Audiobooks discussion

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Currently reading thread - Summer/Autumn 2009

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message 1: by John, Moderator (new)

John | 3294 comments Mod
I'm starting a new thread at this point as the old one's gotten rather lengthy.

I'm about 3/4 of the way through Ghost Train to the Eastern Star by Paul Theroux - he's much more likeable in this one than in his previous book (Dark Star Safari). Narration by John McDonough (a/k/a George Guidall) took some getting used to, but is pretty well done, capturing Theroux's sense of humor - and crankiness - well.




message 2: by bup (last edited Jul 08, 2009 02:16PM) (new)

bup | 34 comments Adam Bede by George Eliot (Maryann Evans). It's narrated by Nadia May, and she has the workmen's accents down.


message 3: by Cathy (new)

Cathy | 77 comments Has anyone listened to Lavinia by Ursula K. Le Guin
Narrated by Alyssa Bresnahan? I'm considering it for my next audible purchase.


message 4: by John, Moderator (new)

John | 3294 comments Mod
Not that book, but I can vouch for the narrator as being pretty good.


message 5: by Jessica (new)

Jessica | 38 comments Currently listening to What is the What by Dave Eggers, read by Dion Graham. I'm getting close to the last few cd's and have loved it from the beginning. The narration is wonderful.


message 6: by Julie (new)

Julie (JulieMoncton) | 19 comments I just finished Suzanne Collins' book The Hunger Games and I'm adding it to my 'favorites of 2009'. The setting for this speculative fiction title is a future where different regions of the United States have to offer a boy and a girl teenager as tribute to the ruling government. The tributes from all of the territories participate in the Hunger Games - a reality show 'Survivor' game, but the losers don't get voted off the game ... they get killed. This book is enjoyable on so many different levels. The plot is fast and gripping (plan to stay up late listening to this one). But the story also raises some very good ethical questions and makes some subtle comments about our fascination with reality tv shows. The audio version is great - wonderful narration by Carolyn McCormick. And the best news yet? There is a sequel - Catching Fire - due out in September - can't wait!





message 7: by Laurin (new)

Laurin (Scylla) | 20 comments Just finishing up Blasphemy by Douglas Preston--I have about a half hour left to go! Then I've got Cemetery Dance by Douglas Preston and Lincoln Child ready after that.

*adds The Hunger Games to my list* Thanks, Julie!


message 8: by Laura (new)

Laura (QuestionableAdvice) | 12 comments Miss Pettigrew Lives for a Day, narrated by the actress Frances McDormand. I was a bit put off by the narration at first - it's very lively - but I'm enjoying the story and now the style seems more natural.


message 9: by Lori (new)

Lori (twizzle777) | 221 comments I am currently listening to Fire Lover by Joseph Wambaugh. It's read by Ken Howard. The topic is very interesting. The narration reminds me a lot of the old Dragnet show.


message 10: by Lori (new)

Lori (twizzle777) | 221 comments I also just finished Fair Weather by Richard Peck and read by Estelle Parsons. I recommend ANYTHING by Richard Peck. They are listed as "Young Adult" but the stories are fabulous.


message 11: by John (new)

John Grace (johngrace) | 5 comments I'm listening to Jim Butcher's Small Favor right now, just finished David Webbers On Basalisk station, and will Start Hyperion when I'm done with this one.




message 12: by Grumpus, Hearing aide (last edited Jul 31, 2009 06:30AM) (new)

Grumpus | 339 comments Mod
I'm listening to Washington's Crossing and find it outstanding...I took a little break from history but I'm glad I'm back on topic.


message 13: by John, Moderator (new)

John | 3294 comments Mod
I'm listening to Renegade by Richard Wolffe. I had trouble getting into the first couple of hours, which were an overview of Obama's election day activities up until the networks called the race, followed by biographical info on him, Michelle, and others in the campaign. At the 3-hr point now, and the 2007 campaigning in Iowa has begun gearing up, with 13 more hours to go. Here's hoping for more behind-the-scenes political details, and less biographical focus (esp on minor players).


message 14: by Cathy (last edited Jul 13, 2009 11:26PM) (new)

Cathy | 77 comments Julie at All Ears wrote: "I just finished Suzanne Collins' book The Hunger Games and I'm adding it to my 'favorites of 2009'. The setting for this speculative fiction title is a future where different regions of the United..."

Thanks for the tip - I bought the book and enjoyed it immensely. It does appeal on many levels and the ending was thoughtful.



message 15: by Julie (new)

Julie (JulieMoncton) | 19 comments Cathy wrote: "Julie at All Ears wrote: "I just finished Suzanne Collins' book The Hunger Games and I'm adding it to my 'favorites of 2009'. The setting for this speculative fiction title is a future where diffe..."

