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MILITARY - IRAQ/AFGHANISTAN > WAR IN AFGHANISTAN




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message 460: by Bryan, Assisting Moderator - Presidential Series (new)

Bryan Craig | 11257 comments Great, I will have to add some more stuff on TBR pile. Thank you.


message 459: by André (last edited Oct 26, 2014 11:34AM) (new)

André (AndrH) | 2421 comments Fire and Forget  Short Stories from the Long War by Colum McCann Foreword by Colum McCannColum McCann

Roy Scranton,Ted Janis, Gavin Ford Kovite, Perry O'Brien, Roman Skaskiw, Jacob Siegel, Andrew Slater, Mariette Kalinowski, Brian Van Reet - no photographs
Phil KlayPhil Klay, Siobhan FallonSiobhan Fallon Colby BuzzellColby Buzzell Matt GallagherMatt Gallagher, Brian TurnerBrian Turner

You're so right, Ryan. Unforgettable short stories by the ones who were there - or waited for them to return home.
A must read.


message 458: by Ryan (new)

Ryan Goodrich | 7 comments Bryan wrote: "Ryan, have you found some books on the topic that you enjoyed?"

Fire and Forget: Short Stories from the Long War

Why, yes, I have! Fire and Forget immediately comes to mind. I know it's not a non-fiction book, but it captures the warrior mindset and military life quite well. And all with short stories! Little snippets into the life and times of various military members who have all 'been there, done that' of which I think everyone here could appreciate.


message 457: by Bryan, Assisting Moderator - Presidential Series (new)

Bryan Craig | 11257 comments Ryan, have you found some books on the topic that you enjoyed?


message 456: by Ryan (last edited Oct 24, 2014 10:02AM) (new)

Ryan Goodrich | 7 comments Bryan wrote: "Thanks for your input, Ryan. People do need to examine the author before picking up a book."

Your welcome, Bryan. I know some may not agree, but that's why we're here, right? To get each other's opinions and make decisions on what to read?


message 455: by Bryan, Assisting Moderator - Presidential Series (new)

Bryan Craig | 11257 comments Thanks for your input, Ryan. People do need to examine the author before picking up a book.


message 454: by Ryan (new)

Ryan Goodrich | 7 comments André wrote: "Ryan wrote: "To anyone who decides..."

Nice review, Ryan. I thought the book was o.k. keeping in mind the writer's narrow perspective. I never understood all the raving reviews it got, though remi..."



Thanks, Andre. I just have a problem with a lot of people who read books like Ms. Gall's and take it for granted. People are so quick to believe what they hear in the media and never realize that there is much more to the story than what a biased, prize-seeking, journalist tells the world is 'truth'. I'm not saying I have all the answers, but I'm smart enough and experienced enough to know bad journalism and unwarranted bashing when I see it.


message 453: by André (last edited Oct 24, 2014 09:34AM) (new)

André (AndrH) | 2421 comments Ryan wrote: "To anyone who decides..."
The Wrong Enemy  America in Afghanistan, 2001-2014 by Carlotta Gall by Carlotta Gall - no photo

Nice review, Ryan. I thought the book was o.k. keeping in mind the writer's narrow perspective. I never understood all the raving reviews it got, though reminding myself the reviews were mostly written by yet more journalists I should've known better...
There definitely are better books out there, that's for sure.


message 452: by Ryan (last edited Oct 24, 2014 09:00AM) (new)

Ryan Goodrich | 7 comments "The Wrong Enemy: America in Afghanistan, 2001-2014

The Wrong Enemy  America in Afghanistan, 2001-2014 by Carlotta Gall by Carlotta Gall (no photo)

To anyone who decides, willingly, to read such a convoluted book by a journalist with a highly biased opinion and narrow perspective (she admits it herself), take it from someone who's been there and served during much of the same time period: Ms. Gall is in no place to say, "against an enemy they barely understood, and could not truly engage." I'm sorry, but, even with my admitted problems I have with the military at times, I would still never be so quick to say they've (the U.S. military) had their heads in the dirt for more than a decade (actually much, much longer than that-she needs to research our presence over there better)and haven't a clue about a war/s they learned to fight very well actually.

