Roger Zelazny's Books discussion

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message 1: by Jim, Keeper of the Pattern (new)

Jim (JimMacLachlan) | 858 comments This Immortal by Roger Zelazny is one of my all time favorites. Discuss it here. Spoilers Welcome!


message 2: by Jim, Keeper of the Pattern (new)

Jim (JimMacLachlan) | 858 comments Depending on the printing, these paragraphs would fit in on the second or third page of the 1966 Ace edition. What was erroneously referred to as the 'missing piece' of the book turns out to be a short bit of background included for the edited version of the book when it appeared in SF&F. It really doesn't add anything to the 1966 Ace edition, IMO.

The paragraph that starts with “In attempting to reconstruct the affairs of these past six months, …” and ends with “…just how influential, I found out only five days ago.” Continues with one more sentence and then nine short paragraphs, as follows:

…And the long-dormant Radpol was stirring again, but I did not know that until several days later.

The Radpol. The old Radpol…

Once chief among the stirrers of disruption, The Radpol had lapsed into long quiescence.

After the departure of its sinister, half-man founder, Karaghiosis the killer (who, strangely resembled me, a very few old-timers have said --- tut!), the Radpol weakened, had slept.

It had done its necessary troubling, hover, over a half century ago, and the Vegans stayed stalemated.

But Vega could buy the Earthoffice – which runs this blamed world – and sell it many times over for kicks from out of the Petty Cash drawer – because Earthgov Absentia lives off Vegan droppings.

Vega hadn’t been too eager to try it, though.

Not since the Radpol let the Returnist Rebellion, melted Madagascar, and showed them that they cared. Earthgov had been busy selling pieces of real estate, to Vegans; this, via the Office, Earthgov’s civil service infection here among the isles of the world.

All sales ceased, Vega withdrew, and the Radpol dozed, dreaming its Big Dream – of the return of men to Earth.

The Office went on administering. The days of Karaghiosis had passed.

There is then a section break & the next section starts “As we wandered among the olive groves …”



message 3: by Jim, Keeper of the Pattern (new)

Jim (JimMacLachlan) | 858 comments Conrad's boat is named the "Golden Vanitie". According to the explanation in Power & Light, which contains "And Call Me Conrad", the name comes from Sir Walter Raleigh's boat. The only reference to that is a ballad about a betrayed boy, though & it doesn't seem to fit.

There are several ways the story goes since it is an old ballad from the 1600's. I listened to Pete Seeger's rendition last night. The ship is close to capture by a Turkish galley & everyone is in despair. The captain offers 5000 pounds & his daughter's hand in marriage to the man that gets them out of the mess, so a young boy swims under the galley & bores holes in the hull. It sinks & he swims back, but the Captain won't honor his debt. They boy says he'd sink the ship if it wasn't for the crew & let's himself drown.

I just don't see how this fits with Conrad's boat. I can't believe the name is random. Anyone have any ideas?


message 4: by Jim, Keeper of the Pattern (new)

Jim (JimMacLachlan) | 858 comments Erich said that Conrad is Hercules, which is spelled out in the following, just a few pages into the book:

"...It told the story of a young wrestler named Themocles, a wrestler who had never been beaten. He eventually came to consider himself the greatest wrestler alive. Finally he called out his challenge from a mountaintop, and, that being too near home, the gods acted fast: the following day a crippled boy rode into the town, on the plated back of a huge wild dog. They wrestled for three days and three nights. Themocles and the boy, and on the fourth day the boy broke his back, and left him there in the field....Besides, that's not the way it really happened."

I remember Hercules wrestling a lot of things, but best was Antaeus, who got his strength from contact with the earth.

From what I read in Zelazny's collected works, I think this is one of the places where he makes a case for Conrad to actually be the god Pan.

In either case, it is one of the more interesting places where I say, "Huh? How could he know?" Of course, we find out that he is old, although never how old, & has a plated dog, too.

