The American Civil War discussion

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message 1: by pete (last edited Mar 24, 2009 06:55AM) (new)

pete | 26 comments A couple of the other groups I read have trivia questions and a running quiz that I get a kick out of. Just wondered if that would be something the group would enjoy? On one group a poster will ask a question and whoever gets the answer first will post a question to keep it going. The other group just keeps the thread open to whoever wants to post a trivia question or whatever.

here's a trivia question:

How much money did the civil war cost the u.s. government each day?



message 2: by pete (last edited Mar 30, 2009 12:27PM) (new)

pete | 26 comments hi all,

well nobody bit on the last post or came up with the answer to the question. in case anyone was interested, the answer to the last question is:

according to a report released by the u.s. congress in 1863, the financial cost of fighting the war was $2.5 million dollars a day.

let me try a different question:

what was the name of the union soldier who found r. e. lee's famous 'lost order' during the antietam campaign?


message 3: by CJ (new)

CJ Bro (Backfence) | 15 comments Hi Pete: Is this to encourage research or can we only respond if we already know the answer? I confess to having looked it up, but I did learn something! I'll leave off answering in case you want to save it for all those walking encyclopedias out there.

Instead, I'll submit another trivia question: What state boasted two state capitals during the civil war - one USA and one CSA; and what were those two capitals?

CJ


message 4: by pete (new)

pete | 26 comments hi cj,
thanks for your response! i think of this as a fun thread where anyone can toss in an answer and hopefully enjoy posting another question. by all means do answer the question if you'd like. sometimes knowing the answer might be posted by someone else quicker makes it fun to get the thread heated up and interesting.



message 5: by pete (new)

pete | 26 comments i've been trying to think of what the answer to cj's question would be...could it be refering to richmond va. and charleston w.v. when it was still considered western virginia?


message 6: by CJ (new)

CJ Bro (Backfence) | 15 comments OK, then. First Sergeant John M. Bloss, altho' from what I'm reading, he was one of a group of four and one of the others saw it, but Bloss was the one curious enough to question what it was and, later, realize its value. Interesting story, Pete. I'm glad you brought it up.

As for my own question, good guess, but you're on the wrong side of the country (countries, at the time). It's was a state with very split allegiances. I'll leave it out there a little longer before giving the answer, but feel free to Google. :-)





message 7: by Karen (new)

Karen To CJ's question, I believe the answer is Missouri and I'll guess Springfield and St. Louis as the competing capitals.


message 8: by CJ (new)

CJ Bro (Backfence) | 15 comments Missouri is correct, Karen. But the state capitals were Jefferson City (same as today) for the Union, and Neosho, MO as capital for the confederacy. Even though technically a Union state, southern sentiments ran so strong in Missouri that both sides claimed the state and there was actually a star on the Confederate flag representing Missouri.

A good book to read on the subject (nonfiction)is:
Inside War: The Guerrilla Conflict in Missouri during the American Civil War by Michael Fellman.

CJ


message 9: by pete (new)

pete | 26 comments hi all,

thanks for the question and the book reference, cj. i've seen it mentioned before and now i have to put it on my to-read list...

karen, please feel free to come up with a question if you'd like. if not just let us know and we'll post another. good job!

bye now.


message 10: by pete (new)

pete | 26 comments just for fun, here's another question:

Bloody Pond, the Peach Orchard, Hell's Hollow and the Hornet's Nest were all landmarks of which major civil war battle?


message 11: by Valerie (new)

Valerie I know there was a Peach Orchard at Gettysburg, but I don't believe it had the rest of the landmarks.


message 12: by CJ (new)

CJ Bro (Backfence) | 15 comments Shiloh


message 13: by pete (new)

pete | 26 comments cj, you got it...your turn!


message 14: by CJ (new)

CJ Bro (Backfence) | 15 comments I'm thinkin'. I'm thinkin'. :-)

I'll get back to you.

CJ


message 15: by Karen (new)

Karen Okay, here's the next question:

Who saved Robert Todd Lincoln's life when he fell between the train and the platform at the Jersey City, N.J. train station on April 2, 1865?


message 16: by CJ (new)

CJ Bro (Backfence) | 15 comments Cool question. Another research project. :)


message 17: by pete (new)

pete | 26 comments oh yeh, i remember that...but trying to call to mind who it was...thinking...


message 18: by pete (new)

pete | 26 comments oh ofcourse...i saw a thing on lincoln's assasination and the chase for j. w. booth on the history channel last week. one of the things mentioned was this event... it was j. w.'s older brother edwin who saved robert at the train platform!


message 19: by pete (new)

pete | 26 comments heres a question:

who made this rather unforgettable statement?:

"I failed, I failed, and that is about all that can be said about it"?




message 20: by Karen (new)

Karen That is correct, Pete. It's such a strange turn of events that Edwin Booth saved Robert Lincoln's life about two weeks before Edwin's brother killed Robert's father.

