To Kill a Mockingbird To Kill a Mockingbird discussion


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Jasmine Caughman Good Reads

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message 1: by Jasmine (last edited Jan 23, 2013 10:28AM) (new)

Jasmine I read the book To Kill a Mockingbird. And I really enjoyed it. If i had to rate it i would give it 4 stars. This book has a big impact on its audience because it teaches you how to accept people for who they are. As you are reading this book you will get to see appearance vs. reality. As the people read this book they will learn life lessons throughout it.
In this world people are judged daily and sometimes it affects people more then we think. As you read this book people get to see the inside view of how it feels to be judged. In this book their is a character named boo and the children in the neighborhood think that he is such ann evil man but it says in the text "Boo will be transformed from a nightmare villain into a human being, and the children’s understanding of him will reflect their own journey toward adulthood." this is an indication that although people judge eventually they try and see people for who they really are. Another example from the text is when Jem's judgement of Mrs Dubose. He thought she was just mean but she really had an addiction to morphine.
If people are to read this book I do believe that there will be an lasting value, eventually. This book will have a lasting value because it will be able to teach younger children about discrimination and judgemental things. So this book can be used in schools to teach lessons, so that they can be used when kids reach adulthood. Although this book can have lasting value , it is truly up to the people in this world to make it have that. If we decide that this book teaches us or anyone else nothing then it will just be thrown in the back with other books that could have had potential, to teach us many lessons. If it was up to me everyone should read this book. The value and impact on this book is bigger then we will ever realize. Everyday you see people getting judged. why ? because no one really knows how not to judge others and if we are taught or if we actually can see how if hurts people i believe things will change. So yes, this book might have lasting value depending on who hands it land in or what mind reads this.


Kressel Housman I see you're new here, so let me explain. Mostly, these boards are for book discussions. Personal reviews like the one you posted are for your personal shelves. So what you do is 1) click on the book (ie To Kill A Mockingbird 2) mark it as "read" (GoodReads may want you to mark it as "want to read" first, so then you'll switch over) 3) use your mouse to fill in as many stars as you like and 4) add your review.

I hope that's clear. Let me know if you have trouble.


Nichola Kressel wrote: "I see you're new here, so let me explain. Mostly, these boards are for book discussions. Personal reviews like the one you posted are for your personal shelves. So what you do is 1) click on the bo..."

I don't know, I think the OP brings up some interesting comments which could lead to a similarly interesting discussion. I find a lot of the threads on the discussion boards to be quite vapid at the minute :( At least the OP shows some passion for what she has read.


Kressel Housman I'll bite. But it seems almost redundant to say this book will have lasting value as it's 50 years old and was awarded "Novel of the 20th Century" by the ALA.


Nichola In the UK, it's taught as a set text in English Literature classes partly because of the moral value beneath it. At least one further generation will be familiar with it and some of them will love it as much as many people in my generation. Surely any book which teaches tolerance has a lasting value for as long as people are reading it? Whether it will ever make status as a classic remains to be seen I suppose.


Jeni Interesting. I never really liked this book, personally. I didn't HATE it, but it's more on my "meh" list.

I'm completely okay with being in the minority on this and thousands of people wouldn't love it for no reason! It's just not a huge favorite of mine.

It's quite possible I learned my lessons elsewhere or didn't connect for any number of other reasons to this book. It could be I was too far removed from this type of thing to be sensible to the lessons inherent in the story.

It's a mystery!

I'm glad you enjoyed it, Jasmine! Reading is awesome!


Nichola It's set in an era that I love to read about so regardless of it's popularity, it was probably always going to be a winner for me :)


Shelley Nichola, I of course agree with you about the era in which the book is set. There's something about the 1930's--a melancholy, partly about being between two wars, and partly because it was a time when Americans had to learn to live without.

Shelley
Rain: A Dust Bowl Story
http://dustbowlstory.wordpress.com


message 9: by [deleted user] (new)

Despite certain misgivings that I mentioned in my notes on having recently read the book, I liked it, and believe that it's appeal will be long lasting. I'm not sure that "I love" to read about this era - for me it is more that I am ashamed "not to" see how prejudiced we used to be, and wonder what today's prejudices are, as seen by future generations.

I liked the original poster's review of the book, but wondered if anyone thinks, like me, that it is a bit optimistic? Do human's ever really learn from lessons? Some do, most don't.


Nichola Andy wrote: "Despite certain misgivings that I mentioned in my notes on having recently read the book, I liked it, and believe that it's appeal will be long lasting. I'm not sure that "I love" to read about thi..."

I think they learn lessons. Then go on to make even bigger mistakes and have to learn all over again.


message 11: by Kressel (last edited Jan 28, 2013 09:32AM) (new) - rated it 5 stars

Kressel Housman Nichola wrote: "I think they learn lessons. Then go on to make even bigger mistakes and have to learn all over again.

True. But things have improved for blacks in America since this book was written and certainly since the 1930's when it was set. It's not perfect, but it is improved.


Nichola Kressel wrote: "Nichola wrote: "I think they learn lessons. Then go on to make even bigger mistakes and have to learn all over again.

True. But things have improved for blacks in America since this book was writt..."


Yes, the mistakes they make are not always of the same kind. You would have thought people would have learned from the holocaust or the apartheid movement but there still seems to be an awful lot of ignorance and prejudice around :(


message 13: by Anja (last edited Feb 03, 2013 03:33AM) (new) - rated it 4 stars

Anja Weber After,twenty years I read the book again and returned to the wondrous world of childhood, fantasy, and the American South. Maybe the world has changed the way of thinking of the world but the beauty of words and the other moral lesson. In a sense, it may look like a " How To Kill a Mockingbird", theme overcome, as deja vu; bygone centuries, but the narrative remains for all those who love literature, something to which we always return.But still we have prejudices not just for Blacks in America..and wrong judgments..this is my point of view...


Lit Bug Kressel wrote: "I'll bite. But it seems almost redundant to say this book will have lasting value as it's 50 years old and was awarded "Novel of the 20th Century" by the ALA."

I believe this book will be even more valuable now and in the future, because one of the main issues in the world now is that of racism, albeit in a different form. This book discusses ethics, feminism, racism, kindness, prejudices, the issue of being judgemental based on superficial beliefs and observations, stereotyping of people and communities... And it just not discusses these, it shows a way of living that will be even more important for the generations who come, who are raised to doubt each other, fear and loathe and hate each other.

I've read it about 14 times in the last 4 years, and yet I read it, whenever I want to analyse myself. Being an atheist, this is my personal bible.


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