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JoAnn/QuAppelle | 1608 comments Mod
This thread is for (mostly) Schmerguls to post about authors who have passed away.


Schmerguls | 215 comments Thank you, JoAnn. I would hope that whenever an author you have read dies you would all note it and tell what you have read by her or him and what you though of what you read,


Donna in Southern Maryland (Cedarville922) | 133 comments Mod
Does anyone remember Frank Yerby ? This thread made me look him up on Wiki:

Frank Garvin Yerby (September 5, 1916(1916-09-05) – November 29, 1991) was an African American historical novelist. He is best known as the first African American to write a best-selling novel and to have a book purchased by a Hollywood studio for a film adaptation.[1:] Born in Augusta, Georgia to Rufus Garvin Yerby, an African American, and Wilhelmina Smythe, who was caucasian, Yerby was originally noted for writing romance novels set in the Antebellum South. In mid-century, Yerby embarked on a series of best-selling historical novels ranging from the Athens of Pericles to Europe in the Dark Ages. Yerby took considerable pains in research, and often footnoted his historical novels. In all, he wrote 33 novels. In 1946, he became the first African-American to publish a best-seller with The Foxes of Harrow. That same year he also became the first African-American to have a book purchased for screen adaptation by a Hollywood studio, when 20th Century Fox optioned Foxes. Ultimately, the book became a 1947 Oscar-nominated film starring Rex Harrison and Maureen O'Hara.

Yerby left the United States in 1955 in protest against racial discrimination, moving to Spain (then under the Franco regime), where he remained for the rest of his life. Frank Yerby died from congestive heart failure in Madrid and was interred there in the Cementerio de la Almudena.


His old Historical novels were the some of the first things I remember reading as a teenager. I had an aunt who lived with us for a while, and she left some of his books behind. I devoured them:

The Foxes of Harrow (1946)
The Vixens (1947)
The Golden Hawk (1948)
Pride's Castle (1949)
Floodtide (1950)
A Woman Called Fancy (1951)
The Saracen Blade (1952)
The Devil's Laughter (1953)
Bride of Liberty (1954)
Benton's Row (1954)
The Treasure of Pleasant Valley (1955)
Captain Rebel (1955)
Fair Oaks (1957)
The Serpent and The Staff (1958)
Jarrett's Jade (1959)
Gillian (1960)
The Garfield Honor (1961)
Griffin's Way (1962)
The Old Gods Laugh (1964)
An Odor of Sanctity (1965)
Goat Song (1967)
Judas, My Brother (1968)
Speak Now (1969)
The Dahomean (1971, later published as The Man from Dahomey)
The Girl From Storeyville (1972)
The Voyage Unplanned (1974)
Tobias and the Angel (1975)
A Rose for Ana Maria (1976)
Hail the Conquering Hero (1977)
A Darkness at Ingraham's Crest (1979)
Western: A Saga of the Great Plains (1982)
Devilseed (1984)
McKenzie's Hundred (1985)

I'm certain that the song that Reba McIntyre does called "Fancy" was written after someone read "A Woman Called Fancy."

Donna in Southern Maryland



JoAnn/QuAppelle | 1608 comments Mod
I do remember Frank Yerby, Donna. I remember my mother reading his books, getting them mostly from the library. He was pretty prolific, wasn't he?


Schmerguls | 215 comments So what is his best one? The only one I remember hearing about is The Foxes of Harrow. I never read any thing by him, but would willing read one, preferably the best one he ever wrote, if I knew what that was.


JoAnn/QuAppelle | 1608 comments Mod
Schmerguls wrote: "So what is his best one? The only one I remember hearing about is The Foxes of Harrow. I never read any thing by him, but would willing read one, preferably the best one he ever wrote, if I knew ..."

I cannot remember which one my mother liked best, and I never read any of his. Here is a link to a site that summarizes each book if that is any help:

http://www.frankyerby.com/view.html




Donna in Southern Maryland (Cedarville922) | 133 comments Mod
It's been 35 to 40 years since I read most of them, so I really can't remember. The one story line I do remember is A Woman Called Fancy. But not knowing your preferences, I hesitate to reccommend it. JoAnn's link should help.