On to the next question. :)


message 21: by CJ (new)

CJ Bro (Backfence) | 15 comments To Pete re the "I failed" quote. Wasn't that Robert E. Lee?


message 22: by pete (new)

pete | 26 comments hi cj,
i think you might be refering to r.e. lee's poignant comments to the soldiers as they were leaving the battleground following gettysburg, but no; my quote was from a different person on a different occasion. here's a hint tho...my quote has an interesting ironic note to it.


message 23: by pete (new)

pete | 26 comments still no answer to the last question...here's a hint:

it has something to do with gettysburg.


message 24: by [deleted user] (new)

Longstreet, perhaps? After Pickett's charge?


message 25: by pete (new)

pete | 26 comments no, sorry jordan, good guess but no... actually if you guys haven't heard this story i think you'll get a kick out of it.

let me know if you want the answer...


message 26: by Karen (new)

Karen I'd like to hear the answer.


message 27: by pete (new)

pete | 26 comments ok, here's the answer:

it was Lincoln using these self-critical words to dismiss his Gettysburg Address moments after having delivered it. the previous orator, Edward Everett had spoken for the better part of two hours. Lincoln stood and delivered his address in about two minutes. history has proven which was the greatest!


message 28: by pete (new)

pete | 26 comments ok, here's another question? who was the first soldier killed in the civil war?


message 29: by Karen (new)

Karen I'm still floored by the answer to the last question. Isn't it amazing that Lincoln thought his address had failed. Amazing.


message 30: by Joe (new)

Joe (Blues) | 14 comments pete wrote: "ok, here's another question? who was the first soldier killed in the civil war?"

Wasn't it Elmer Ellsworth, or something like that?




message 31: by Joe (last edited Apr 07, 2009 10:22AM) (new)

Joe (Blues) | 14 comments ok, I have a question for everyone...
Who suggested to Lincoln to use Arlington as a "field of honor?"

Here's a hint... This person wasn't part of his cabinet.


message 32: by pete (new)

pete | 26 comments joe, nice guess but not the right person. it was actually before that event.


message 33: by pete (new)

pete | 26 comments hi all,

i know that mcdowell put the army there on the estate with a field hospital and two forts. it was general meigs who actually started burying dead soldiers on the grounds. from what i researched, there was bad blood between meigs and lee and meigs was determined to try forcing the lees from ever returning to the estate. the lees never returned.


message 34: by Joe (last edited Apr 07, 2009 01:43PM) (new)

Joe (Blues) | 14 comments pete wrote: "joe, nice guess but not the right person. it was actually before that event."

Did the person your thinking of die from a self-inflicted explosion out on Fort Sumter?

I know Elmer died after removing a confederate flag from someplace. The owner saw what was happening and shot him during the escape.



message 35: by Joe (new)

Joe (Blues) | 14 comments pete wrote: "hi all,

i know that mcdowell put the army there on the estate with a field hospital and two forts. it was general meigs who actually started burying dead soldiers on the grounds. from what i r..."


Yes, it was Meigs... And I thought that question was going to be too hard.



message 36: by pete (new)

pete | 26 comments <

Did the person your thinking of die from a self-inflicted explosion out on Fort Sumter...

hi Joe,

you're pretty close! private Daniel Hough, a member of the Federal garrison at Fort Sumter, was accidently killed by an exploding cannon during the evacuation ceremonies...the first combat soldier to die in the civil war.



message 37: by pete (new)

pete | 26 comments here's another question:

which side suffered more battle deaths? the north or the south?



message 38: by [deleted user] (new)

North.


message 39: by George (new)

George | 79 comments Ellsworth was a colonel commanding a Zouave regiment. he entered a house flying a Confederate flag in Alexandria, and got shot by the owner for his trouble.

I'd guess North as well in sheer numbers, as they had a lot more troops to begin with.


message 40: by pete (new)

pete | 26 comments jordan and george,

you are both right. estimated battle deaths for the north were 110,000 compared to 94,000 for the south.

your turn for a question...;)



message 41: by [deleted user] (new)

Wait, I thought that the total deaths for the entire war was closer to 600,000?


message 42: by George (new)

George | 79 comments Combat deaths vs deaths for all causes. disease took a huge number in an era without immunizations.


message 43: by [deleted user] (new)

True. Thanks.


message 44: by George (new)

George | 79 comments What was Sherman doing just before the war started?


message 45: by Joe (new)

Joe (Blues) | 14 comments George wrote: "What was Sherman doing just before the war started? "

Wasn't he in New Orleans. I don't remember what for...


message 46: by George (new)

George | 79 comments Lousiana is correct. but in what capacity? I'll wait a bit longer to see if there are any bites.


message 47: by George (new)

George | 79 comments He was the first superintendent of the Louisiana State Seminary of Learning & Military Academy which later became LSU.


message 48: by Terry (new)

Terry Holmes | 10 comments Ok..since I am new to the site, I have one for you. What is Ulysses S. Grant's real name?


message 49: by George (new)

George | 79 comments Ulysses Grant.


message 50: by Terry (new)

Terry Holmes | 10 comments But what was his real first name?


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