Book Nook Cafe discussion

202 views
Health-Exercise-Diet > Recipe Thread #1

Comments (showing 201-250 of 565) (565 new)    post a comment »

Carol/Bonadie (Bonadie) | 73 comments madrano wrote: "Carol, please let us know how the potato casserole goes...."

YUMYUMYUM!!!


It was a hit, all thanks to Donna for providing me with the recipe. It was super-easy. I started it about 8:30 on Sunday night and it took no time at all to put together, and I was dead tired. This recipe is impervious to casual cooks. I left it in too long because I was too lazy to come downstairs to check it out, so the top was a little brown. As you know I had it in the refrigerator all day at work, and then I was going to heat it up at the pot luck. I probably left it in too longer there, too, and I was afraid it would be too dry, but it got raves. Someone even recognized the recipe, said her mother used to make it. I brought home less than half for leftovers and heated it up again for dinner tonite. My dad gave it a thumbs up, and he is a picky eater. So again, thanks! I'm ready for any other recommendations for pot lucks, that was fun!


Donna in Southern Maryland (Cedarville922) | 212 comments Carol/Bonadie wrote: "madrano wrote: "Carol, please let us know how the potato casserole goes...."

YUMYUMYUM!!!


It was a hit, all thanks to Donna for providing me with the recipe. It was super-easy. I started it ab..."



I'm so glad Carol! That recipe is just about 'ruin-proof!' It is one of the joys of my life to teach people about cooking and passing on good recipes. Thanks for the feedback, and I'm so glad it worked out for you. Guess I'll have to start sharing more recipes.

Donna


JoAnn/QuAppelle | 712 comments So today I made something really healthy -- NOT!!!

I just found out that the flowers of the chive plant can be used like an herb.

My chive plant, which survived our brutal winter, has blossoms on it, so I snipped and chopped five flowers, then added them to a quarter pound of softened butter. Made it into a log, refrigerated it, then cut it into pieces which I froze to use on bread or veggies.

It is beautiful looking, with flecks of purple, and is soooooo good.


Alias Reader (AliasReader) | 8317 comments I love herb butter. I love all butter ! :-O

JoAnn, I think you will enjoy and agree with the article from the magazine Scientific American that I am going to post in our Health/diet thread.
You will especially enjoy the last line of the article.


madrano | 912 comments JoAnn/QuAppelle wrote: "So today I made something really healthy -- NOT!!!

I just found out that the flowers of the chive plant can be used like an herb.

My chive plant, which survived our brutal winter, has blossoms o..."


Sounds good. I hope to remember that, as our chives are little used & go to flower quickly in Texas. Freezing it is perfect. Thanks.

deborah


Alias Reader (AliasReader) | 8317 comments For all you people who like the Food channel, now there is another food centered channel.

It just launched. It's called the Cooking Channel.

Here is a link.

http://www.cookingchanneltv.com/?affi...


madrano | 912 comments Do we really need two channels? I suppose if sports have two (actually, several sports have their OWN channel--golf, for instance!) then food feels justified. One ad i saw at the link was for a video of a Food Network show ("Next Food Network Star"), so maybe they are affiliated?

I saw a term used which i just learned last month, Spatchcocked Chicken. We've been grilling & cooking this way for years unaware of the word. Somehow i doubt this makes us ahead of the curve, however.

deb


Alias Reader (AliasReader) | 8317 comments I like that it has some of the older shows. Galloping Gourmet, Julia Child. I also see they have Jamie Oliver. They do seem to be showing some Food Network shows, so maybe they are connected.


JoAnn/QuAppelle | 712 comments Alias, the new cooking channel is a spinoff by the Food Network

http://www.dallasnews.com/sharedconte...


madrano | 912 comments I was trying to find the posts were we discussed roasted chick peas. I remember mentioning them & JoAnn trying a batch, which she liked. Couldn't find it. Still, i wanted to share that i tried my recipe, made with "Moroccian Spice Mix", which i had to make, using the numerous spices DD has onhand. Well, they were a huge hit with her friends. I felt they were over-roasted. It's a fine line.

One of DD's friends said she tried making them in a crock pot. I thought that would be handy but, in fact, not. She said half were overdone & half were still soft in the middle. For my batch, i don't think the spice mix did much. Maybe i added too little or maybe many of the herbs & spices were too old but i could only occasionally taste more than the roasted nuggets.