Donna in Southern Maryland


Schmerguls | 215 comments The only ones I find in libraries I have access to are;




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4 titles matched: Yerby, Frank, 1916-1991.
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1. A darkness at Ingraham's Crest : a tale of the slaveholding South / Frank Yerby. *

by Yerby, Frank, 1916-1991-
New York : Dial Press, 1979. 1979.


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Location Collection Call No. Status Due Date
Aalfs (Main) Library Fiction Yer In





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2. The girl from Storyville : a Victorian novel / Frank Yerby. *

by Yerby, Frank, 1916-1991-
New York, Dial Press, 1972. 1972.


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Aalfs (Main) Library Fiction Yer In





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3. A rose for Ana Maria : a novel / by Frank Yerby. *

by Yerby, Frank, 1916-1991-
New York : Dial Press, 1976. 1976.


Requests: 0

Location Collection Call No. Status Due Date
Aalfs (Main) Library Fiction Yer In





--------------------------------------------------------------------------------
4. Western : a saga of the Great Plains / by Frank Yerby.

by Yerby, Frank, 1916-1991-
New York : Dial Press, 1982. 1982.


Requests: 0

Location Collection Call No. Status Due Date
Morningside Branch Western Section Yer In





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Alias Reader (AliasReader) By Craig Wilson, USA TODAY

The literary world lost a number of notable authors in 2009, from novelist John Updike to memoirist Frank McCourt.

John Mortimer, 85, on Jan. 16, in Oxfordshire, England

Bio: A barrister himself, Mortimer was a prolific writer and dramatist and best known for creating the cunning barrister Horace Rumpole, who defended those accused of crime in London's Old Bailey.

Quote: "The only rule I have found to have any validity in writing is not to bore yourself."

John Updike, 76, on Jan. 27, in Danvers, Mass.

Bio: The Pulitzer Prize-winning author of more than 20 novels and a dozen short story collections, he was best known for his Rabbit series which dealt with the world of the American Protestant middle class.

Quote: "Writers may be disreputable, incorrigible, early to decay or late to bloom, but they dare to go it alone."

Frank McCourt, 78, on July 19, in New York City

Bio: The Irish-American New York City English teacher turned his grim childhood in Limerick, Ireland, into the Pulitzer Prize-winning, best-selling memoir Angela's Ashes. He followed up with 'Tis and Teacher Man.

Quote: "When I look back on my childhood I wonder how I survived at all. It was, of course, a miserable childhood: the happy childhood is hardly worth your while. Worse than the ordinary miserable childhood is the miserable Irish childhood, and worse yet is the miserable Irish Catholic childhood."

E. Lynn Harris, 54, on July 23, in Los Angeles

Bio: A best-selling and openly gay author, he was famous for depicting African-American men who were on the down low and closeted. His work included the memoir What Becomes of the Brokenhearted and the novels A Love of My Own, Just as I Am and Any Way the Wind Blows.

Quote: "For me, my 20s and early 30s were spent just hiding and running, because there was no one to tell me that my life had value and the way I felt was OK."

Dominick Dunne, 83, on Aug. 26, in Manhattan

Bio: A journalist and novelist, Dunne was best known for his reports on the rich and famous. Author of The Two Mrs. Grenvilles and People Like Us and, posthumously, Too Much Money, he also reported for Vanity Fair magazine, notably on the O. J. Simpson trial.

Quote: "I had never attended a trial until my daughter's murder trial. What I witnessed in that courtroom enraged and redirected me."

http://www.usatoday.com/life/books/ne...


kate/Edukate12 | 42 comments I remember Frank yerby and I know I've read whatever my mother had that he'd written. Don't remember anything specific though.

kate


JoAnn/QuAppelle | 1608 comments Mod
Kate, the name Frank Yerby always brings my mother to mind...she loved his books.


Sandi (sandin954) | 211 comments >>John Mortimer, 85, on Jan. 16, in Oxfordshire, England

Bio: A barrister himself, Mortimer was a prolific writer and dramatist and best known for creating the cunning barrister Horace Rumpole, who defended those accused of crime in London's Old Bailey.<<

John Mortimer is one of my favorites. I always enjoy a visit with Rumpole and the gang (luckily I have many more books in the series to read). I also read his memoir Clinging to the Wreckage which was interesting.

The crime fiction world also lost Stuart M. Kaminsky in 2009 and Donald E. Westlake on December 31, 2008. Both were Mystery Writers of America Grandmasters and among my favorite writers of all time.