Read this book if you must, but understand who's writing it, where the information is coming from, and remember how the media loves to paint pictures which are highly one-sided and promote self-serving agendas. Really? You feel bad for an enemy that has no problem sending their own women and children, with dynamite strapped to their chests, to blow up others who are trying to give them their rights and a chance at life with equality? We are talking about a culture that values death more than life and believes women and children are expendable.

I don't always agree with the military (Marines) of which I served for almost a decade, but anyone who believes a journalist, who's never served in the government or military, over highly trained individuals who have interacted and fought against such an unpredictable enemy for so long, has to be outside of their mind and needs to do quite a bit more research than what Ms. Gall has whipped up here: not much more than smoke, fluff, and conspiracy theory. Sorry.


message 451: by André (last edited Oct 24, 2014 02:03AM) (new)

André (AndrH) | 2421 comments Level Zero Heroes  The Story of U.S. Marine Special Operations in Bala Murghab, Afghanistan by Michael Golembesky by Michael GolembeskyMichael Golembesky

An amazing book. Staff Sergeant Michael Golembesky - who served as a JTAC with the Marine Special Operations Team 8222 - tells the true story about their assignment to conduct special operations to end the Taliban's grip on an isolated valley.
The HC edition has links to a website with special content.
A must read!


message 450: by Jerome (new)

Jerome | 2700 comments That was a good one, Bryan, I would definitely recommend it.


message 449: by Bryan, Assisting Moderator - Presidential Series (new)

Bryan Craig | 11257 comments The Wrong Enemy: America in Afghanistan, 2001-2014

The Wrong Enemy  America in Afghanistan, 2001-2014 by Carlotta Gall by Carlotta Gall (no photo)

Synopsis:

Carlotta Gall has reported from Afghanistan and Pakistan for almost the entire duration of the American invasion and occupation, beginning shortly after 9/11. She knows just how much this war has cost the Afghan people, and how much damage can be traced to Pakistan and its duplicitous government and intelligence forces. Now that American troops are withdrawing, it is time to tell the full history of how we have been fighting the wrong enemy, in the wrong country.

Gall combines searing personal accounts of battles and betrayals with moving portraits of the ordinary Afghanis who endured a terrible war of more than a decade. Her firsthand accounts of Taliban warlords, Pakistani intelligence thugs, American generals, Afghani politicians, and the many innocents who were caught up in this long war are riveting. Her evidence that Pakistan fueled the Taliban and protected Osama bin Laden is revelatory. This is a sweeping account of a war brought by well-intentioned American leaders against an enemy they barely understood, and could not truly engage.


message 448: by Bentley, Group Founder, Leader, Chief (new)

Bentley | 27577 comments Thank you Andre


message 447: by André (new)

André (AndrH) | 2421 comments Wounded Vets Return to Afghanistan to Find Closure

http://www.washingtonpost.com/world/a...


message 446: by Jerome (new)

Jerome | 2700 comments An upcoming release:
Release date: November 11, 2014

The Good War: Why We Couldn't Win the War or the Peace in Afghanistan

The Good War  Why We Couldn�t Win the War or the Peace in Afghanistan by Jack Fairweather by Jack Fairweather (no photo)

Synopsis:

In its earliest days, the American-led war in Afghanistan appeared to be a triumph—a “good war” in comparison to the debacle in Iraq. Thirteen years later, it has turned into the longest conflict in US history, one even more unpopular than the Vietnam War. Now, as we slouch toward withdrawal from Afghanistan, the time is right for a full accounting of what went wrong.

In The Good War, acclaimed war correspondent Jack Fairweather provides the first full narrative history of the war in Afghanistan. Drawing on interviews with key leaders and extensive on-the-ground reporting, Fairweather debunks the long-held notion that Afghanistan could have been won with troop surges and nation-building programs, and shows that only by accepting the limitations in Afghanistan—from the presence of the Taliban to the ubiquity of poppy production to the country’s inherent unsuitability for a Western model of government—can America help to restore peace in this shattered land.


message 445: by Bryan, Assisting Moderator - Presidential Series (new)

Bryan Craig | 11257 comments Thanks, Michael, don't forget to add a citation.