Now then, while traversing these recipes, i realized i need to get busy once i get home. There are so many recipes here & i've tried so few.

The other thing i found out is that even if a person leaves GR, their posts remain. They are just labeled, "By Deleted Member." Good to know.

deborah


JoAnn/QuAppelle | 712 comments madrano wrote: "
The other thing i found out is that even if a person leaves GR, their posts remain. They are just labeled, "By Deleted Member." Good to know..."


I wonder who deleted the member(s)?


Bobbie57 (bobbie572002) | 917 comments JoAnn/QuAppelle wrote: "madrano wrote: "
The other thing i found out is that even if a person leaves GR, their posts remain. They are just labeled, "By Deleted Member." Good to know..."

I wonder who deleted the member(s)?"


I would hope that it was the former member themselves.


madrano | 912 comments I assumed it was someone deleting themselves. Is there a way to leave a forum? Wait, i know there is, as i left one. Hmmm. Only one of them was signed "Jennifer". She called her mother "Ma" & mentioned stuffed cabbage. Yum!

Alias, do you get a notice if someone leaves this group? I wondered about that when i left the one i did, too. Since i knew no one there, i didn't know how to find out.

deb


Alias Reader (AliasReader) | 8317 comments The only thing I notice is the number of members goes up or down.

I've left groups. That is when you will see -deleted member- if that person has left any posts in that group.

I do have the option of removing a person from the group, but have never done so.

You can leave a group that you signed up for.
If you go to that groups HOME PAGE, under the list of links you see on the right, and just above the search box, it says YOU ARE A MEMBER OF THIS GROUP (EDIT)
Click on edit to leave the group.


madrano | 912 comments Thanks for the answers, Alias. The group i left was on Goodreads. It was easy to do but i never thought to see if my posts were deleted or what.

deborah


Alias Reader (AliasReader) | 8317 comments I was going through old emails. I'd saved this one from Whole Foods. I know a few of you get the WH email.

This one I found intriguing. I never thought to use beans as a sort of mashed potato substitute.

Did anyone here try it?



Pureed Navy Beans

Pureed Navy Beans is a great substitute for mashed potatoes in your Healthiest Way of Eating. Rich in dietary fiber, it can help maintain normal cholesterol levels and blood sugar levels. And it's delicious. Enjoy!

Prep and Cook Time: 15 minutes
Ingredients:

2 cans navy beans, drained
1 medium onion, chopped
6 cloves garlic, chopped
1 tsp chopped fresh rosemary
1 + 2 TBS vegetable broth
salt and black pepper to taste

Directions:
Chop onions and garlic and let sit for 5 minutes to enhance their health-promoting properties
Heat 1 TBS broth in a 10-inch stainless steel skillet. Healthy Sauté onions in broth over medium heat for 5 minutes stirring frequently, until translucent. Add garlic and continue to sauté for another minute stirring constantly.
Add beans, rosemary and the remaining 2 TBS of broth. Cook for another 5 minutes.
Puree in blender making sure you don't fill more than half full, and start on low speed. You will have to stop the blender a couple times and scrape the sides with a rubber spatula. Season with salt and pepper. Serves 4
Healthy Cooking Tips:

It is best to stop the blender a couple of times and scrape the sides. By being patient with this, you won't need to add extra liquid, and your beans will have a firmer consistency when done.

http://whfoods.org


Alias Reader (AliasReader) | 8317 comments This recipe sounds good. I am not a cilantro fan, so I would substitute parsley or basil for it.

If you try it, let us know how you liked it.


Black Bean and Barley Salad

Preparation time: 10 min Servings: 4
Cooking time: 40 min

Ingredients:
2 tbsp cilantro, chopped
1/2 cup pearled barley
1-1/2 cups water
1/2 cup green peas, thawed if frozen
3/4 cup Italian style peeled tomatoes, drained and chopped
3/4 cup corn kernels, thawed if frozen
1/2 avocado, chopped
1 cup canned black beans, drained
1 tbsp lemon juice
1/4 cup water
1-1/2 tsp olive oil
1 scallion, white part only, finely chopped
1 clove garlic, crushed
1/4 lb packaged salad

Cooking Directions:
Bring water to a boil in a heavy pot. Add barley and reduce heat to low. Cover and simmer 35-40 minutes until water has evaporated and barley is tender. Remove from heat. Transfer barley to a cookie sheet. Spread barley out to cool briefly. While barley is cooking, combine next 7 ingredients and salt to taste in a salad bowl. Cover and refrigerate until barley is cooled. Combine remaining ingredients, except lettuce, in a jar with a tight-fitting lid. Shake vigorously until emulsified. Set aside. Transfer cooled barley to bean and vegetable mixture. Toss. Add dressing and toss again. Serve on a bed of lettuce.