Bunny | 254 comments Sandi wrote: ">>John Mortimer, 85, on Jan. 16, in Oxfordshire, England

Bio: A barrister himself, Mortimer was a prolific writer and dramatist and best known for creating the cunning barrister Horace Rumpole, w..."



John Mortimer was one of my very favorites. I think I've read everything he wrote, darn it!



Sarah (SarahReader) Bunny wrote: "Sandi wrote: ">>John Mortimer, 85, on Jan. 16, in Oxfordshire, England

Bio: A barrister himself, Mortimer was a prolific writer and dramatist and best known for creating the cunning barrister H..."
Sandi: I think I've read everything he wrote, darn it!


And I KNOW I've listened to all the audio versions available!




Schmerguls | 215 comments On Jan 11 Miep Gies died. I read her book and my comment on it was as follows:

2205 Anne Frank Remembered: The Story of the Woman Who Helped to Hide the Frank Family, by Miep Gies with Alison Leslie Gold (read 10 Apr 1989) This book is searing in its simple tale. It tells of many things the diary didn't--what happened on Aug 4, 1944, and the awful time the author and her husband had thereafter--the Netherlands were not liberated till May of 1945. I found this book extremely absorbing and tear-inducing. It is a great complement to the diary and I am glad I read it.



JoAnn/QuAppelle | 1608 comments Mod
Schmerguls wrote: "On Jan 11 Miep Gies died. ."

This article has links to tributes.....

http://weblogs.baltimoresun.com/enter...


Richiesheff (DebATL) | 105 comments Donna in Southern Maryland wrote: "Does anyone remember Frank Yerby ? This thread made me look him up on Wiki:

Frank Garvin Yerby (September 5, 1916(1916-09-05) – November 29, 1991) was an African American historic..."



I remember my mom reading his books. She was a member of Doubleday back in the late 50's early 60's.



JoAnn/QuAppelle | 1608 comments Mod
Isn't it funny how Yerby appealed to our moms? Several of my friends remember the same thing.....


Catamorandi (wwwgoodreadscomprofilerandi) | 28 comments Sandi, I loved Donald E. Westlake. He wrote great crime fiction in a very humorous way. I really miss him.


message 20: by R. (new)

R. Honey | 141 comments Schmerguls: I was proud to see that The Philadelphia Inquirer put the news of Meip Gies's death on the front page. Like many boomers,her story was my first exposure to the Holacaust.
I put the article inside my copy of Anne Frank Remembered.


Sandi (sandin954) | 211 comments >>Sandi, I loved Donald E. Westlake . He wrote great crime fiction in a very humorous way. I really miss him.<<

Totally agree. Which books were your favorites? I've read all the Dortmunder books but have not really scratched the surface of his other work.



Catamorandi (wwwgoodreadscomprofilerandi) | 28 comments Sandi, I have only read Dortmunder books also. I would like to see what his other books are like.


Sandi (sandin954) | 211 comments >>Sandi, I have only read Dortmunder books also. I would like to see what his other books are like.<<

My favorites of his standalones so far are The Ax and The Hook. They are both much darker than the Dortmunder books though.


Carolyn (in SC) C234D | 123 comments JoAnn/QuAppelle wrote: "Robert B. Parker died yesterday

http://artsbeat.blogs.nytimes.com/201...

http://bookchase.blogspot.com/2010/01..."


What a shock! I haven't seen anything about this. I'm sorry to hear it, I particularly enjoyed the Spenser books.




Schmerguls | 215 comments Of Robert B. Parker's many books I have only read:

3038 The Godwulf Manuscript, by Robert B. Parker (read 28 Nov 1997) This is Parker's first book. He is a student of Dashiell Hammett and Raymond Chandler--his book is designed to be of the same kind. The hard-boiled detective, Spenser, is hired to check into the theft of a manuscript and there is quickly a murder, and then another, and Spenser kills three people who try to kill him. There is a grotesque and unnecessary day when Spenser has sex with both a mother and daughter--I thought those episodes were stupid and added nothing to the story. The action is fast-paced, violent, and Spenser is a tough cookie. I can't say I did not find the book easy and enjoyable to read, though I'm not sure I will read more by Parker. [And I never have, so far.:]



JoAnn/QuAppelle | 1608 comments Mod
This is sad and sweet at the same time. I had no idea that Erich Segal was such a classical scholar. I was shocked when I read what Wm. Styron, the other judges for the National Book Award, and Philip Roth said about/to him:

Love Story author Erich Segal dies at 72
http://www.washingtonpost.com/wp-dyn/...



