Agatha Christie Lovers discussion

And Then There Were None
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Book of the Month Reads > July 2013 - And Then There Were None

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Carolyn F. | 2951 comments Mod
Originally published in 1939.

First, there were ten - a curious assortment of strangers summoned as weekend guests to a private island off the coast of Devon. Their host, an eccentric millionaire unknown to all of them, is nowhere to be found. All that the guests have in common is a wicked past they're unwilling to reveal - and a secret that will seal their fate. For each has been marked for murder. One by one they fall prey. Before the weekend is out, there will be none. And only the dead are above suspicion


Leah Madsen (PrincessLeia) | 12 comments I love this book. Christie is the master of suspense and mystery


Carolyn F. | 2951 comments Mod
I haven't read this in years but I remember almost all of it. Can't wait to read it :)


Ghadeer Kja (ghadeer_kja) | 2 comments Am confused a little bit, the topics are randomly listed and I really want to read this book. So have you read it already or as it listed on July 2013? Sorry for bothering but am new here :)


message 5: by ☯Emily has reviews on Booklikes (last edited Mar 02, 2013 07:50PM) (new) - rated it 4 stars

☯Emily has reviews on Booklikes | 7012 comments We are supposed to read it as a group in July. You can wait to read it or read it now and comment on the book in July. I believe we are reading the books in order of publication. I can't wait to read it again.


Carolyn F. | 2951 comments Mod
Yes, we are reading the books in order of publication Ghadeer. We just put in the discussions ahead of time for convenience sake and also if people happen to read it early and want to make a comment. You can make comments on previous reads too. We'll always have those open.


Coey According to wiki, this book sold over 100 million copies and is the best selling detective novel in the history. Does anyone know why this is book is so special? I am a huge Agatha Christie fan and have read all her long stories. I am just curious to why this book stands out so much to the rest.


Katherine | 43 comments Were can i get a list of the future monthly reads?


message 9: by ☯Emily has reviews on Booklikes (last edited Apr 09, 2013 09:36PM) (new) - rated it 4 stars

☯Emily has reviews on Booklikes | 7012 comments Katherine wrote: "Were can i get a list of the future monthly reads?"

This is the listing:


http://www.goodreads.com/topic/show/4...

It hasn't been updated since December, but we are following the order of publication, so it will tell you the order. It is easy enough to determine the next read.


☯Emily has reviews on Booklikes | 7012 comments This links to the discussions and when each book has been or will be discussed:

http://www.goodreads.com/topic/group_...


Katherine | 43 comments Thanks for that Emily. I have some catching up to do :)


Randee Baty | 27 comments This was my first Agatha Christie book. It terrified me as a 5th grader. I was completely sold on her after reading this.


Carolyn F. | 2951 comments Mod
I'll be on vacation next week with wi-fi only at the restaurant at the bottom of the hill so I'll add this as a current read this month to make sure it's done. You can get started a little early if you'd like.


Pavan (pavanj7) | 1 comments i feel that climax is little clumsy


Vikram | 1 comments Lovely book. Takes a long time to find out 'who-dunnit' !

It was earlier published as 'Ten Little Niggers'.

Movie was also great :)


RebeccaS (RebeccaKS) | 15 comments One of my favorite AC books of all time! It's also the first one I ever read (for school) and it got me hooked.


Randee Baty | 27 comments Vikram wrote: "Lovely book. Takes a long time to find out 'who-dunnit' !

It was earlier published as 'Ten Little Niggers'.

Movie was also great :)"


Has there been more than one movie? The old black and white one that I saw had a very different ending from the book.


message 18: by Denise (last edited Jun 26, 2013 11:45AM) (new) - rated it 4 stars

Denise (Dulcinea3) | 259 comments There have been several movies. Christie also wrote this story as a play, which did have a different ending, and the movies usually use that ending, rather than the one in the novel.

Another earlier title for the novel was Ten Little Indians; there have been movies made under this title, as well as And Then There Were None.


Randee Baty | 27 comments I see. I didn't realize the play had a different ending. Now I'm the type to want to find all the movie versions of the book and compare them.


Peter Reynard (peterreynard) | 21 comments Coey wrote: "According to wiki, this book sold over 100 million copies and is the best selling detective novel in the history. Does anyone know why this is book is so special? I am a huge Agatha Christie fan ..."