Nutrition Facts
Calories 190
% Calories From Fat 24.6%
Total Fat 5.2g
Cholesterol 0mg
Sodium 250mg
Total Carbohydrates 31g
Dietary Fiber 9g
Sugar 3.7g
Protein 7.2g

http://www.qualityhealth.com/healthy-...


message 218: by Mike (new)

Mike (mikesgoodreads) | 294 comments They have a market here in Portland like Whole Foods called New Seasons... http://newseasonsmarket.com/

They are building a brand new one a block and a half from my house. It's due to open in about a month. I can't wait.


Alias Reader (AliasReader) | 8317 comments Unfortunately, I don't have a WF near me. Though I do get their free newsletter. It really is quite informative.


message 220: by Mike (new)

Mike (mikesgoodreads) | 294 comments Alias Reader wrote: "Unfortunately, I don't have a WF near me. Though I do get their free newsletter. It really is quite informative."

New Seasons is really good. We have them and WF here in Portland and NS is considered the better of the two by most. The one fixin' to open near me built the parking lot of top of the building to minimize the footprint in the neighborhood. I thought that was pretty cool. They are going to be having all kinds of specials when they first open of course too. I could throw a rock and almost hit the place from my front yard.


message 221: by Julie (last edited Sep 19, 2010 05:26PM) (new)

Julie (readerjules) | 866 comments The newsletter at whfoods.org has nothing to do with Whole Foods the store. It is The George Mateljan Foundation which is a guy that wrote the book that's on the website. I own it, but don't use it nearly as much as I should. I do want to try that black bean and barley salad now that you mention it!


madrano | 912 comments Mike wrote: "Alias Reader wrote: "Unfortunately, I don't have a WF near me. Though I do get their free newsletter. It really is quite informative."

New Seasons is really good. We have them and WF here in Por..."


Mike, i'm drawing a blank. There used to be a small, small chain of whole food stores, which was bought out by WF. Do you recall the name of the old one? My real question is whether New Seasons is in any way affiliated with the old owners. For a long time WF kept the "format" of the original store, meaning i could bag my own stuff. Then we moved and no other WF had that feature until we moved to Texas. Just wondering.

deb


Alias Reader (AliasReader) | 8317 comments Julie wrote: "The newsletter at whfoods.org has nothing to do with Whole Foods the store. It is The George Mateljan Foundation which is a guy that wrote the book that's on the website. I own it, but don't use it..."
---------------

Thanks for clarifying that. I thought it was the store.


message 224: by Mike (new)

Mike (mikesgoodreads) | 294 comments madrano wrote: "Do you recall the name of the old one? My real question is whether New Seasons is in any way affiliated with the old owners. For a long time WF kept the "format" of the original store, meaning i could bag my own stuff. Then we moved and no other WF had that feature until we moved to Texas. Just wondering."

I think the first place was called Wild Oats Market. And they were bought out by WF. I'm not completely sure but I think that's right. One thing I do know is WF and NS are having or had some kind of legal wrangling. That kind of flies in the face of their philosophies I think.


Julie (readerjules) | 866 comments I was thinking Wild Oats also. That was a store, but I am not positive its the right one.


Alias Reader (AliasReader) | 8317 comments http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Wild_Oat...

Whole Foods officially completed their buyout of Wild Oats on 27 August 2007[9] Whole Foods plans to remodel some Wild Oats locations before rebranding them to the "Whole Foods" name. Other Wild Oats locations will either be relocated or closed. In October 2007 the company completed the sale of all 35 Henry's Farmers Market and Sun Harvest Market stores to a subsidiary of Los Angeles grocer Smart & Final Inc. for $166 million.[10]


JoAnn/QuAppelle | 712 comments Then there is Fresh Market, a lovely grocery chain akin to Whole Foods.

http://www.thefreshmarket.com/

Locations: http://www.thefreshmarket.com/stores/...