JoAnn/QuAppelle | 1608 comments Mod
Remembering Robert Parker and Erich Segal (NPR recording):

http://www.npr.org/templates/story/st...



Bunny | 254 comments JoAnn/QuAppelle wrote: "Remembering Robert Parker and Erich Segal (NPR recording):

http://www.npr.org/templates/story/st...
"

I've read a lot of Parker's books, and, unlike Schmerguls experience with his first book, later books were amusing without being sex laden. Always amusing and that was nice.

I do remember sobbing through at least half of Love Story - ummmm. I might do the same thing today if I saw it again. Dumb story that absorbed me from start to finish. Segal got something right.



JoAnn/QuAppelle | 1608 comments Mod
Although I was no fan of Girl with Dragon Tattoo (abandoned it twice before abandoning it altogether) I know lots of people here liked his book(s), so thought you might be interested in this juicy story:

Battle Over Author's Estate Is a Real Thriller

http://www.aolnews.com/world/article/...


madrano | 444 comments I haven't read the books (yet) but this personal story will be fascinating to watch. I suspect the truth is somewhere in the middle, as far as the estrangement goes. If it's only felt on one side, the other party might not realize that there has been a dramatic reduction of visits &/or communication. I've seen it happen.

Regardless, i appreciate learning about the story. Thanks.

deborah


Richiesheff (DebATL) | 105 comments I just saw where J.D. Salinger died too.


Alias Reader (AliasReader) January 29, 2010

J. D. Salinger, Enigmatic Author, Dies at 91

By CHARLES McGRATH

J. D. Salinger, who was thought at one time to be the most important American writer to emerge since World War II but who then turned his back on success and adulation, becoming the Garbo of letters, famous for not wanting to be famous, died Wednesday at his home in Cornish, N.H., where he had lived in seclusion for more than 50 years. He was 91.

Mr. Salinger’s literary representative, Harold Ober Associates, announced the death, saying it was of natural causes. “Despite having broken his hip in May,” the agency said, “his health had been excellent until a rather sudden decline after the new year. He was not in any pain before or at the time of his death.”

Mr. Salinger’s literary reputation rests on a slender but enormously influential body of published work: the novel “The Catcher in the Rye,” the collection “Nine Stories” and two compilations, each with two long stories about the fictional Glass family: “Franny and Zooey” and “Raise High the Roof Beam, Carpenters and Seymour: An Introduction.”

“Catcher” was published in 1951, and its very first sentence, distantly echoing Mark Twain, struck a brash new note in American literature: “If you really want to hear about it, the first thing you’ll probably want to know is where I was born and what my lousy childhood was like, and how my parents were occupied and all before they had me, and all that David Copperfield kind of crap, but I don’t feel like going into it, if you want to know the truth.”


Link for full article

http://www.nytimes.com/2010/01/29/boo...

The Catcher in the Rye by J.D. Salinger The Catcher in the Rye
J.D. Salinger J.D. Salinger


Alias Reader (AliasReader) Activist, historian Howard Zinn dies at 87
Ros Krasny
BOSTON
Thu Jan 28, 2010 12:41pm ESTBOSTON (Reuters) - Historian and activist Howard Zinn, whose 1980 book "A People's History of the United States" was a rallying cry for the American left in a conservative era, has died aged 87.
link for full article:
http://www.reuters.com/article/idUSTR...

A People's History of the United States  1492 to Present (P.S.) by Howard Zinn A People's History of the United States: 1492 to Present
Howard Zinn Howard Zinn


Sherry (sethurner) (sthurner) Now we can talk about Salinger, too.


JoAnn/QuAppelle | 1608 comments Mod
Sherry (sethurner) wrote: "Now we can talk about Salinger, too. "

He may have been a great writer but he liked young girls way too much for comfort.



