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Lisa Anne | 617 comments The Girl with the Dragon Tattoo

Mikael Blomkvist, a financial journalist who has just been found guilty of libel and is currently out of work is offered a job by Henrik Vanger, the once CEO of the powerful (if now in troubled) Vanger Corporation. Henrik's favorite family member, and who he loved like his own daughter, disappeared in the 1960s and he has hired Mikael to find her murderer among his crazy family.

Lisbeth Salander, a troubled, genius hacker (and the girl with the dragon tattoo)is brought in to assist M...more Mikael Blomkvist, a financial journalist who has just been found guilty of libel and is currently out of work is offered a job by Henrik Vanger, the once CEO of the powerful (if now in troubled) Vanger Corporation. Henrik's favorite family member, and who he loved like his own daughter, disappeared in the 1960s and he has hired Mikael to find her murderer among his crazy family.

Lisbeth Salander, a troubled, genius hacker (and the girl with the dragon tattoo)is brought in to assist Mikael "researching" the members of the Vanger clan.

It is an intriguing mystery, that definitely keeps the reader guessing. However, this novel is more than just your generic mystery novel. It has many intriguing side characters with their own back story and by the end I didn't feel as if the main characters had finished growing and there life would essentially remain the same once the book ended. It also had some very interesting ideas about moral relativism and some informative, hard hitting and occasionally graphic scenes on abuse towards women.

All in all a very good read and I would have given it 5 stars except the lead in to the book had more financial/business explanation than I would have liked. Not that I think it should have been cut out, just moved a little bit father into the book.


Lisa Anne | 617 comments Girl Sleuth Nancy Drew and the Women Who Created Her
[close:] I loved The Nancy Drew Files of the 80s, with Nancy and her blue mustang. While this is not the original or iconic Nancy Drew (which I did read some of later on) I give Nancy Drew and Carolyn Keene a lot of credit for my current love and obsession with books, so obviously when I saw this book chronically Nancy's creation and rise to fame I had to pick it up.

Girl Sleuth, details how Nancy Drew was created by Edward Stratemeyer and fully realized by her two main others Harriet Stratemeyer and Mildred Wirt. The tale begins with Edward Stratemeyer who founds the Stratemeyer Syndicate, which produced such stories as The Hardy Boys, The Bobsey Twins and of course Nancy Drew (although Edward only lived through 4 of these books). While I realize this was where Nancy Drew was born I thought a little less detail could have gone into some of Edward's back story, which dragged at some points. Once Rehak got to the actual birth and development of Nancy Drew though I was thoroughly enthralled with the book. She does a wonderful job of working Nancy and her writers into the reincarnations of feminism that have gone on through the life of Nancy Drew.


Lisa Anne | 617 comments If You Could See Me Now
"If you Could See Me Now" is written similarly to Ahern's "A Place Called Here." Both of these novels insert a bit of childhood fantasy into everyday life. "If You Could See Me Now" explores the idea that imaginary friends might be invisible to the outside world, but they are far from imaginary. I found the concept to be interesting, but in reading the novel I had a hard time accepting that a straight laced grown woman had an "imaginary friend" that no one else could see, basically at time making her seem a little crazy. Kids talking to no one = normal, adults doing the same thing = psychiatrist needed. However, I did enjoy the fact that Ivan (the imaginary friend) didn't just sweep in and make everything in life better. In the end not much had truly changed in Elizabeth's life except for her disposition, but this makes all the difference.


Lisa Anne | 617 comments The Crimson Petal and the White

'The Crimson Petal and the White' begins by addressing the reader and introducing you to the drudges of victorian England. You then work your way up along with the different characters of the book. The reader hits on Sugar early on, who is a prostitute given a chance to move up in English society through William Rackham. Rackham, the unhappy heir to a soap and perfume company, has an unhappy homelife, with a wife who is slowly going crazy. He begins as a client of Sugar's, but eventually brings her into his home as his young daughter's governess.