They also have wonderful flowers that are so reasonable.


JoAnn/QuAppelle | 712 comments Giada made the most delicious-looking soup the other day on her show (if you like asparagus). It was so simple and had just a few ingredients and is almost low-fat. I cannot wait to make it.

Asparagus Soup with Herbed Goat Cheese
Recipe courtesy Giada De Laurentiis

Prep Time:10 min
Inactive Prep Time:30 min
Cook Time:18 min
Level:Easy
Serves:4 to 6 servings (6 1/2 cups)

to make Herbed Goat cheese:

1/2 cup (4 ounces) goat cheese, at room temperature
2 tablespoons chopped fresh basil leaves
Kosher salt and freshly ground black pepper
Vegetable oil cooking spray

Soup Ingredients:

2 tablespoons unsalted butter, at room temperature
1 large leek (white and light green part only), thinly sliced
4 cups low-sodium chicken broth
2 pounds medium asparagus, trimmed and cut into 1-inch pieces (do not use asparagus that is too thin or too thick)
1/2 cup chopped fresh basil leaves
Kosher salt and freshly ground black pepper

Directions
Goat cheese: Line a small baking sheet with parchment/waxed paper. Set aside.

Using a fork, in a small bowl, combine the goat cheese and basil until smooth. Season with salt and pepper, to taste. Using a round tablespoon measure sprayed with vegetable oil cooking spray, scoop the goat cheese into balls and arrange on the prepared baking sheet. Refrigerate for 30 minutes.

Soup: In a Dutch oven or large saucepan, heat the butter over medium heat. Add the leeks and cook, stirring constantly until softened, about 3 to 4 minutes. Add the asparagus and saute a couple of minutes, then add broth and basil. Season with salt and pepper, to taste. Increase the heat to high and bring the mixture to a boil. Reduce to a simmer and cook until the asparagus is tender, about 15 minutes. Using an immersion blender, blend the soup until smooth. Season with salt and pepper, to taste. Keep the soup warm over low heat.

To serve: Ladle the soup into shallow bowls and garnish with the herbed goat cheese. (Someone mentioned subbing sour cream, but I love goat cheese)

Cook's Note: The soup can also be pureed by ladling, in batches, into a food processor or blender and blended until smooth.


message 229: by Mike (new)

Mike (mikesgoodreads) | 294 comments JoAnn/QuAppelle wrote: "(if you like asparagus)"

I love it! I even like the smell in your tinkle after eating it.

I am going to try this recipe sometime this week.


Alias Reader (AliasReader) | 8317 comments JoAnn/QuAppelle wrote: "Giada made the most delicious-looking soup the other day on her show (if you like asparagus). It was so simple and had just a few ingredients and is almost low-fat. I cannot wait to make it.

Aspar..."


-------------

Thanks for posting that, JoAnn. I printed myself out a copy. It sounds delicious. I love goat cheese. Well, almost any cheese. :)

Of all the cooking shows, I think Giada's recipes are the ones I most consistently think I would like to make and eat.

Though she does need to tone that smile.


madrano | 912 comments Mike wrote: "I think the first place was called Wild Oats Market. And they were bought out by WF. I'm not completely sure but I think that's right. One thing I do know is WF and NS are having or had some kind of legal wrangling. That kind of flies in the face of their philosophies I think. ..."

Thanks for trying, Mike, but that isn't the store in my mind. The one i'm searching to locate was a small chain was even pre-Wild Oats. The original was in Beaverton, too far for us to go very often. Then they opened a store on Hawthorne. However, WF bought them out fairly soon after that (or so it seemed). After living so many years in the Dakotas, where sole access to whole foods was via coops, it was a delightful change to not have to work hours to get healthy food.

deborah


message 232: by Mike (new)

Mike (mikesgoodreads) | 294 comments madrano wrote: "Mike wrote: "I think the first place was called Wild Oats Market. And they were bought out by WF. I'm not completely sure but I think that's right. One thing I do know is WF and NS are having or ha..."