Schmerguls | 215 comments What I have read by Salinger:

648 The Catcher in the Rye, by J. D. Salinger (read __ Apr 1961)
3620 Raise High the Roof Beam, Carpenters and Seymour An Introduction, by J.D. Salinger (read 22 Aug 2002)
My comment on the latter:

3620. Raise High the Roof Beam, Carpenters (and) Seymour An Introduction, by J. D. Salinger (22 Aug 2002) Since I have never read any Salinger but The Catcher in the Rye (Apr 1961) I thought I'd read these two stories. Raise High is funny and elegantly written and enjoyable. Seymour I am sure has significance but seemed pointless to me, except as it may be autobiographically-tinged.

As to Catcher, that was read in the benighted days when I failed to do a post-reading note on what I read, so any comment on it wouold be affected by the almost 50 years which have passed since I read it.


Schmerguls | 215 comments Louis Auchincloss died on Jan 26. I read by him:
1885 The Indifferent Children, by Louis Auchincloss (read 25 Nov 1984)
1886 A Law for the Lion, by Louis Auchincloss (read 26 Nov 1984)
My comments:
1885 The Indifferent Children, by Louis Auchincloss (read 25 Nov 1984) This is the author's first novel, a 1947 effort he published under the name of Andrew Lee and which was republished, under his own name, in 1964. The protagonist, Beverly Stregelinus, is a New York socialite who goes into the Navy after Pearl Harbor and is sent to Panama. There he is attracted to Audrey Emerson, but gets engaged in Miami to Sylvia Tremaine. The book is readable, but it is surely not the work of a good writer--it has jumps and roughnesses, and really is gawkish. But it read all right, and one did not despise Stregelinus, even though he was an impossible character--in other words, in the court-martial examination proceeding he did not act in a way that the character he'd been drawn as could have acted. It is a creaky contrived novel.

1886 A Law for the Lion, by Louis Auchincloss (read 26 Nov 1984) This is a 1953 novel. It is a story about a staid and stuffy New York lawyer whose wife starts to commit adultery. This is in the days when it was the only ground for divorce in New York. The novel is slanted against principled morals, and the husband who is against his wife's action is held up as a 19th century bigot. Drinking and being immoral is held out as commendable, and one cannot help but be against the course George Dilworth pursues in his divorce. The courtroom scenes are not very realistic. The book is better put together, speaking of craftsmanship, than is The Indifferent Children, which is the only other Auchincloss novel I have read. But the book is not too well-written, even though it reminded me of some of Edith Wharton. But it was easy to read.




message 39: by R. (new)

R. Honey | 141 comments Of course I read Salinger in high school. As an adult I have read some fiction by Joyce Maynard and had always wanted to read that article she wrote at 18. Thanks for that link,Joann!
I was interested to read in today's Inquirer that Salinger attended Valley Forge Military Academy. In high school I kinda hung out there and went to some dances there.....up the road a piece from where I grew up!


JoAnn/QuAppelle | 1608 comments Mod
R. wrote: "Of course I read Salinger in high school. As an adult I have read some fiction by Joyce Maynard and had always wanted to read that article she wrote at 18. Thanks for that link,Joann!
.."


That would be Alias who posted the link!


Alias Reader (AliasReader) Schmerguls wrote: "Louis Auchincloss died on Jan 26. "
------------------

The Rector of Justin: A Novel- I read this a long time ago. I remember thinking the writing and the story were quite good.

I also read a short bio he did.Theodore Roosevelt: I didn't care for it. He managed to make an interesting subject quite dry.

I still have one of his books on my TBR. I purchased it not too long ago from a used book store. I purchased it based on my experience reading The Rector of Justin.

The Embezzler by Louis Auchincloss

I see from the Washington Post article The Embezzler and Justin were his two most famous novel.

http://www.washingtonpost.com/wp-dyn/...


message 42: by Schmerguls (last edited Feb 12, 2010 09:14AM) (new)

Schmerguls | 215 comments I thought this list from Wikipedia was interesting and was surprised that I had read four (nos. 3, 9, 11, and 13--but fear my reading of no. 13 was of an abridged book, and am not sure if I my reading of no. 9 included all of the work--but of at least 3 and 11 I am sure) of the books on the list:

