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Word Games > weird and wonderful words

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Ruth | 10857 comments I got a 6 on this quiz. How do you do?

http://www.guardian.co.uk/books/quiz/...


message 2: by Debbie, sardonic princess of cheerfulness (new)

Debbie (Sardonicprincessofcheerfulness) | 6330 comments Hahahaha....I did it too and here is what it said!

"You scored 4 out of a possible 10

You jobbernowl [blockhead:]! But don't be too mumpish [depressed in spirits:] and try not to gowl [weep bitterly:] – just start studying your dictionary."



Savvy  (SavvySuzdolcefarniente) | 1450 comments Glad I was born in modern times....I scored 5 and most were a guess...

Here's what it said about me!

"You're not quite so much of a goostrumnoodle [fool:] as you might be, but you're still two ants short of a picnic. As the Aussies would say, the wheel is turning, but the hamster is dead."

Oh NO...the hamster!!!...Promise Joanie!!!...he's fine...just checked on him...I did!!!


Carol | 9307 comments I got a three. hahahahaha. You jobbernowl [blockhead:]! But don't be too mumpish [depressed in spirits:] and try not to gowl [weep bitterly:] – just start studying your dictionary." duh


Anna | 447 comments Disturbingly:

You scored 8 out of a possible 10

Froligozene! [Tudor-Stuart term meaning rejoice!:] But don't cachinnate [laugh loudly and immoderately:] or you'll be seen as a princock [conceited young man:] or a criss-miss [pretentious woman who overestimates her abilities:].


But I only thought I knew one. Am I good guesser or an untapped genius when it comes to language? Only time will tell.


message 6: by Newengland, Mad Mod (new)

Newengland | 12332 comments Untapped genius.


Anna | 447 comments Always knew I was genius. Now, how to get the rest of the world to see it....


Mikki (AussieTwins99) | 27 comments Gee wiz who said Brains is better than beauty?


message 9: by Debbie, sardonic princess of cheerfulness (new)

Debbie (Sardonicprincessofcheerfulness) | 6330 comments Dunno....but it is true!


message 10: by Newengland, Mad Mod (new)

Newengland | 12332 comments Go for baroque -- ask for both!


Carol | 9307 comments and if you can't get either ask for filthy lucre



message 12: by Newengland, Mad Mod (new)

Newengland | 12332 comments laundered first


Carol | 9307 comments PSIONICS


message 14: by Carol (last edited Nov 08, 2009 07:57PM) (new)

Carol | 9307 comments Psionics is the study and/or practice of using the mind to induce paranormal phenomena. Examples of this include telepathy, telekinesis, and other workings of the outside world through the psyche. The topic is widely discussed in fiction.


TheGirlBytheSeaofCortez (Madly77) Anna wrote: "Disturbingly:

You scored 8 out of a possible 10

Froligozene! [Tudor-Stuart term meaning rejoice!:] But don't cachinnate [laugh loudly and immoderately:] or you'll be seen as a princock [conce..."


You scored 6 out of a possible 10

You're not quite so much of a goostrumnoodle [fool:] as you might be, but you're still two ants short of a picnic. As the Aussies would say, the wheel is turning, but the hamster is dead.

I have to admit, all but one were guesses.




TheGirlBytheSeaofCortez (Madly77) carol (akittykat) wrote: "Psionics is the study and/or practice of using the mind to induce paranormal phenomena. Examples of this include telepathy, telekinesis, and other workings of the outside world through the psyche. ..."

My writing partner would love this word. He lives in a haunted house that seems to get a lot of time in the press. He now firmly believes in ghosts. I don't, but I believe something is going on in his house.



message 17: by Newengland, Mad Mod (new)

Newengland | 12332 comments How does one drum up a writing partner who lives in a haunted house? (Note: This question is in two parts.)


TheGirlBytheSeaofCortez (Madly77) You just get lucky. ;) He's also a PEN/Faulkner winner. Whenever he sees an email from me with the subject line, "Help!" he knows I need help with a solo project.


message 19: by Newengland, Mad Mod (new)

Newengland | 12332 comments That does it. Now you have to name names. I love pens but have little room for Faulkner's truck.


TheGirlBytheSeaofCortez (Madly77) I think he favors Hemingway. My writing partner.


message 21: by Newengland, Mad Mod (new)

Newengland | 12332 comments Ditto.

-- Your Posting Partner


TheGirlBytheSeaofCortez (Madly77) But I prefer Faulkner. It's not a problem, though.


Ruth | 10857 comments And I like 'em both.


message 24: by Newengland, Mad Mod (new)

Newengland | 12332 comments Wow. I always thought they were "east is east and west is west" authors. You're either right or left hemisphered and you either like Hemingway or Faulkner the Fraud.