Huh. I first came to Portland in 2000, spent a little time, moved on and then settled here around '05. So, I'm not real familiar with much before that.


madrano | 912 comments Thanks, Mike. I've been surfin' to locate the name & cannot come up with it. I guess i'll have to let it go. LOLing at myself & this quest. I feel i know more about the Portland whole food movement than i ever wanted to know.


deborah


message 234: by Alias Reader (last edited Nov 12, 2010 07:28AM) (new)

Alias Reader (AliasReader) | 8317 comments On my favorite NPR show, The Leonard Lopate Show, they mentioned a recipe for Basic No-Knead Bread. I thought I would share it with you.

*See the link for full comments and directions on the recipe. The formatting is better, too.

The Basic No-Knead Bread Recipe


ON TIMING:
This bread is incredibly simple and involves little labor, but your need to plan ahead. Although mixing takes almost no time, the first rise requires about 12 to 18 hours. Then you’ll need to shape the dough and let it rise for another 1 to 2 hours. The longer rise tends to result in a richer bread, but you need the patience and the schedule to do it. In any event, the shorter rise is acceptable too: Just pay attention to the signs of a good rise described in the recipes. A reminder: The visual cues – a bubbly surface with a darkened appearance – are key. Usually 18 hours is optimal. (Very cold weather exception: In the dead of the winter, when the dough will tend to rise more slowly, a longer period may be necessary, as much as 24 hours.)

After preheating the oven and the pot, you’ve got 30 minutes of covered baking, another 15 to 30 of uncovered baking, and about an hour of cooling. And, please, don’t gulp down that first slice. Think of the first bite as you would the first taste of a glass of wine: smell it (there should be that touch of maltiness), chew it slowly to appreciate its almost meaty texture, and sense where it came from in its hint of wheat. Enjoy it. You baked it, and you did a good job.

Yield: One 10-inch round loaf; 1 ¼ pounds

Equipment: A 4 ½ - to 5 ½ - quart heavy pot

Ingredients
Measure
Weight

Bread flour
3 cups
400 grams

Table salt
1 ¼ teaspoons
8 grams

Instant or other active dry yeast
¼ teaspoon
1 gram

Cool (55 to 65 degrees F) water
1 1/3 cups
300 grams

Wheat bran, cornmeal, or additional flour for dusting

In a medium bowl, stir together the flour, salt, and yeast. Add the water and, using a wooden spoon or your hand, mix until you have a wet, sticky dough, about 30 seconds. Make sure it’s really sticky to the touch; if it’s not, mix in another tablespoon or two of water. Cover the bowl with a plate, tea towel, or plastic wrap and let sit at room temperature (about 72 degrees F), out of direct sunlight, until the surface is dotted with bubbles and the dough is more than doubled in size. This will take a minimum of 12 hours and (my preference) up to 18 hours. This slow rise – fermentation – is the key to flavor.

When the first fermentation is complete, generously dust a work surface (a wooden or plastic board is fine) with flour. Use a bowl scraper or rubber spatula to scrape the dough out of the bowl in one piece. When you begin to pull the dough away from the bowl, it will cling in long, thin strands (this is the developed gluten), and it will be quite loose and sticky – do not add more flour. Use slightly floured hands or a bowl scraper or spatula to lift the edges of the dough in toward the center. Nudge and tuck in the edges of the dough to make it round.
Place a cotton or linen tea towel (not terry cloth, which tends to stick and may leave lint in the dough) or a large cloth napkin on your work surface and generously dust the cloth with wheat bran, cornmeal, or flour. Use your hands or a bowl scraper or a wooden spatula to gently lift the dough to cover it and place it in a warm, draft-free spot to rise for 1 to 2 hours. The dough is ready when it is almost doubled. If you gently poke it with your finger, making an indentation about ¼ inch deep, it should hold the impression. If it doesn’t, let it rise for another 15 minutes.

Half an hour before the end of the second rise, preheat the oven to 475 degrees F, with a rack in the lower third position, and place a covered 4 ½ to 5 ½- quart heavy pot in the center of the rack.
Using pot holders, carefully remove the preheated pot from the oven, and uncover it. Unfold the tea towel, lightly dust the dough with flour or bran, lift up the dough, either on the towel or in your hand, and quickly but gently invert it into the pot, seam side up. (Use caution – the pot will be very hot; see photos, page 55.) Cover the pot and bake for 20 minutes.

Remove the lid and continue baking until the bread is a deep, chestnut color but not burnt, 15 to 30 minutes more. Use a heatproof spatula or pot holders to carefully lift the bread out of the pot and place it on a rack to cool thoroughly. Don’t slice or tear into it until it has cooled, which usually takes at least an hour.


http://www.wnyc.org/shows/lopate/arti...