It's interesting that he does say centuries, not millenia. Later on, he plays the pipes for the satyrs & that adds more fuel to the idea that he might be Pan.


message 5: by Erich (last edited Sep 22, 2009 11:07AM) (new)

Erich Franz Guzmann (ErichFranzGuzmann) | 22 comments Hmmm, interesting! Playing the pipes for the satyrs does add a lot of fuel to Conrad being Pan. I never thought of that until you mentioned it. Also, Conrad had mutilated face and I don't ever remember from anything that I read that Hercules had any sort of mutilations. But what about Pan, was he mutilated in any way? And was he as good as a fighter as Zelazny told that Conrad was? Because I know Hercules had that kind of strength and fight in him. Very interesting! I may have to read it for a third time this year now! :)

What is meant by this Jim? "I remember Hercules wrestling a lot of things, but best was Antaeus, who got his strength from contact with the earth." THX!


message 6: by Jim, Keeper of the Pattern (new)

Jim (JimMacLachlan) | 858 comments It meant that I don't recall a Greek legend about this wrestling match nor a reference to Themocles & couldn't find any reference when I googled it.

I read some stories about both Hercules & Pan. I thought Conrad fit Pan better, but I could see the Hercules bit with the wrestling & the references to his fight with the golem of Hassan's. Even refers to Antaeus in that fight. Still, in that scene, he definitely refers to Hercules as a different person, unlike his more Pan-like moments where he's not as specific.

At the glade, he says he met a 'half-namesake' which could be a Kallikanzaros but satyrs were closely related to Pan, too. "... it had been too many years since I had played for them." & he plays the pipes which were Pan's instrument that he created kind of because of his lust. That's where they get the name syrinx because she was hidden from him in the reeds.

I didn't see anything about Pan being a great warrior, but he was a god & they're all pretty tough & scrappy. Nor do I recall anything about Pan being scarred, but he was supposed to have goat legs & be constantly horny. Conrad seems to be somewhat promiscuous & not particularly bothered by a woman's marital status.

Pan is also known as the protector of the great goddess, Gaia, or the earth. Too appropriate in the context of this story. He was also seen as a depiction of the devil in Medieval times, so that fits well with Conrad.


Joy H. (JoyofGlensFalls) | 80 comments Just came across the following article re Zelazny's _This Immortal_ :
http://www.guardian.co.uk/books/books...

Do you think the reviewer has made some good points?

_This Immortal_ is the first Zelazny book I've ever read (and probably the first science fiction book I've ever read too). Jim told me about it. After I got into it, I found the story to be a good one, but at first I was a bit overwhelmed by all the unfamiliar references.

I think the review is a good one because it describes the various aspects of the book so well. I'm not sure I agree with the reviewer that the book "seems horribly passé" because, for me, it's a brand new genre. So I can't think of it as out of date.


message 8: by Jim, Keeper of the Pattern (new)

Jim (JimMacLachlan) | 858 comments Thanks, Joy! It's an interesting review, but I don't agree with him, of course, since I love the book & he didn't.

"The story, for instance, boils down to a standard cold-war mix of nuclear paranoia and alien invasion fear,..." isn't how I would boil it down at all. Sure, there was a nuclear war & it set the stage, but 'alien invasion fear"? I don't think so. This isn't like "War of the Worlds". One fear is the same kind people have of other income or ethnic groups 'invading' their neighborhoods or other countries buying up their land. (China?) The other is of a distant, disinterested & uninformed government making decisions for them. (The current oligarchy, I mean Federal government?) In that light, I think the story still stands as relevant.

"It's all as breathless and convoluted..." Again, I don't think so. It was a mystery, but hardly breathless. The pacing was excellent. Convoluted? Not really. No one knows exactly what any one else's motivations are, but that's what a mystery is all about. Lots of players? Not really. There's a small, core group & the rest are scenery.

His disparaging remarks about some of the dialog shows he really needs to re-read the book & broaden his classical literature background as well. The whole Ozymandias reference obviously went over his head. He needs to read both poems & place them in context with the book.

As for his take on the 'climactic showdown', I wonder if we read the same book. No, I'm pretty sure I read & understood the book & he didn't. The scene he refers to wasn't the 'climactic showdown'. It was an action scene toward the end. The real climax is when Conrad reads Phil's last note & decides that the Vegan must live.

It's pretty obvious he thought he understood the book & didn't.


Joy H. (JoyofGlensFalls) | 80 comments Jim wrote: "Thanks, Joy! It's an interesting review, but I don't agree with him, of course, since I love the book & he didn't.
"The story, for instance, boils down to a standard cold-war mix of nuclear par..."


Jim, I understand your criticisms of the review. Well done. I'm still too new to Zelazny's writing to come to any conclusions of my own. However, the reviewer stated:

"New types of monsters and mutations are introduced with barely a line apiece and vast chunks of history essential to the story are dealt with in seconds."