The beginning of this book sucked me into the story, but as I got about half way through I didn't really want to be there anymore. The narrator's side conversations with the reader, which I found interesting and unique, slowly disappear, and the book, which is 900 or so pages, definitely begins to drag. Also, while I appreciate that victorian London was not always a particularly pretty and clean place, and I liked that Faber went into the crude and the vulgar occasionally it was just overkill on the whole thing.



Lisa Anne | 617 comments The Guernsey Literary and Potato Peel Pie Society

The Guernsey Literary and Potato Peel Pie Society begins just as World War II had ended. Juliet Ashton, a columnist who wrote amusing articles during the war is just finishing up a book tour when she receives a letter from the Channel island of Guernsey mentioning the title society and its role in their lives during the Nazi occupation. After delving into the world of The Guernsey Literary and Potato Peel Pie Society through letters Juliet travels to Guernsey to meet the people who's lives she has practically become a part of.

This book had an interesting perspective into World War II and the aftermath for those who had to get try and get on with their lives. The author did a wonderful job of making the characters come to life even though the entire story was told through letters. Also, for those, like myself, who love almost anything having to do with literature the book has an additional level of interest. Since the main character is a writer and the rest are part of a literary society of course there are many discussions on books, not only on analysing the books, but also gaining a new insight a characters by what they choose to read, why and how they react to what they read.

All in all a a great read that I flew through, but still had plenty of substance.


Lisa Anne | 617 comments Vanishing Acts A Novel

I had toyed with buying a Jodi Picoult book for years. I would see one read the back cover, think it sounded really interesting, but ultimately I would put it down in favor of another. When I finally did buy and read one of her books I realized I probably shoud have gone with "the other one".

I've heard so many people rave about her, but I just can't see it.
I was never able to really care for any of the characters, which made all the 'big' (and fairly obvious) events fall flat.


Lisa Anne | 617 comments The Kite Runner

The first half of this book was amazing. I was engrossed in Amir's life in Afghanistan and his relationship with Hassan and his father. However, when Amir and his father moved to the United States I thought the story became less vivid. Many of the characters that were brought in at this point seemed slightly one dimensional, including Amir and his wife. The story did pick again once Amir traveled back to Afghanistan. All in all though I thought it was a good read and would definitely recommend it.


J.D. Stroube | 2393 comments Mod
Lisa Anne wrote: "The Kite Runner

The first half of this book was amazing. I was engrossed in Amir's life in Afghanistan and his relationship with Hassan and his father. However, when Amir and his fa..."


I still haven't read it, but it is sitting on my bookshelf...




Stephanie (OntarioGal) | 47 comments Lisa Anne wrote: "The Kite Runner

The first half of this book was amazing. I was engrossed in Amir's life in Afghanistan and his relationship with Hassan and his father. However, when Amir and his fa..."


I'm just starting this one. I will let you know if I find the same thing.



stormhawk | 1175 comments Lisa Anne wrote: "The Guernsey Literary and Potato Peel Pie Society"

I adored this book. I went camping with friends last year, one of whom manages a chain bookstore. She came to the campsite with a massive bag of books, and started handing them around based on her knowledge of each of the people, and each of the books.

She picked this one for me, and I ended up completely enchanted by it! It's not a book that I would have selected for myself, way off the edges of what I ordinarily read, but her choice was absolutely dead on.




wfpoppet | 143 comments stormhawk wrote: "Lisa Anne wrote: "The Guernsey Literary and Potato Peel Pie Society"

I adored this book. I went camping with friends last year, one of whom manages a chain bookstore. She came to ..."


I've come across this book in a couple of different places. It seems like it could be hit or miss, but the reviews I've read from more trusted sources on GR make me think it would be worth my time. Thanks to both of you for the additional 'votes' in favor.


Dot | 27 comments You can have another vote in favour from me !

It was a really interesting perspective on the war.


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