Alias Reader (AliasReader) | 8317 comments Low Calorie Pumpkin Bread from Hungry Girl


After getting a BAZILLION requests for pumpkin bread, we figured it was time to make some. And after EIGHT attempts, we got it just right. Try it and see!

Ingredients:
One 15-oz. can pure pumpkin
1 1/4 cups whole-wheat flour
1/4 cup all-purpose flour
1/2 cup fat-free liquid egg substitute (like Original Egg Beaters)
1/2 cup Splenda No Calorie Sweetener (granulated)
1/4 cup brown sugar (not packed)
1/4 cup Ocean Spray Craisins Original Sweetened Dried Cranberries (or regular raisins), chopped
2 1/4 tsp. baking powder
1 1/2 tsp. cinnamon
1 tsp. vanilla extract
1/2 tsp. salt
1/3 tsp. pumpkin pie spice

Directions:
Preheat oven to 350 degrees.

In a large bowl, combine both types of flour, Splenda, brown sugar, baking powder, cinnamon, salt, and pumpkin pie spice (in other words, all dry ingredients except for the Craisins or raisins).

In a medium bowl, mix together pumpkin, egg substitute, and vanilla extract (all the wet ingredients). Add this mixture to the bowl with the dry ingredients, and stir until just blended.

Slowly sprinkle chopped Craisins or raisins into the batter, making sure they don't all stick together, and mix to distribute them.

Spoon batter into a large loaf pan (about 9" X 5") sprayed with nonstick spray. Bake for about 50 minutes, until the top of the loaf is firm to the touch. (Bread may be moist inside. This doesn't mean it's undercooked.) Allow to cool, and then cut into 8 slices. Enjoy!

MAKES 8 SERVINGS

Serving Size: 1 (thick!) slice
Calories: 143
Fat: 0.5g
Sodium: 281mg
Carbs: 31g
Fiber: 4.5g
Sugars: 9g
Protein: 5g

POINTS® value 2*

http://www.hungry-girl.com/chew/chewd...


Linda | 126 comments Alias Reader wrote: "Low Calorie Pumpkin Bread from Hungry Girl


After getting a BAZILLION requests for pumpkin bread, we figured it was time to make some. And after EIGHT attempts, we got it just right. Try it and s..."



This sounds like a great recipe! But where's the chocolate chips? :)


message 237: by Alias Reader (last edited Nov 12, 2010 12:11PM) (new)

Alias Reader (AliasReader) | 8317 comments Linda wrote: .This sounds like a great recipe! But where's the chocolate chips? :) .."

------------------------------------

LOL
I hear ya, Linda. You are preaching to the choir girlfriend !

You are talking to a person who always keeps a bag of
Ghirardelli chocolate chips in the refrigerator for snacking. A few can really quiet those chocolate cravings. And the quality of the these chips is so worth the price.


Linda | 126 comments A girl after my own heart!


JoAnn/QuAppelle | 712 comments The most successful dieting experience I ever had was months at Weight Watchers. The night after my meeting I ate whatever I wanted and every night after dinner I let a Hershey's kiss melt in my mouth!


Linda | 126 comments JoAnn/QuAppelle wrote: "The most successful dieting experience I ever had was months at Weight Watchers. The night after my meeting I ate whatever I wanted and every night after dinner I let a Hershey's kiss melt in my mo..."

While thinking how sweet it is......


Alias Reader (AliasReader) | 8317 comments I usually allow myself one Dove Dark chocolate square with a cup of tea at night. It's my treat....my medicine. :)


message 242: by JoAnn/QuAppelle (last edited Dec 31, 2010 12:18PM) (new)

JoAnn/QuAppelle | 712 comments Due to GR's wonderful (NOT!) search engine, I cannot find Donna's post about the great roast beef her DH recently made. I told a friend about it, and he belongs to Cook's Online and was able to send me a pdf for this recipe. Here is is:

Grandma's Roast Beef with Gravy - Cook's Country

1 (4- to 5-pound) Boneless Top Round Roast, tied (see note below)
Salt and Pepper
1 Tablespoon Vegetable Oil
4 Tablespoons Unsalted Butter
2 Carrots, peeled and cut into 2-inch pieces
1 Onion, peeled and cut into 1⁄2-inch rounds
1 Celery Rib, cut into 2-inch pieces
1⁄2 cup all-purpose flour
1 teaspoon tomato paste
2 (10.5-ounce) cans beef consommé
1 1⁄2 Cups Water

1) SEASON MEAT Pat roast dry with paper towels and rub with 2 teaspoons salt. Wrap in plastic wrap and refrigerate at least 1 hour or up to 24 hours.