I kinda felt that way myself.


message 10: by Jim, Keeper of the Pattern (new)

Jim (JimMacLachlan) | 858 comments Most of the monsters & mutations are logical extensions of the established base; Greek myth & radiation causing mutations already known. Note that many of the mutations had established names. Many were scenery, not particularly important in & of themselves, more for the mood (chaotic), just like some of the bit characters.

I guess the big problem is trying to decide exactly what is important on the first read through, though. There is a lot going on in a few words. While the book seems like a short, quick read, it isn't.

For instance, there are at least two ways to view Conrad. Is he a man, a mutation born shortly after the 3 Days War or is he Pan? That point is purposely left ambiguous. Does it really make a difference in how the story is read?


message 11: by Joy H. (last edited Sep 25, 2009 09:18AM) (new)

Joy H. (JoyofGlensFalls) | 80 comments Jim wrote: "... That point is purposely left ambiguous. Does it really make a difference in how the story is read?"

It makes a difference to me because I haven't yet learned to tolerate ambiguity. I have a strong need to feel oriented, especially when reading or viewing films. Stories without exposition bother me. I don't like to be thrown into the middle of a thing and not know where I am.

What is "Pan"?

PS-About the word "Pan", Onelook.com says:
"(Greek mythology) god of fields and woods and shepherds and flocks; represented as a man with goat's legs and horns and ears; identified with Roman Sylvanus or Faunus"
I didn't know that.


Erich Franz Guzmann (ErichFranzGuzmann) | 22 comments Ambiguity can be a strong point for certain stories. Such as Ubik by Philip K. Dick, an all time favorite of mine. It left a good portion of the book wide open to my own personal interpretation; which is still changing and therefore changing in the book as well, I love that about it!

Pan is a God in Greek mythology, I am sure Jim can better describe him to you. But, as for Conrad being Pan; the more I learn about Pan the more I agree with Jim that Conrad is Pan. I know that Pan loved nature and would be one of the God's that would be on the front lines of a post-apocalyptic world and that would be for the reasons of his mutation, because he was there at the beginning. He was also a warrior and the reason we have the word "panic" to use in our language.

That review was strange to me. It seemed the writer of the review just doesn't like Zelzny and therefor was simply biased against his writings. He had a long list of reasons that criticize the novel, but not many of them were relevant. And maybe it was because he just didn't truly understand the novel.


Joy H. (JoyofGlensFalls) | 80 comments Erich wrote: "Ambiguity can be a strong point for certain stories. Such as Ubik by Philip K. Dick, an all time favorite of mine. It left a good portion of the book wide open to my own personal interpretation; ..."

Hi Erich. I'm not sure I would enjoy doing all that interpretation. Of course, one never knows. My likes and dislikes can be influenced by the writing style as well as the storyline.

I never knew the derivation of the word "panic". Thanks for mentioning that. Interesting.

Thank you for jumping in and answering my questions.


message 14: by Jim, Keeper of the Pattern (new)

Jim (JimMacLachlan) | 858 comments I think Erich said it all as well as I could.

Here's a link to a good article about Pan on Wikipedia:
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Pan

He's an interesting figure in legend & lore.


message 15: by Mohammed, Dilvish The Damned (last edited Sep 25, 2009 01:42PM) (new)

Mohammed (Maxamed) | 83 comments The ambiguity about Conrad being Pan or just a mutation made the book work for me.

I enjoyed the hole Greek Mythology side to the book. I read up on somethings after the book to understand the references.

That Guardian guy pissed off a little and show another reason why those smug mainstream mag reviewers are full of BS sometimes.

Of all the books to see only the visible,looking at shallowly......


message 16: by Joy H. (last edited Sep 25, 2009 02:05PM) (new)

Joy H. (JoyofGlensFalls) | 80 comments Jim wrote: "... Here's a link to a good article about Pan on Wikipedia: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Pan ..."

Ye gads, there's so much to learn! LOL Thanks, Jim.
I had forgotten about the pan flute.


Joy H. (JoyofGlensFalls) | 80 comments Mohammed wrote: "The ambiguity about Conrad being Pan or just a mutation made the book work for me. ... That Guardian guy pissed off a little and show another reason why those smug mainstream mag reviewers are full of BS sometimes."

Hi Mohammed. Yes, reading critic reviews has taught me to be a bit more critical myself... critical of the reviews!