Flags and Tears
Note:
Historical Fiction

(no image) Flags and Tears by Michael P. Ventura (no photo)

Synopsis:

Flags and Tears is a historical fiction of England’s first invasion of Afghanistan. The story has a timeline and close relationship to many of the events and people actually involved. See how politics and individuals bring countries to war. Experience the human drama of war. Learn about the cultures, religions, and life in 19th century India and Afghanistan. Feel the central character’s gain and loss of love. Know the thoughts of Rulers, spies, soldiers, travelers, and women of the time.


message 444: by Michael (new)

Michael Ventelli | 1 comments There is a new novel out on Amazon/books titled Flags and Tears. The story is a historical fiction about England's first invasion of the mountainous Afghanistan. The saga historically follows the timeline of events. Many of the characters are based on those actually involved. The epic has never been told in novel form.

The political intrigue in the overthrow of the Afghan Emir is one layer of the plot; along with a war time love story. A diverse cast of players, including world leaders, spies, a smuggler, a kidnapped wife, a priestess, beautiful women and soldiers, are woven into the cultural, religious tapestry of Afghanistan and India during England's 19th century rule.

Marvel at how history repeats at different times and places.


message 443: by Jerome (new)

Jerome | 2700 comments An upcoming history:
Release date: April 8, 2014

The Wrong Enemy: America in Afghanistan, 2001-2014

The Wrong Enemy  America in Afghanistan, 2001-2014 by Carlotta Gall by Carlotta Gall (no photo)

Synopsis:

Carlotta Gall has reported from Afghanistan and Pakistan for almost the entire duration of the American invasion and occupation, beginning shortly after 9/11. She knows just how much this war has cost the Afghan people, and how much damage can be traced to Pakistan and its duplicitous government and intelligence forces. Now that American troops are withdrawing, it is time to tell the full history of how we have been fighting the wrong enemy, in the wrong country.

Gall combines searing personal accounts of battles and betrayals with moving portraits of the ordinary Afghanis who endured a terrible war of more than a decade. Her firsthand accounts of Taliban warlords, Pakistani intelligence thugs, American generals, Afghani politicians, and the many innocents who were caught up in this long war are riveting. Her evidence that Pakistan fueled the Taliban and protected Osama bin Laden is revelatory. This is a sweeping account of a war brought by well-intentioned American leaders against an enemy they barely understood, and could not truly engage.


message 442: by Bentley, Group Founder, Leader, Chief (new)

Bentley | 27577 comments The trees and all of that beautiful vegetation are completely gone along with so much of what they valued.


message 441: by Christopher (new)

Christopher | 1324 comments The photo I posted is often juxtaposed with a photo of the exact same scene today:

(Source: http://sadhillnews.com/2010/07/12/kab...)


Here are some more photos:

Once Upon a Time in Afghanistan

Source: http://www.foreignpolicy.com/articles...


message 440: by Bentley, Group Founder, Leader, Chief (new)

Bentley | 27577 comments This is what war does - look how beautiful those photos are - it is almost as if they were blown back to the stone age with the wars. These are beautiful, the place was beautiful and look at how the young women were dressed - they have gone backwards. And this was 40 years ago. It is almost as if the photos in terms of progress are reversed. Very sad. Thank you for sharing.


message 439: by Christopher (new)

Christopher | 1324 comments Had to share this:

Pictures of Afghanistan from the 1960's


For more visit:
http://blogs.denverpost.com/captured/...


message 438: by Bryan, Assisting Moderator - Presidential Series (new)

Bryan Craig | 11257 comments Thanks, Andre, interesting.


message 437: by André (new)

André (AndrH) | 2421 comments An interesting article (incl. video and gallery)in the Washington Post about the troubles the Afghan troops face trying to rescue their wounded when the US helicopters leave:

http://www.washingtonpost.com/world/a...


message 436: by Bentley, Group Founder, Leader, Chief (new)

Bentley | 27577 comments Thank you Jerome, good add.


message 435: by Bryan, Assisting Moderator - Presidential Series (new)

Bryan Craig | 11257 comments Thanks, Jerome.


message 434: by Jerome (new)

Jerome | 2700 comments Here's an upcoming book on one of Afghanistan's more infamous warlords. If you've read Horse Soldiers  The Extraordinary Story of a Band of US Soldiers Who Rode to Victory in Afghanistan  by Doug Stanton by Doug Stanton this might sound familiar:

The Last Warlord: The Life and Legend of Dostum, the Afghan Warrior Who Led US Special Forces to Topple the Taliban Regime