2) BROWN ROAST Adjust oven rack to middle position and heat oven to 225°F. Pat roast dry with paper towels and rub with 2 teaspoons pepper. Heat oil in ovensafe skillet over medium-high heat until just smoking. Brown roast all over, 8 to 12 minutes, transfer to plate.

3) ROAST BEEF Pour off all but 2 Tablespoons fat from pan. Add butter to skil- let and melt over medium heat. Cook carrots, onion, and celery until lightly browned, 6 to 8 minutes. Add flour and tomato paste and cook until flour is golden and paste begins to darken, about 2 minutes. Off heat, push vegetables to center of pan. Place meat on top of vegetables and transfer skillet to oven. Cook until meat registers 125°F (for medium-rare), 21⁄2 to 31⁄2 hours. Transfer roast to carving board, tent with foil, and let rest 20 minutes.

4) MAKE GRAVY Meanwhile, keeping in mind that handle will be hot, return skillet with vegetables to medium-high heat and cook, stirring occasionally, until vegetables are deep golden brown, about 5 minutes. Slowly whisk in consommé and water, scraping up any browned bits, and bring to boil. Re- duce heat to medium and simmer until thickened, 10 to 15 minutes. Strain gravy through fine mesh strainer into serving bowl; discard vegetables. Season with salt and pepper.

5) CARVE. Remove kitchen twine from roast. Thinly slice roast crosswise against grain. Serve with gravy.
Serves 6 to 8. For even deeper seasoning, refrigerate the salt-rubbed roast for 24 hours. You can substitute top sirloin for the top round. Look for an evenly shaped roast with a 1⁄4-inch fat cap. Tie kitchen twine in 1-inch intervals around the circumference of the meat.

Cook’s Country; January 2011


Linda | 126 comments I'm going to cook a pork loin roast with sauerkraut, onions, and caraway in my slow cooker for New Years Day.It's supposed to be for good luck! If not lucky, it sounded yummy!


Bobbie57 (bobbie572002) | 917 comments Linda wrote: "I'm going to cook a pork loin roast with sauerkraut, onions, and caraway in my slow cooker for New Years Day.It's supposed to be for good luck! If not lucky, it sounded yummy!"

Sounds luscious!!


Linda | 126 comments Let's hope so, I'll let you know!


JoAnn/QuAppelle | 712 comments Linda wrote: "I'm going to cook a pork loin roast with sauerkraut, onions, and caraway in my slow cooker for New Years Day.It's supposed to be for good luck! If not lucky, it sounded yummy!"

If it is as good as it sounds, I hope you post the recipe here.

How about the marinated black-eyed pea tradition?


Linda | 126 comments I tried that here a couple of years ago, it didn't go over very well....! :(
The recipe I'm making is from Lancaster County , a tradition in PA for the New Year. I'll definitely post it, if it turns out good!


message 248: by Alias Reader (last edited Dec 31, 2010 03:30PM) (new)

Alias Reader (AliasReader) | 8317 comments I would love to have some of that roast beef. I would have to have it with nice crusty Italian bread.

I like my roast beef on the rare side, in case you were thinking of inviting me over, JoAnn. :)


JoAnn/QuAppelle | 712 comments JoAnn/QuAppelle wrote: "Linda wrote: "I'm going to cook a pork loin roast with sauerkraut, onions, and caraway in my slow cooker for New Years Day.It's supposed to be for good luck! If not lucky, it sounded yummy!"

If it..."


Linda, I live near Lancaster County......several churches around here have pork and sauerkraut dinners on New Year's day, as fundraisers.

Don't rush to get on the train, Alias, but I will let you know!


Donna in Southern Maryland (Cedarville922) | 212 comments That Roast Beef comes out a beautiful pink Alias. It IS SO GOOD! Thanks for finding the recipe JoAnn. It's a keeper!

Donna


back to top