One of my favorite reviewers is James Berardinelli. See a sample here:
http://www.reelviews.net/php_review_t...


message 18: by Jim, Keeper of the Pattern (new)

Jim (JimMacLachlan) | 858 comments I'd never read a review by Berardinelli, Joy. Very good review.

He won my applause with "Kaufman is clearly striving for greatness - "art" at the expense of all else, including logic - but he falls short by a considerable margin. Just because a movie is ambitious and challenging doesn't mean it can't also be tedious and at times unbearable."

I really got what he meant & can apply that to so many movies that were 'great'. What was that Vietnam one with Marlon Brando - the Heart of Darkness wannabe?


Joy H. (JoyofGlensFalls) | 80 comments Jim wrote: "I'd never read a review by Berardinelli, Joy. Very good review.
He won my applause with "Kaufman is clearly striving for greatness - "art" at the expense of all else, including logic..."


Jim, glad you liked Berardinelli's review. His style of writing is so clear and intelligent. His reviews can be found by clicking on the IMDb "external reviews" link at the column at the left of the movie web pages. Berardinelli always seems to hit the nail on the head.

"Heart of Darkness" was the book I recently found explained in my book, _Merriam-Webster's Encyclopedia of Literature_. I was away from my computer and needed a handy reference. There it was on my shelf! :)

Can't answer your question re the "Vietnam one with Marlon Brando". I wonder what movie that was.


Joy H. (JoyofGlensFalls) | 80 comments I found a great review (by Goodreads member, James Wong) of _This Immortal_. Thought you might enjoy it if you haven't already seen it. Below is a link to the review:
http://www.goodreads.com/review/show/...

Not sure if this post of mine belongs here in the "spoilers" section or not. But since I'm already in this thread, I thought I'd stay here. :)


message 21: by Jim, Keeper of the Pattern (new)

Jim (JimMacLachlan) | 858 comments "Apocalypse Now" was the Brando movie I was thinking of.

Interesting review by Wong. I'm not sure I agree with all he said, but he liked it, so that's a big plus.






message 22: by Mohammed, Dilvish The Damned (new)

Mohammed (Maxamed) | 83 comments I enjoyed that review, doesnt matter if you agree with everything he said. He atleast read the book and saw what the author was trying to tell.

Most other people think its just a post apocalyptic story.


Joy H. (JoyofGlensFalls) | 80 comments Jim wrote: ""Apocalypse Now" was the Brando movie I was thinking of.
Interesting review by Wong. I'm not sure I agree with all he said, but he liked it, so that's a big plus."


Below is a link to the Netflix review of "Apocalypse Now":
http://www.netflix.com/Movie/Apocalyp...

Most of the member reviews at the Netflix page are positive ones.
But one of the member reviewers (Starbuck) wrote:
"There was a documentary released some years later that dealt with the making of the movie. How far Martin Sheen had to go to reach that Horrible scene in the beginning, not to mention Marlen Brando's theatrics that gave Coppola a heart attack."

I wonder what he meant by that. I didn't see the movie. (Sorry to go off topic.)


message 24: by Jim, Keeper of the Pattern (new)

Jim (JimMacLachlan) | 858 comments I brought it up, Joy. I'll slap myself. OK, back off topic.

Everyone I knew thought 'Apocalypse Now' was over done. There were scenes that just dragged on for ever because of some artsy, Zen thing that Brando was trying to accomplish. The 'Heart of Darkness' pastiche that I was mentioning. It had some really good scenes too, bot after seeing it once, I wasn't tempted to again.

Might be worth a shot again since I have a fast forward button now.


message 25: by Mohammed, Dilvish The Damned (last edited Sep 26, 2009 06:29PM) (new)

Mohammed (Maxamed) | 83 comments I saw a a great Marlo Brando documentary that told how Brando came to shooting of the film overweight much more than expected by Coppola since the man he was based on was fit.

How Brando refused to listen to Coppola and start acting when the director wanted. How he wanted 100s of thousand dollars extra to shoot the last scenes,the last days.

The shadow angles of his scenes that might look artsy,over done was to hide how big Brando had got.

Doesnt change the fact that he was a brilliant actor above all the others in his lifetime in hollywood.


Joy H. (JoyofGlensFalls) | 80 comments Jim: I'm not a fan of overly artsy stuff myself. I want to shout: "OK, I get the point... get on with it!".