The Last Warlord  The Life and Legend of Dostum, the Afghan Warrior Who Led US Special Forces to Topple the Taliban Regime by Brian Glyn Williams by Brian Glyn Williams

Synopsis

In The Last Warlord, scholar Brian Glyn Williams takes Westerners inside the world of general Abdul Rashid Dostum, one of the most powerful of the Afghan warlords who have dominated the country since the Soviet invasion. Based on lengthy interviews with Dostum and his family and subcommanders, as well as local chieftains, mullahs, elders, Taliban enemies and prisoners of war, and women’s rights activists, The Last Warlord tells the story of Dostum’s rise to power from peasant villager to the man who fought a long and bitter war against the Taliban and Al Qaeda fanatics who sought to repress his people. The book details how, after 9/11, the CIA contacted the mysterious Mongol warrior to help US Special Forces wage a covert, horse-mounted war in the mountains of Afghanistan that ended in a stunning victory; how Dostum was later marginalized by US and Afghan leaders; and how sensational media accounts have made him the object of rampant mythologizing. With the United States drawing down troops in 2014 and Dostum poised to re-enter the world stage to fight a resurgent Taliban, The Last Warlord provides important historical context to the controversy swirling around Afghanistan’s warlord culture and is an essential contribution to the debate on Afghanistan’s future.


message 433: by Bentley, Group Founder, Leader, Chief (new)

Bentley | 27577 comments Thank you all for the adds.


message 432: by Mark (new)

Mark Mortensen Here is a first hand account written by a recipient of the Medal of Honor.

Into the Fire: A Firsthand Account of the Most Extraordinary Battle in the Afghan War

Into the Fire  A Firsthand Account of the Most Extraordinary Battle in the Afghan War by Dakota Meyer by Dakota Meyer

Synopsis

In the fall of 2009, Taliban insurgents ambushed a patrol of Afghan soldiers and Marine advisors in a mountain village called Ganjigal. Firing from entrenched positions, the enemy was positioned to wipe out one hundred men who were pinned down and were repeatedly refused artillery support. Ordered to remain behind with the vehicles, twenty-one year-old Marine corporal Dakota Meyer disobeyed orders and attacked to rescue his comrades.

With a brave driver at the wheel, Meyer stood in the gun turret exposed to withering fire, rallying Afghan troops to follow. Over the course of the five hours, he charged into the valley time and again. Employing a variety of machine guns, rifles, grenade launchers, and even a rock, Meyer repeatedly repulsed enemy attackers, carried wounded Afghan soldiers to safety, and provided cover for dozens of others to escape—supreme acts of valor and determination. In the end, Meyer and four stalwart comrades—an Army captain, an Afghan sergeant major, and two Marines—cleared the battlefield and came to grips with a tragedy they knew could have been avoided. For his actions on that day, Meyer became the first living Marine in three decades to be awarded the Medal of Honor.

Into the Fire tells the full story of the chaotic battle of Ganjigal for the first time, in a compelling, human way that reveals it as a microcosm of our recent wars. Meyer takes us from his upbringing on a farm in Kentucky, through his Marine and sniper training, onto the battlefield, and into the vexed aftermath of his harrowing exploits in a battle that has become the stuff of legend.

Investigations ensued, even as he was pitched back into battle alongside U.S. Army soldiers who embraced him as a fellow grunt. When it was over, he returned to the States to confront living with the loss of his closest friends. This is a tale of American values and upbringing, of stunning heroism, and of adjusting to loss and to civilian life.

We see it all through Meyer’s eyes, bullet by bullet, with raw honesty in telling of both the errors that resulted in tragedy and the resolve of American soldiers, U.S.Marines, and Afghan soldiers who’d been abandoned and faced certain death.

Meticulously researched and thrillingly told, with nonstop pace and vivid detail, Into the Fire is the true story of a modern American hero.


message 431: by Jerome (new)

Jerome | 2700 comments This isn't strictly related to Afghanistan, but it looks quite interesting and I'm sure I'm sure many will want to look into it. This comes out April 23rd:

Dirty Wars: The World Is A Battlefield

Dirty Wars  The World Is A Battlefield by Jeremy Scahill by Jeremy ScahillJeremy Scahill

Synopsis

In this groundbreaking book of new reportage, sure to stir a global debate, journalist Jeremy Scahill author of the acclaimed international best-seller "Blackwater" takes us into the heart of the War on Terror’s most dangerous battlefields as he chases down the most important foreign policy story of our time.

