selectively glances at India, Asia Minor and Western Europe. At center stage is itinerant preacher Jesus, waging a cataclysmic holy war to liberate Israel from its state of sin." - Publishers Weekly

"Since American culture often hedges between Christian and Oriental spiritual thought, sometimes opting to combine the two for a personalized belief system, there is clearly a need to put these two spiritual forces into historical perspective. Klingaman has done just that in his engrossing narrative of the first century A.D. He brings together Augustus Caesar, the ascension of Wang Mang, the poet Ovid, the notorious glutton Claudius, Jesus and his deviation from conventional Judaic tradition, and the spread of Mahayana Buddhism to make an intriguing comparison between Asian and Mediterranean political, military, and spiritual development. The author's attempt to recreate the atmosphere of the era will certainly appeal to lay people, but the lack of annotation will disappoint more serious scholars and students. As a sweeping historical overview of the birth of Christianity and Buddhism, this volume is both engaging and enlightening." - Library Journal

I don't think it goes into too much detail about the rise of Islam though so I will see what other books I have in my library that may help.


Lenin | 2 comments Hi A. Rick,

Thanks very much for refering the book. let me know if you are interested in knowing indian history. i can suggest some books.


'Aussie Rick' (AussieRick) Lenin wrote: "Hi A. Rick,

Thanks very much for refering the book. let me know if you are interested in knowing indian history. i can suggest some books."


Hi Lenin, I have not read much on Indian history other than some books that cover the British Empire period. I am sure many of the readers here would appreciate any good recommendations, maybe the thread below would be the best place for them:

ancient-south-asia-history


Robert Clear (RobertClear) | 10 comments Just joined The History Book Club and stumbled across this folder. I'm doing a PhD on Ancient Greek history and literature, so this looks like the place for me! My focus is on the fifth century BC poet Pindar, in case anyone else shares an interest.


message 35: by Bentley, Group Founder, Leader, Chief (new)

Bentley | 24005 comments Glad to have you with us; even when we mention just authors or poets; we do a citation:

Pindar (oddly enough no photo)


Terrence | 18 comments I have a hard time finding history books, especially about this period, that aren't really dry and academic, so if you're looking for an engaging read that challenges some of the traditionally held beliefs:

The First Clash  The Miraculous Greek Victory at Marathon and Its Impact on Western Civilization by Jim Lacey by Jim Lacey


message 37: by Bentley, Group Founder, Leader, Chief (last edited Aug 17, 2011 08:30AM) (new)

Bentley | 24005 comments For those of you interested in the book posted in message 36, here is the goodreads write-up:

Marathon—one of history’s most pivotal battles. Its very name evokes images of almost superhuman courage, endurance, and fighting spirit. But until now, the story of what happened at Marathon has been told exclusively through the narrow viewpoint of specialists in antiquity. In this eye-opening new book, acclaimed journalist Jim Lacey, both a military historian and a combat veteran, takes a fresh look at Marathon and reveals why the battle happened, how it was fought, and whether, in fact, it saved Western civilization.

Lacey brilliantly reconstructs the world of the fifth century B.C. leading up to the astonishing military defeat of the Persian Empire by the vastly undermanned but determined Greek defenders. Using the seminal work of Herodotus as his starting point, Lacey reconstructs the tactical and strategic scenario of the battle, including how many combatants each side might have used and who actually led the Greeks. He also disputes the long-repeated myths of Athenian inexperience and effete Persian arrogance.

With the kind of vivid detail that characterizes the best modern war reportage, Lacey shows how the heavily armed Persian army was shocked, demoralized, and ultimately defeated by the relentless assault of the Athenian phalanx, which battered the Persian line in a series of brutal attacks. He reveals the fascinating aftermath of Marathon, how its fighters became the equivalent of our “Greatest Generation,” and challenges the view of many historians that Marathon ultimately proved the Greek “Western way of war” to be the superior strategy for fighting—and winning—battles to the present day.

Immediate, visceral, and full of new analyses that defy decades of conventional wisdom, The First Clash is a superb interpretation of a conflict that indeed made the world safe for Aristotle, Plato, and our own modern democracy. But it was also a battle whose legacy and lessons have often been misunderstood—perhaps, now more than ever, at our own peril.

The First Clash  The Miraculous Greek Victory at Marathon and Its Impact on Western Civilization by Jim Lacey by Jim Lacey


message 38: by Kathy, Assisting Moderator - Health/Med/Science, Ancient History (new)

Kathy (Kathy_H) | 2053 comments Wikibooks has a site on Ancient History.

http://en.wikibooks.org/wiki/Ancient_...

This project is a complete survey of Ancient History, listed by country and divided into the categories of Old World, New World, and Miscellaneous. The free nature of this project opens it to modification and change.

Instead of a chronological approach to history, this text assumes a geographical perspective. However, as it is important to also understand broad patterns within ancient history, each chapter covers a variety of material, though its title may suggest a specific region rather than a time period.

Many topics are still under construction, but an interesting visit.


message 39: by Bentley, Group Founder, Leader, Chief (new)

Bentley | 24005 comments Good find.


message 40: by Bentley, Group Founder, Leader, Chief (new)

Bentley | 24005 comments Here is something very interesting - it is called the Histomap:

The link:

http://www.slate.com/blogs/the_vault/...


message 41: by Kathy, Assisting Moderator - Health/Med/Science, Ancient History (new)

Kathy (Kathy_H) | 2053 comments BBC has a nice section on Ancient History.



http://www.bbc.co.uk/history/ancient/


Mun | 3 comments Hello everyone, I'm looking for opinions and also recommendations on books that covers the history timelines in general to serves as my reading guidelines in Ancient History.

Im thinking to read it as a fundamentals before goes into books that covers specific time period.

Anyone read or any opinions on these books below;

The History of the Ancient World  From the Earliest Accounts to the Fall of Rome by Susan Wise Bauer

The History of the Medieval World  From the Conversion of Constantine to the First Crusade by Susan Wise Bauer

The History of the Renaissance World  From the Rediscovery of Aristotle to the Conquest of Constantinople by Susan Wise Bauer,

Thanks again, and looking forward for it.


message 43: by Kathy, Assisting Moderator - Health/Med/Science, Ancient History (last edited Dec 21, 2013 11:43AM) (new)

Kathy (Kathy_H) | 2053 comments Hi Mun. I noticed that Aussie Rick gave the first in the series 4 stars, and marked the other two as to-read. I haven't read these myself though.

Be sure to include the author in your citations, like this:

The History of the Ancient World  From the Earliest Accounts to the Fall of Rome by Susan Wise Bauer The History of the Medieval World  From the Conversion of Constantine to the First Crusade by Susan Wise Bauer The History of the Renaissance World  From the Rediscovery of Aristotle to the Conquest of Constantinople by Susan Wise Bauer by Susan Wise BauerSusan Wise Bauer


Mun | 3 comments Hi Kathy, glad to know that and thanks for sharing. will definitely include the author next time. make it easy to refers to.

:D


message 45: by Kathy, Assisting Moderator - Health/Med/Science, Ancient History (new)

Kathy (Kathy_H) | 2053 comments Thanks, Mun. I agree.


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