Mohammed: I love hearing behind-the-scenes details.

Back onto the topic: I just want to say that the ending of _This Immortal_ was a very satisfying one and came as a big surprise. After all the horror and fright, the ending was a big relief. How do you spell relief: G-O-O-D E-N-D-I-N-G. (Remember that commercial? Or are you too young? LOL )
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Rolaids


message 27: by Jim, Keeper of the Pattern (new)

Jim (JimMacLachlan) | 858 comments I am not too young to remember it. I feel that old this morning, plus a few years. Oh, I HATE driving for hours & hours.

Back n topic... That's one of the things that is different about "This Immortal" from most books & movies. The climactic scene wasn't an action one. While the fight with the boar does resolve some things, the main thrust of the story is resolved by that note from Phil. It ties everything together & makes sense out of most of the mysteries.


Joy H. (JoyofGlensFalls) | 80 comments Jim wrote: "I am not too young to remember it. I feel that old this morning, plus a few years. Oh, I HATE driving for hours & hours.
Back n topic... That's one of the things that is different about "This I..."


It's funny how just riding in a car for hours can be exhausting, but it is.

About endings of stories, I like things tied up nicely. Can't stand a book with a disappointing ending. Such a let-down. _The Plague of Doves A Novel_ by Louise Erdrich (which I hated) had such an ambiguous ending. After struggling through the convoluted story, I couldn't figure out who the culprit had been. When I ask supposedly sophisticated readers about it, they always seem to beat around the bush. They don't seem to know exactly who the culprit was either. A-a-rgh! And that book was a finalist for the Pulitzer Prize in 2009!!!


Jackie (thelastwolf) Sadly, I didn't like this novel all that much. The ending was so abrupt and left me with a lot of questions. I didn't feel the story was going anywhere, and it didn't. Maybe if Zelazny made it into a larger novel I would have gotten what I wanted out of it. Still, I like his easy style.


message 30: by Jim, Keeper of the Pattern (new)

Jim (JimMacLachlan) | 858 comments I am sorry you didn't like it, Jackie. It's one of my favorite books. It was more of an action character study done in references, I suppose. It's always struck a chord with me.


Jackie (thelastwolf) It's not that I didn't like it, just not a fav. Sometimes the first book you read by an author holds a special place in your heart, for me that's Amber.


Slickriptide | 15 comments Just finished reading the group, since I had just yesterday finished a re-read of the novel.

I'm curious - where did this idea of Conrad <=> Pan come from? I never saw any reason to take his story of his "birth" as anything other than the truth as he knew it.

That is, the story of his parents leaving their baby to die of exposure, then being forced to recover the child by the local priest only to discover that their mutant child had been swapped for another less mutant (sort of) child.


message 33: by Jim, Keeper of the Pattern (new)

Jim (JimMacLachlan) | 858 comments The book itself mentions the idea several times. There's a really good write up on it in the Collected Works.


message 34: by Slickriptide (last edited Oct 28, 2011 02:38PM) (new)

Slickriptide | 15 comments I may be too much of a literalist. I don't recall anything that would ever have suggested that to me.

I guess that I should ask whether the comparison is meant literally or figuratively. Playing pipes for satyrs doesn't make one a pagan deity. It just makes you someone who appreciates all of the mysteries of an ancient land, especially when that person is apparently immortal and has a deep connection to that land.


message 35: by Jim, Keeper of the Pattern (new)

Jim (JimMacLachlan) | 858 comments I don't know much about Pan. Knowing Zelazny there were similarities in some of the major events. I'm of the same persuasion as you. Makes it hard to argue.
;-)

This is one of my all time favorite books. The Einstein Intersection is another & was written the same year. Have you read it?


ckovacs | 117 comments Slickriptide wrote: "I may be too much of a literalist. I don't recall anything that would ever have suggested that to me.

I guess that I should ask whether the comparison is meant literally or figuratively. Playing p..."


I think you need to read the essay in The Collected Stories because you've missed the clues. More importantly, Zelazny said "either Conrad is a mutant or he is the Great God Pan. The book may be read either way."


message 37: by Slickriptide (last edited Oct 31, 2011 10:19AM) (new)

Slickriptide | 15 comments Well, I'm glad that Zelazny says the book can be read either way. For me, the story loses most of its charm if Conrad is literally a supernatural being. (I realize that many readers may experience the opposite reaction.)