From Afghanistan and Pakistan to Yemen, Somalia and beyond, Scahill speaks to the CIA agents, mercenaries and elite Special Operations Forces operators who populate the dark side of American war-fighting. He goes deep into al Qaeda-held territory in Yemen and walks the streets of Mogadishu with CIA-backed warlords. We also meet the survivors of U.S. night raids and drone strikes including families of U.S. citizens targeted for assassination by their own government who reveal the human consequences of the dirty wars the United States struggles to keep hidden.

Written in a gripping, action-packed narrative non-fiction style, Dirty Wars: The World is a Battlefield reveals that, despite his pledge to bring accountability to U.S. wars and to end Bush-era abuses, President Barack Obama has kept in place many of the most dangerous and secret programs that thrived under his predecessor. In stunning detail, Scahill exposes how Obama has escalated these secret U.S. wars and has built up an elite secret U.S. military unit that answers to no one but the president himself. Scahill reveals the existence of previously unreported secret prisons, kidnappings, assassinations, and cover-ups of covert operations gone terribly wrong.

In this remarkable story from the frontlines of the undeclared battlefields of the War on Terror, journalist Jeremy Scahill documents the new paradigm of American war: fought far from any declared battlefield, by units that do not officially exist, in thousands of operations a month that are never publicly acknowledged.

The devastating picture that emerges in Dirty Wars is of a secret U.S. killing machine that has grown more powerful than whatever president happens to reside in the White House. Scahill argues that far from keeping the United States and the world safe from terrorism, these covert American wars ensure that the terror will grow and spread.


message 430: by Bryan, Assisting Moderator - Presidential Series (new)

Bryan Craig | 11257 comments Thanks, Jerome.


message 429: by Jerome (new)

Jerome | 2700 comments This came out last October:

From Kabul to Baghdad and Back: The U.S. at War in Afghanistan and Iraq

From Kabul to Baghdad and Back  The U.S. at War in Afghanistan and Iraq by John R. Ballard by John R. Ballard

Synopsis

From Kabul to Baghdad and Back provides insight into the key strategic decisions of the Afghan and Iraq campaigns as the United States attempted to wage both simultaneously against al-Qaeda and its supporting affiliates. It also evaluates the strategic execution of those military campaigns to identify how well the two operations were conducted in light of their political objectives. The book identifies the elements that made the 2001 military operation to oust the Taliban successful, then with combat operations in Iraq as a standard of comparison, the authors analyze the remainder of the Afghan campaign and the essential problems that plagued that effort, from the decision to go to war with Iraq in 2002, through the ill-fated transition to NATO lead in Afghanistan in 2006, the dismissal of Generals McKiernan and McChrystal, the eventual decision by President Obama to make the Afghan campaign the main effort in the war on extremism, and the final development of drawdown plans following the end of the war in Iraq. No other book successfully compares and contrasts the campaigns in Iraq and Afghanistan from a national strategic perspective, analyzing the impact of fighting the Iraq War on the success of the United States campaign in Afghanistan. It is also the first book to specifically question several key operational decisions in Afghanistan including: the decision to give NATO the lead in Afghanistan, the decisions to fire Generals McKiernan and McChrystal and the decision to conduct an Iraq War-style surge in Afghanistan. It also compares the Afghan campaigns fought by the Soviet Union and the United States, the counterinsurgency campaigns styles in Iraq and Afghanistan and the leadership of senior American officials in both Iraq and Afghanistan. In the final chapter, the key lessons of the two campaigns are outlined, including the importance of effective strategic decision-making, the utility of population focused counterinsurgency practices, the challenges of building partner capacity during combat, and the mindset required to prosecute modern war.


message 428: by 'Aussie Rick' (new)

'Aussie Rick' (AussieRick) I've just started reading this new book on one aspect of the war in Afghanistan; The Outpost.