I'm not sure exactly why but it could be because the ending is quite the twist. You kinda go "But... But... that's not possible". Also, when you start you are wondering how in the world Christie is going to make this suspenseful given the premise, but she does it. That's my non-spoiler possible reason for why it is so popular. I personally like The Murder of Roger Ackroyd better.


Carol. [All cynic, all the time] | 14 comments I would think it is also because she defied normal detective story rules-this hadn't been done before.


Victoria_Grossack Grossack (VictoriaGrossack) | 67 comments Carol wrote: "I would think it is also because she defied normal detective story rules-this hadn't been done before."

Yes, but in a way it is a natural outgrowth of the story "Cards on the Table" in which another person is collecting guilty. It reminds me too, of Curtain, because (view spoiler).


Victoria_Grossack Grossack (VictoriaGrossack) | 67 comments PS I was also terrified the first time I read it. And I think her solution was extremely satisfying.


Randee Baty | 27 comments I'm glad to know it scared someone else! I don't normally think of Agatha Christie as scary but this one certainly was.


Jules | 3 comments I'm so excited to participate in this read along! I've just read three Agatha Christie books in a row and I'm hooked!


Denise (Dulcinea3) | 259 comments Finished last night. Of course, once you've read it, you will never forget the solution, but it was fun to follow the progress of the story again, and match the murders to the poem.

If anybody remembers The Avengers, there was an episode (with Mrs. Peel) based loosely on this novel. It was called The Superlative Seven, and Steed was invited to a costume party on an island, with a mysterious unseen host. The guests were all experts in different types of combat.


Larry Loftis | 1 comments The best mystery novel ever. An amazing book by an amazing author.


Randee Baty | 27 comments Wasn't there an episode of Remington Steele with a plot based on this book?


Maria Yohn (mariay99) | 5 comments I think that this and The Murder of Roger Ackroyd are my favorite Agatha Christie books.


Agatha Christie | 25 comments this novel...hmpf!i've just started it and there is so much going through my mind already! has anyone else found that nursery rhyme creepy?? I do, but mostly cause Green uses little boys in his rhyme!!?


Victoria_Grossack Grossack (VictoriaGrossack) | 67 comments What I liked about the solution:

(view spoiler)


message 32: by ☯Emily has reviews on Booklikes (last edited Jul 08, 2013 01:45PM) (new) - rated it 4 stars

☯Emily has reviews on Booklikes | 7012 comments Even though I had read this before and remember something of the ending, the suspense was almost unbearable. When I went to bed last night, I kept hearing noises in the room, just like Blore and Vera were experiencing!

Does anyone see any significance to the name Vera, which means truth or true? Was she really guilty or just felt guilty because she had wished evil on the small boy and then he died?


Denise (Dulcinea3) | 259 comments (view spoiler)


Jules | 3 comments I'm reading this for the first time and really enjoying. I can't for the life of me figure out how this will end but it's got me stumped as to who the murderer is!


☯Emily has reviews on Booklikes | 7012 comments Denise wrote: "I agree Victoria. It was certainly someone passing judgment on them. Plus, he kept taking charge of things.

Emily, I don't know if you've finished yet, so I don't want to spoil things (even thou..."


I finished the book, but the name Vera really bothers me. I don't think Christie chose that name by accident.


Denise (Dulcinea3) | 259 comments Could have been worse - she could have used Verity.


☯Emily has reviews on Booklikes | 7012 comments In the play Christie wrote by the same name, there is a different ending involving Vera. I briefly skimmed it last night and the question remains, why was the name Vera used?


Victoria_Grossack Grossack (VictoriaGrossack) | 67 comments Vera at sparknotes:
http://www.sparknotes.com/lit/andthen...

(view spoiler)

My own take:

(view spoiler)


☯Emily has reviews on Booklikes | 7012 comments Victoria_Grossack wrote: "Vera at sparknotes:
http://www.sparknotes.com/lit/andthen...


Vera Claythorne

Vera Claythorne is a former governess who is working as a “games mistress at a third-class school” w..."


Thanks for your post which includes how her name is important to the understanding of the book.


Victoria_Grossack Grossack (VictoriaGrossack) | 67 comments Well, it's just my understanding of how the name could matter. But I thought your question was interesting.

Do you think the other names are significant, too? Here's a list. I don't have opinions about most.