I wouldn't say I missed the clues (for instance, the business of Conrad's answer to "what happened to the old gods" and the general undercurrent of theological symbolism that runs throughout the story, overt and otherwise). I'd just say that I never considered interpreting them in any kind of literal sense. If Conrad is Pan, then do we conclude that Hasan is truly possessed by Angelsou and not just learning that smoking a strige-fluer is a bad idea? Is Thoth out there someplace brooding about the loss of The Great Pyramid? Is the earthquake that sinks Kos a manifestation of the displeasure of Poseidon?

For my part, the story works just fine without any literal supernatural agencies at work within its strictures. The story is more interesting if the world is descending into an age of myth coming to life than if Conrad is some kind representative of the Gods who were there all along in the background.

It's a distraction that doesn't really add anything to the story, IMO.


message 38: by ckovacs (last edited Oct 31, 2011 01:06PM) (new)

ckovacs | 117 comments Slickriptide wrote: "I wouldn't say I missed the clues ..."

You'd written:
"I'm curious - where did this idea of Conrad <=> Pan come from? I never saw any reason to take his story of his "birth" as anything other than the truth as he knew it."

and then:
"I don't recall anything that would ever have suggested that to me."

That sounds pretty clearly like you missed the clues and concluded that there's no reason to think Conrad might be Pan, and that's what I responded to.

Zelazny didn't exaggerate it to the point that you've done, suggesting that if Pan is still there then Thoth and Poseidon must be around influencing events (reductio ad absurdum).

No, he simply suggested two possibilities: a) that lonely old Conrad might be Pan, the last of the Greek gods who has remained behind after all this time to look after Earth and the few people left on it, or b) that he's a simple human with a vague past and possibly a longer life than usual due to the mutational effects from fallout of the prior nuclear war. He deliberately put the multiple clues there so that the book could be interpreted on two levels. A lot of readers and reviewers have responded to those clues in the past, sometimes with the mistaken interpretation that Conrad must be Dionysus. That's one of the reasons that Zelazny clarified in interviews that he meant that Conrad might be Pan, not Dionysus.

His full name is Conrad Nomikos, and Nomikos / Nomios is one of the names associated with Pan. That's one of the first clues.

In my opinion it's not a distraction but something that adds to the story. Who is Conrad, really? One can wonder about it and draw one's own conclusions. Or one can overlook all of it and just enjoy the story for what it's worth without caring who or what Conrad really is.

There's no one right way to read a story or interpret it. But one of the things that draws me to Zelazny's work is that much of it can be enjoyed on multiple levels, or simply on the main level of its face value. When I catch something on the nth reading that I missed the first time around, it just adds to the enjoyment and my appreciation for how ingenious and subtle Zelazny could be.


message 39: by Slickriptide (last edited Oct 31, 2011 02:03PM) (new)

Slickriptide | 15 comments Heh. You're correct, of course, in that failing to interpret something as a clue is pretty much missing the clue entirely. My point was more that I noticed those things but assumed that they were the earmarks of the sort of person who would be an immortal steward of monuments and antiquities, particularly someone raised in one of the worlds oldest cultures.

In fact, despite Roger himself stating that the ambiguity is purposely there, I really still don't see it myself. I can see how you could imagine it being there but the Conrad Nomikos in my head is firmly entrenched in the material world. In a story whose basic essence is that the post-Holocaust world is a mirror of the pre-scientific world, then a coincidence like Conrad's name mirroring a god is no more meaningful than the Black Beast's resemblance to the Erymanthian Boar. Perhaps Conrad is really Heracles. The tour certainly put him through many labors...

The beauty of literature, though, is that each of us takes something different from our experience with it. :) If Zelazny found some amusement in painting in that ambiguity and readers find amusement in noting it, then I have no beef with any of that. :)


message 40: by Jim, Keeper of the Pattern (new)

Jim (JimMacLachlan) | 858 comments I always wondered at how a Greek peasant, born so far out that they didn't have an up to date calendar, knew where so much of the old art was hidden. He tells someone, Diane I think, that's one of the reasons he got his present job.


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Books mentioned in this topic

This Immortal (other topics)
Power & Light (other topics)
Merriam-Webster's Encyclopedia of Literature (other topics)
The Plague of Doves (other topics)
The Einstein Intersection (other topics)
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Authors mentioned in this topic

Roger Zelazny (other topics)
Louise Erdrich (other topics)