Carol | 9307 comments I am strange. I like them both.


message 26: by Newengland, Mad Mod (new)

Newengland | 12332 comments Now, now Gabs. Hemingway's more complex than that. Or maybe much more simple. He's all gorilla bluster. Really a hopeless and bitter Romantic. It's hard to read A Moveable (Sic) Feast and conclude otherwise. But you've accurately nailed the stereotype his enemies have built of him.


Carol | 9307 comments Faulkner won the Nobel Prize in the 40's, and he had a well known battle with alcohol. Faulkner edges out Hemingway by a snoot.


message 28: by Newengland, Mad Mod (new)

Newengland | 12332 comments opine -- "often connotes the forming of a judgment on insufficient grounds." (Bryan Garner)

(I wonder if he means weak coffee.)


message 29: by Carol (last edited Nov 10, 2009 05:28PM) (new)

Carol | 9307 comments (a.) Ahungered; longing.


Ruth | 10857 comments I like Hemingway's shorts.


message 31: by Newengland, Mad Mod (new)

Newengland | 12332 comments Bermudas. (Oh, wait. He lived in Cuba.)


David | 4568 comments A bunch of bananas and a bottle of gin.




message 33: by Newengland, Mad Mod (new)

Newengland | 12332 comments daiquiri (weird -- and if you drink enough -- wonderful)


David | 4568 comments A hickory daiquiri, Doc!


Ruth | 10857 comments David wrote: "A hickory daiquiri, Doc!"

Guhroooaaan.




TheGirlBytheSeaofCortez (Madly77) Gabi wrote: "Never read Faulkner. Don't like Hemingway, he's all "men are men and the women are glad of it" bullshit. Fighting the bulls, hunting the lions, F.....g the women, drinking & dancing till dawn, yawn! "

I agree. Some of his short stories are superbly written, but he's just too testosterone driven for me.




TheGirlBytheSeaofCortez (Madly77) Ruth wrote: "David wrote: "A hickory daiquiri, Doc!"

Guhroooaaan.

"


Depths




message 38: by Newengland, Mad Mod (new)

Newengland | 12332 comments schism

It's weird. And it's wonderful -- if the schism is with your mother-in-law.


TheGirlBytheSeaofCortez (Madly77) I actually know that word! :)

adnascentia

Every winter, until we got rid of the willows, the adnascentia would shift. (A shame, too, because I love willows.)


message 40: by [deleted user] (new)



quite like the sound of.. Verisimilitude (think it's the appearance of truth?)


TheGirlBytheSeaofCortez (Madly77) I'm going to change my pilliver soon. (Old English for a pillowcase.)


message 42: by Newengland, Mad Mod (new)

Newengland | 12332 comments Verisimilitude is weird. Pilliver is wonderful. In fact, I think I read the book. Pilliver's Travels, it was.


message 43: by Carol (last edited Jan 10, 2010 06:31PM) (new)

Carol | 9307 comments lexophile- is a person who loves words and word plays


1. A bicycle can't stand alone; it is two tired.

2. A will is a dead giveaway.

3. A backward poet writes inverse

4. The guy who fell onto an upholstery machine was fully recovered.

5. A chicken crossing the road: poultry in motion.

6. A calendar's days are numbered.









Savvy  (SavvySuzdolcefarniente) | 1450 comments carol (akittykat) wrote: "lexophile- is a person who loves words and word play.

My kinda fun Carol!



TheGirlBytheSeaofCortez (Madly77) Newengland wrote: "Verisimilitude is weird. Pilliver is wonderful. In fact, I think I read the book. Pilliver's Travels, it was."

I probably have to use verisimilitude on a daily basis with the writers I work with. *sigh* They need to learn about that BEFORE sending something to me.




Anna | 447 comments Gabi wrote: "Never read Faulkner. Don't like Hemingway, he's all "men are men and the women are glad of it" bullshit. Fighting the bulls, hunting the lions, F.....g the women, drinking & dancing till dawn, yawn! "

I have to agree with you Gabi. Hemingway has always induced a *yawn* from me. And not for lack of trying. I gave him 2nd, 3rd and 4th chances thinking I was missing something.

A weird and wonderful word:
gleimous-
slimy, full of phlegm

from http://www.savethewords.org/



TheGirlBytheSeaofCortez (Madly77) I don't like Hemingway for the same reason. I think he's a good writer, but he's just too testosterone driven for me.


message 48: by Newengland, Mad Mod (new)

Newengland | 12332 comments Once you get to know him, you learn otherwise.


Carol | 9307 comments I like Papa H. I also like Faulkner and Steinbeck.


message 50: by Newengland, Mad Mod (new)

Newengland | 12332 comments The best example of his work would be two parts gobbledy and one part gook.


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Books mentioned in this topic

The Old Man and the Sea (other topics)
The Grapes of Wrath (other topics)
Shrubbery Skulduggery (other topics)