Cathy - so glad you enjoyed it! Can't wait for the sequel - I think it comes out in September.




message 16: by Lori (new)

Lori (twizzle777) | 221 comments I am now listening to I, Robot by Isaac Asimov and read by Scott Brick. Excellent and nothing at all like the movie. I do think it's better to see the movie and then read the book. I don't get so cranky during the movie that way.


message 17: by Dung Beetle (last edited Jul 16, 2009 06:18AM) (new)

Dung Beetle (DungBeetle) I’m listening to Robert Cormier’s The Chocolate War. It seems overly dramatic and outdated, what with everyone shaking in their shoes about The Vigils, a boys club that doesn’t seem to do anything but prank people, and classfuls of teenage boys that tremble when the teacher gives them a dirty look. I know this is all supposed to whip up into something dark, so I’ll wait and see, but at this point my eyes ache from rolling.
Also, is it too much to ask that someone actually EAT some chocolate in this book?! :)



message 18: by Katie (new)

Katie (cowgirl-up) | 42 comments I just finished Cooked: My Journey from the Streets to the Stove by Jeff Henderson. I'm really not sure why I continued beyond the 1st CD.


message 19: by Jessica (new)

Jessica | 38 comments Dung wrote: "I’m listening to Robert Cormier’s The Chocolate War. It seems overly dramatic and outdated, what with everyone shaking in their shoes about The Vigils, a boys club that doesn’t seem to do anything..."

You just CRACKED me up with you eyes aching from rolling!!!!!


message 20: by Karima (new)

Karima | 9 comments Katie,
I felt the same way about Jeff Henderson's Cooked:My Journey from the Streets to the Stove. I couldn't stomach it and didn't get much beyond the first disc.


message 21: by Dung Beetle (new)

Dung Beetle (DungBeetle) Jessica, The Chocolate War's not getting any better...I ditched it for good today. My eyes feel better already.



message 22: by Marius (new)

Marius van Blerck | 27 comments If you want something a little unusual, try Haruki Murakami. His "Kafka on the Shore", which I recently listened to, is not a bad one to start with. It involves a sequence of strangely linked events influence the coming of age of a teenage Japanese boy. The language is graceful, and the story strangely compelling. Sean Barrett and Oliver Le Sueur read the story with empathy.


message 23: by Jonathan (new)

Jonathan Marius wrote: "If you want something a little unusual, try Haruki Murakami. His "Kafka on the Shore", which I recently listened to, is not a bad one to start with. It involves a sequence of strangely linked event..."

Marius-
Your comment about Murakami led me to check my library's audiobook collection again. They now have several of his on audio, and I put a request in for Kafka on the Shore. I have only listened to his Norwegian Wood so far, which I hear that is atypical of his work. Thanks for the suggestion.

I am currently listening to Joseph Conrad's Lord Jim (Recorded Books) for the second time. Steven Crossley does a great job, especially with the many accents required by the text.


message 24: by William (new)

William | 32 comments Marius wrote: "If you want something a little unusual, try Haruki Murakami. His "Kafka on the Shore", which I recently listened to, is not a bad one to start with. It involves a sequence of strangely linked event..."

I enjoyed reading his "The Wind-Up Bird Chronicle" which is also off the beaten path an involve a sequence of strangely linked events. I wonder if some of his characters represent Arcetypes.




message 25: by Marius (last edited Jul 22, 2009 02:09AM) (new)

Marius van Blerck | 27 comments Hi William - Murakami's principal character in most of his books tends to be a young man who tends not to fit in well with the society around him, who has a tendency to drift into mystical happenings. This similarity does not detract from the books - it is simply what interests Murakami, and he has woven some amazing books around this theme. If you read or listen to his books end-to-end, this common factor might cloy a bit, which is why I tend to leave about 3 to 6 months between his books.



message 26: by Jessica (new)

Jessica (bitsy55) | 1 comments I'm listening to The Gargoyle. Very captivating but also distribing in some places. I'm not to sure about the narrator....but he is growing on me.


message 27: by John, Moderator (new)

John | 3294 comments Mod
I'm about 25% into Piano in the Pyrenees by Tony Hawks (read by the author), finding it mundane, and at times mildly juvenile, but not "bad"; it works okay to fill time. Doubt I'll be trying his other books though.


message 28: by Katie (new)

Katie (cowgirl-up) | 42 comments I'm 3/7 disks into The No. 1 Ladies' Detective Agency by Alexander McCall Smith. So far, not really a fan.

Wasn't this book a bestseller for a long time? I know it's the first out of about a bajillion book series. I can't figure out why for either thing. The writing is pretty bad.


message 29: by John, Moderator (new)

John | 3294 comments Mod
I could see folks thinking it's corny/hokey. I didn't start listening to the audio until several books later, and am not as big a fan of the narrator as others are.


message 30: by Katie (last edited Jul 24, 2009 07:58AM) (new)

Katie (cowgirl-up) | 42 comments I don't know that I'd call it corny/hokey as much as I just think the writing is weak.