The Outpost  An Untold Story of American Valor by Jake Tapper by Jake TapperJake Tapper


message 427: by Jerome (new)

Jerome | 2700 comments Empires of Mud: War and Warlords in Afghanistan

Empires of Mud  War and Warlords in Afghanistan by Antonio Giustozzi by Antonio Giustozzi

Synopsis

Warlords are charismatic leaders who exploit weak authorities to gain control of subnational areas. Nevertheless, warlords do in fact participate in state formation, and this book considers the dynamics of warlordism within the context of such debates. Antonio Giustozzi begins with aspects of the Afghan environment that are conducive to the fragmentation of central authority and the emergence of warlords. He then accounts for the phenomenon from the 1980s to today, considering Afghanistan's two foremost warlords, Ismail Khan and Abdul Rashid Dostum, along with their political, economic, and military systems of rule.

Despite the intervention of Allied forces in 2001, both of these leaders continue to wield considerable power. Giustozzi studies the similarities and differences between their administrations and compares them against the ascendance of a third warlord, Ahmad Shah Massoud, who incorporates similar elements of rule. Giustozzi identifies prevalent themes in the emergence of warlordism, particularly the role of local military leaders and their gradual acquisition of "class consciousness." He then tracks the evolution of this strategy into a more sophisticated state-like, or political-party-like, structure.


message 426: by Jerome (new)

Jerome | 2700 comments Congress passed a joint resolution on Sept. 18, 2001 that was approved 420-1 in the House and 98-0 in the Senate that gave the president authority to use all "necessary and appropriate force" against those whom the president determined "planned, authorized, committed,or aided" the 9/11 attacks and those who "harbored" the terrorists.

Now, following the shock of 9/11, it's not surprising that there was only ONE dissenter (a Democrat from Berkely, Barbara Lee) to an act that would punish al-Qaeda. Also, it wasn't really about "punishing" al-Qaeda than it was preventing further attacks.

So,in my opinion, in all senses of the word, it was "legal" since it was open and the public knew about it and supported it, and since there was no backroom secret deals or manipulation to get the authorization passed, since, after 9/11, such underhanded measures were not necessary to convince America to retaliate.

See Terrorism, War And International Law: The Legality Of The Use Of Force Against Afghanistan In 2001 by Myra Williamson


message 425: by R.M.F (new)

R.M.F Brown | 86 comments Regarding Afghanistan, was war ever declared, and can you declare war on a non-nation state? I've been reading some of the legal issues surrounding the invasion of 2001, and I'm still puzzled. It's my understanding that because the Taliban weren't a recognised government you couldn't go down the usual route. In other words, it was a legal minefield.


message 424: by Jerome (new)

Jerome | 2700 comments It was excellent, Rick, highly recommended.


message 423: by Bryan, Assisting Moderator - Presidential Series (new)

Bryan Craig | 11257 comments I have used this book for work; it is helpful.

The Wars of Afghanistan  Messianic Terrorism, Tribal Conflicts, and the Failures of Great Powers by Peter TomsenPeter Tomsen


message 422: by 'Aussie Rick' (new)

'Aussie Rick' (AussieRick) Let us know how you go with that book Jerome, I have been eyeing it off for a while :)


message 421: by Jerome (new)

Jerome | 2700 comments I just started a rather hefty book that might interest some of you:

The Wars of Afghanistan: Messianic Terrorism, Tribal Conflicts, and the Failures of Great Powers

The Wars of Afghanistan  Messianic Terrorism, Tribal Conflicts, and the Failures of Great Powers by Peter Tomsen by Peter Tomsen

Synopsis

As Ambassador and Special Envoy on Afghanistan from 1989 to 1992, Peter Tomsen has had close relationships with Afghan leaders and has dealt with senior Taliban, warlords, and religious leaders involved in the region’s conflicts over the last two decades. Now Tomsen draws on a rich trove of never-before-published material to shed new light on the American involvement in the long and continuing Afghan war. This book offers a deeply informed perspective on how Afghanistan’s history as a "shatter zone” for foreign invaders and its tribal society have shaped the modern Afghan narrative. It brings to life the appallingly misinformed secret operations by foreign intelligence agencies, including the Soviet NKVD and KGB, the Pakistani ISI, and the CIA.

American policy makers, Tomsen argues, still do not understand Afghanistan; nor do they appreciate how the CIA’s covert operations and the Pentagon’s military strategy have strengthened extremism in the country. At this critical time, he shows how the U.S. and the coalition it leads can assist the region back to peace and stability.


message 420: by 'Aussie Rick' (new)

'Aussie Rick' (AussieRick) André wrote: "A very fine video-article on the Afghan Pepsi Bottle Boys:

http://www.nytimes.com/video/2012/10/..."