Judge Lawrence Wargrave (view spoiler)
Philip Lombard
Isaac Morris
General MacArthur - obviously not the same general who became so famous in WW II.
Emily Brent
Dr. Armstrong
William Henry Blore
Thomas Rogers
Ethel Rogers
Tony Marston
Vera Claythorne


message 41: by ☯Emily has reviews on Booklikes (last edited Jul 04, 2013 09:21AM) (new) - rated it 4 stars

☯Emily has reviews on Booklikes | 7012 comments No, none of the other names other than Vera and General MacArthur seemed significant; I don't think Christie was referring to our General MacArthur, since the book was published in 1939. The rest of the names seem to be ordinary English names, which could be planned. Seemingly ordinary people can commit murder and they might be your next door neighbor or your doctor.


Randee Baty | 27 comments This discussion is quite interesting because it never occurred to me that the name Vera meant anything. She does seem to be the only one bothered by what she did, as several others here have mentioned.


Jules | 3 comments Just finished the book. I was on the edge of my seat right up until the end. The ending was so satisfying. Agatha Christie is a genius!


message 44: by Denise (last edited Jul 04, 2013 12:15PM) (new) - rated it 4 stars

Denise (Dulcinea3) | 259 comments I'm not so sure that Vera is bothered by what she did so much as she is bothered that Hugo abandoned her afterwards. I think that she believed that Hugo wanted Cyril eliminated so that he could inherit, and she expected to be rewarded for helping him achieve his goal. Unfortunately for her, she completely misread Hugo. It's Hugo's loss that she mourns, not Cyril's.

What I found most disturbing in the novel was the attitude by various characters that Lombard's 'crime' was not so bad, because they were only natives, who didn't mind dying.

I think that possibly Armstrong feels the most guilt for his crime.


☯Emily has reviews on Booklikes | 7012 comments Denise wrote: "I'm not so sure that Vera is bothered by what she did so much as she is bothered that Hugo abandoned her afterwards. I think that she believed that Hugo wanted Cyril eliminated so that he could in..."

Unfortunately, that attitude towards Lombard's "crime" is very common today. Many of the same people who oppose abortion see nothing wrong in using drones to kill "those radical Muslims," but are usually children, the elderly and women. Anyone different from "us" are not really humans with feelings and emotions.


Victoria_Grossack Grossack (VictoriaGrossack) | 67 comments ☯Emily wrote: Unfortunately, that attitude towards Lombard's "crime" is very common today. Many of the same people who oppose abortion see nothing wrong in using drones to kill "those radical Muslims," but are usually children, the elderly and women. Anyone different from "us" are not really humans with feelings and emotions

What amazes me that when we talk about the cost of the Iraq War, only the number of Americans killed is usually given. Yet thousands and thousands of Iraqis were killed - some of the estimates go as high as a million. Not always directly by Americans, but by powers unleashed by Americans on assertions that were obvious lies (obvious to the rest of the world). Yet those deaths are basically ignored.

So you are right - the same attitude still exists. Many lives are considered less important than others.


☯Emily has reviews on Booklikes | 7012 comments Victoria_Grossack wrote: "☯Emily wrote: Unfortunately, that attitude towards Lombard's "crime" is very common today. Many of the same people who oppose abortion see nothing wrong in using drones to kill "those radical Musli..."

Agree 100%.


☯Emily has reviews on Booklikes | 7012 comments Denise wrote: "I'm not so sure that Vera is bothered by what she did so much as she is bothered that Hugo abandoned her afterwards. I think that she believed that Hugo wanted Cyril eliminated so that he could in..."

It is true that Armstrong felt great remorse and he also learned from his mistake. I think it indicates that he stopped drinking after that or stopped before operating. Mrs. Rogers also seemed full of regret and fear about helping her husband.


Carol | 53 comments Looking forward to joining this discussion! I've just started the book, with the introduction of the 10 suspects. I want this one to last all of July!


Victoria_Grossack Grossack (VictoriaGrossack) | 67 comments The fact that this is set in the 1930s (published 1939) is a great advantage for the story. No cell phones. In fact, not many phones. People are truly trapped on that island.

Nowadays, if storytellers want people to be so very incommunicado, they have to resort to ruses or even supernatural explanations (thinking of the TV series Lost). Admittedly, Christie arranged the weather so that it served her story.


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