Contents [hide:]
1 Longest novels in Latin or Cyrillic alphabets
1.1 Madeleine and Georges de Scudéry, Artamène
1.2 Jules Romains, Les Hommes de Bonne Volonté
1.3 Marcel Proust, À la recherche du temps perdu
1.4 Madison Cooper, Sironia, Texas
1.5 Samuel Richardson, Clarissa
1.6 Xavier Herbert, Poor Fellow My Country
1.7 Marguerite Young, Miss MacIntosh, My Darling
1.8 Ayn Rand, Atlas Shrugged
1.9 Alexandre Dumas, père, Le Vicomte de Bragelonne, ou Dix ans plus tard
1.10 Vikram Seth, A Suitable Boy
1.11 Leo Tolstoy, War and Peace
1.12 Carl Sandburg, Remembrance Rock
1.13 Victor Hugo, Les Misérables
1.14 Marija Jurić Zagorka, Gordana
1.15 Robert Musil, The Man Without Qua



JoAnn/QuAppelle | 1608 comments Mod
Schmerguls wrote: "I thought this list from Wikipedia was interesting and was surprised that I had read four (nos. 3, 9, 11, and 13--but fear my reading of no. 13 was of an abridged book, and am not sure if I my read..."

Schmerguls, I am surprised that you never read Atlas Shrugged. Have you read anything by Ayn Rand?


message 44: by Schmerguls (last edited Feb 12, 2010 09:13AM) (new)

Schmerguls | 215 comments Yes: The Fountainhead, by Ayn Rand (read 15 June 1951)

My reaction to that explains to me why I have not read Atlas Shrugged.


Sandi (sandin954) | 211 comments Former champion jockey and Mystery Grand Master Dick Francis has passed away. He was another one of my favorites and was among the first adult mystery writers I ever read (I first found his work in some old Reader's Digest Condensed Books that my Father brought home from an estate sale).

Here is a link to a website that is compiling all the tributes and obituaries: http://www.sarahweinman.com/confessio...


Schmerguls | 215 comments Dick Fraancis died today. Here is what I have read by him:

2832 Decider, by Dick Francis (read 5 Feb 1996)
4133 Field of Thirteen, by Dick Francis (read 24 Feb 2006)
4134 Second Wind, by Dick Francis (read 25 Feb 2006)
My comment on each:

2832 Decider, by Dick Francis (read 5 Feb 1996) Till a friend said I should read something by Dick Francis I had never heard of him. So I was astounded to find our public library had 87 items by him! I found this book memorable for this riddle: There is a fork in the road --one leads to safety, the other to death. Identical twins are at the fork. One always tells the truth. The other always lies. I can ask only one question. What question should I ask? If you can't figure it out, you can read the book for the answer. The story is of Lee Morris, who has six sons, and comes in contact with the Stratton family, which owns a racetrack. There is lots of violence and irrational behavior by various Strattons, and Lee Morris is very smart, as are his sons, and all comes out well in the end. I thought the writing unsubtle, shallow, and not always exciting. But there is a riproaring finish.

4133 Field of Thirteen, by Dick Francis (read 24 Feb 2006) This is a book of 13 short stories. All are very readable, and none are objectionable. Some are better than others, but none is a failure, tho English racing jargon was not always perfectly comprehensible to me.

4134 Second Wind, by Dick Francis (read 25 Feb 2006) This is told in the first person by a fictional BBC weatherman, who flies thru the eye of a hurricane to one of the Cayman Islands. Lots of suspense, and improbable adventure.



message 47: by R. (new)

R. Honey | 141 comments Not a good year for well known authors!


Sherry (sethurner) (sthurner) Back in the 1970s I read a handful of Francis mysteries. Like you, I enjoyed them, but I can't remember the plots of any of them today.


Alias Reader (AliasReader) Elizabeth L. Post (May 7, 1920 – April 24, 2010),

Elizabeth Post, etiquette expert, dies at 89

NAPLES, Fla. (AP)

— Elizabeth Post, who wrote more than a dozen books on etiquette and was spokeswoman for the Emily Post Institute in Vermont, has died.

Post's daughter-in-law, Peggy Post, says the the 89-year-old died on Saturday in Naples, Fla.

Elizabeth Post became the spokeswoman for the Emily Post Institute in 1965 and for decades, wrote a column on manners and etiquette for Good Housekeeping magazine.

She was the granddaughter-in-law of the country's foremost etiquette expert, Emily Post.

Elizabeth Post revised the manual Emily Post's Etiquette five times, helping keep it current as social norms have changed since its original printing in 1922.

Wiki: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Elizabet...


Steffi I read Pride's Castle. First of all, I was interested in Yerby'S description of New York. I liked the book, but sometimes it was a litte bit sesquipedalian.


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