I'm also not a big fan of the narrator. Maybe I should try the 2nd book from the series in print.


message 31: by Jessica (new)

Jessica | 38 comments Currently listening to Pompeii by Robert Harris, narrated by John Lee. It's interesting, but not the kind of book that keeps me on my toes. Although, I think I'd enjoy anything read by John Lee.


message 32: by Barbara (new)

Barbara | 250 comments John, I'm currently listening to Ghost Train to the Eastern Star by Paul Theroux. I agree that John McDonough sounds a lot like George Guidall, but he has a pretty convincing profile on the Recorded Books website -- http://recordedbooks.com/index.cfm?fu...


message 33: by Katie (new)

Katie (cowgirl-up) | 42 comments I just started Inkheart during my commute yesterday. Very enjoyable so far.


message 34: by John, Moderator (new)

John | 3294 comments Mod
Barbara wrote: "John, I'm currently listening to Ghost Train to the Eastern Star by Paul Theroux. I agree that John McDonough sounds a lot like George Guidall, but he has a pretty convincing profile on the Record..."

As the story progressed I had my doubts they were definitely the same, but they sure sound a lot alike - amazingly so!


message 35: by Rachel (new)

Rachel (wildhoney) | 2 comments I am currently listening to, and thoroughly enjoying, The Guernsey Literary and Potato Peel Pie Society. The book itself takes the form of several letters being read which seems like it would be a disaster for an audiobook, but it really works.


message 36: by Ginny (new)

Ginny (ginnyky) | 1 comments I’m listening to The Tortilla Curtain by T.C. Boyle, read by the author. It’s my first Overdrive Media download from the digital branch of my local library. I transferred to my MP3 player with no problems. I’m on chapter two and I’m enjoying the book.


message 37: by Lori (new)

Lori (twizzle777) | 221 comments I've gotten hooked on the Jack Reacher books by Lee Child. I'm currently listening to #3, Tripwire.


message 38: by Sandra (new)

Sandra (sanddune) The Guernsey Literary and Potato Peel Pie Society was one of my favorite audio books ( I used CD) this year.
Author died just before completing so no hope of sequel. Agree with Rachel that it works and works well.


message 39: by Katie (new)

Katie (cowgirl-up) | 42 comments Rachel wrote: "I am currently listening to, and thoroughly enjoying, The Guernsey Literary and Potato Peel Pie Society. The book itself takes the form of several letters being read which seems like..."

This was one of the best audios I've ever listened to.


message 40: by Jessica (last edited Aug 19, 2009 10:53PM) (new)

Jessica | 38 comments I'm 1 CD aways from finishing Neil Gaiman's Stardust, read by the author. I'm really enjoying it! A fairy tale for adults!


message 41: by Lara (new)

Lara (LaraSue) | 26 comments Jessica wrote: "I'm 1 CD aways from finishing Neil Gaiman's Stardust, read by the author. I'm really enjoying it! A fairy tale for adults!"

I have heard that's really good.

I am re-reading the Wheel of Time series read by Michael Kramer and Kate Reading.




message 42: by Jessica (new)

Jessica | 38 comments Finished Stardust...LOVED it!!! Now I'm listening to and loving The Hunger Games by Suzanne Collins ,read by Someone McCormick. I'm using one of those Playaway devices to hear it. It's my new favorite way to listen to books. I can walk for hours just listening to it! (Ok, 2 hrs max). I would do the IPOD thing, but the IPOD downloadable choices from my library are slim and I don't have the patience to transfer from CDs.


message 43: by Lori (new)

Lori (twizzle777) | 221 comments I am finishing The Friday Night Knitting Club by by Kate Jacobs. It's been pretty good. The main character annoys me at times. I was almost ready to quit last night. Next up is the new Derek Landy book, The Faceless Ones. I loved his other two books.


message 44: by John, Moderator (new)

John | 3294 comments Mod
I'm listening to Free Air by Sinclair Lewis - the narrator is good, but his continuous tone of boyish enthusiasm means I can't listen for long stretches.


message 45: by Katie (new)

Katie (cowgirl-up) | 42 comments I'm 1/2 way through The Silver Chair by C.S. Lewis. I read the entire series in middle school, but decided to re-"read" them on audio this year. I think I actually like them better this way!


message 46: by Jim (new)

Jim (Takchess) | 14 comments Hi new member here. Mostly Nonfiction listener on a commute.

I am currently listening to this

How We Decide

Not fantastic but listenable.

Two books I read and really enjoyed but could not get the BOT quick enough from the library.Both I expect would be very good Audiobooks. The Strain was a very engaging Vampire book.

shop class as soul craft an inquiry into the value of work

The Strain


message 47: by John, Moderator (new)

John | 3294 comments Mod
Welcome, Jim!

I listen to (and read) a fair amount of non-fiction myself. I've noticed "shop class" around, so thanks for recommending it.


message 48: by Jessica (new)

Jessica | 38 comments Listening to The World According to Garpby John Irving. So far so good!


message 49: by Blackbird (new)

Blackbird Pie (blackbirdpie) | 8 comments The Shifting Fog by Kate Morton. I really like the narrator's voice on some words, her accent can make the word "no" sound really intriguing.



message 50: by Wendy T (new)

Wendy T Jessica wrote: "Listening to The World According to Garpby John Irving. So far so good!"

I need to look into getting this book on Audio. I'll check the library today to see they have it in.


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