Another interesting news story :)


message 419: by 'Aussie Rick' (new)

'Aussie Rick' (AussieRick) André wrote: "A fine article (with photographs) in the Washington Post about a US Platoon during their final months of their mission in a combat outpost:
http://www.washingtonpost.com/nationa......"


Interesting article André, thanks for posting the link.


message 418: by André (last edited Oct 14, 2012 03:15AM) (new)

André (AndrH) | 2421 comments A very fine video-article on the Afghan Pepsi Bottle Boys:

http://www.nytimes.com/video/2012/10/...


message 417: by André (new)

André (AndrH) | 2421 comments A fine article (with photographs) in the Washington Post about a US Platoon during their final months of their mission in a combat outpost:
http://www.washingtonpost.com/nationa...


message 416: by Jerome (last edited Sep 16, 2012 05:26PM) (new)


message 415: by Bentley, Group Founder, Leader, Chief (new)

Bentley | 27577 comments Still some great books for you Jerome (smile)


message 414: by Jerome (new)

Jerome | 2700 comments Thank you so much, guys.
(I meant the 1800s wars, though :) )


message 413: by Mark (new)

Mark Mortensen A welcome quick and great response by all...


message 412: by Bryan, Assisting Moderator - Presidential Series (last edited Sep 05, 2012 06:20AM) (new)

Bryan Craig | 11257 comments Jerome, a couple more:

Dark Defile

The Dark Defile  Britain's Catastrophic Invasion of Afghanistan, 1838-1842 by Diana PrestonDiana Preston

Synopsis

Convinced in 1838 that Britain's invaluable empire in India was threatened by Russia, Persia, and Afghan tribes, the British government ordered its Army of the Indus into Afghanistan to oust from power the independent-minded king, Dost Mohammed, and install in Kabul the unpopular puppet ruler Shah Shuja. Expecting a quick campaign, the British found themselves trapped by unforeseen circumstances; eventually the tribes united and the seemingly omnipotent army was slaughtered in 1842 as it desperately retreated through the mountain passes from Kabul to Jalalabad. Only one Briton survived uncaptured. Diana Preston vividly recounts the drama of this First Afghan War, one of the opening salvos in the strategic rivalry between Britain and Russia for supremacy in Central Asia. As insightful about geography as she is about political and military miscalculation, Preston draws on rarely documented letters and diaries to bring alive long-lost characters-Lord Auckland, the weak British governor-general in India; his impetuous aide William Macnaghten; and the prescient adventurer-envoy Alexander Burnes, whose sage advice was steadfastly ignored. A model of compelling narrative history, The Dark Defile is a fascinating exploration of nineteenth-century geopolitics, and a cautionary tale that resonates loudly today.

The Great Game

The Great Game  The Struggle for Empire in Central Asia by Peter HopkirkPeter Hopkirk

Synopsis

Peter Hopkirk's spellbinding account of the great imperial struggle for supremacy in Central Asia has been hailed as essential reading with that era's legacy playing itself out today.

The Great Game between Victorian Britain and Tsarist Russia was fought across desolate terrain from the Caucasus to China, over the lonely passes of the Parmirs and Karakorams, in the blazing Kerman and Helmund deserts, and through the caravan towns of the old Silk Road-both powers scrambling to control access to the riches of India and the East. When play first began, the frontiers of Russia and British India lay 2000 miles apart; by the end, this distance had shrunk to twenty miles at some points. Now, in the vacuum left by the disintegration of the Soviet Union, there is once again talk of Russian soldiers "dipping their toes in the Indian Ocean."

The Washington Post has said that "every story Peter Hopkirk touches is totally engrossing." In this gripping narrative he recounts a breathtaking tale of espionage and treachery through the actual experiences of its colorful characters. Based on meticulous scholarship and on-the-spot research, this is the history at the core of today's geopolitics.


message 411: by André (new)

André (AndrH) | 2421 comments Jerome wrote: "Can anyone recommend any good books on the British wars in Afghanistan?"

Jerome, check the older posts, they're full of British books.

My Favorite:

Apache by Ed Macy by Ed Macy


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