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Sword and Laser Video Show > Kindle Fire HD, what do you think?

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message 1: by Tim (new)

Tim (Hamanneggs) | 3 comments I don't read on my iPad for one reason, it's not high enough contrast (I have the iPad 2). With the Kindle Fire HD 7" and 10" they seem to have fixed that. I'm wondering if anyone else is buying or planning on getting one of these for reading and the occasional movie or game.

Thanks!


message 2: by Tony (new)

Tony | 33 comments I didn't like reading on the original iPad, but have no issues with the iPad 3, so I imagine the Kindle Fire HD would be good. That said, I bought a new Kindle Paperwhite. I wanted an alternative to the iPad for use outdoors, so the Fire wouldn't help. (Another reason for getting the kindle is so I can take advantage of the lending library.) I use both regularly.


message 3: by Christopher (new)

Christopher | 16 comments I have an old Kindle and if I ever need to replace it, I will likely get a paperwhite version. My wife has the non-HD fire and thought it is nice, I really do prefer eInk for reading.


message 4: by Charlie (new)

Charlie | 46 comments I have the nexus 7 and I almost made the Eco plunge because I love me some amazon products lol. I think its a good media consuming device. even better than iPad mini when considering price and tech specs.


message 5: by Kris (new)

Kris (KVolk) | 796 comments I love my Kindle Fire but I only really use at home under ideal reading conditions.


message 6: by Rick (new)

Rick | 988 comments This story http://boingboing.net/2012/10/22/kind... - is why I won't use a Kindle. I'll buy from them if I have to, but there's no way I'm tying my ebook collection to them or any other DRMed source.


message 7: by aldenoneil (new)

aldenoneil | 1000 comments Rick wrote: "This story http://boingboing.net/2012/10/22/kind... - is why I won't use a Kindle. I'll buy from them if I have to, but there's no way I'm tying my ebook collection to t..."

That freaked me out, too. I've increasingly been using my Kindle as a library terminal, anyway, and this recent development means that, until their stance changes, I won't likely buy another ebook from Amazon.


message 8: by terpkristin (new)

terpkristin | 3049 comments I'll let you decide for yourself if you're OK with this, ethically. http://kottke.org/12/10/how-to-perman...


message 9: by Christopher (new)

Christopher | 16 comments Yeah, the Calibre program has been out there awhile. So has the DRM/Cloud issue. But, I suspect it will soon be forgotten again like most topics. Look how much major companies are pushing "all your stuff is safe on the cloud." Amazon, Apple, Microsoft, Google, etc. are all pushing it. It is a long-term strategy for these companies. As the hardware becomes cheaper and semi-disposable, it now becomes a good strategy instead to charge for a service rather than a thing. The service is access to information. No matter who created it, even yourself. Think about it.


message 10: by Kathryn (new)

Kathryn Handel | 124 comments aldenoneil wrote: "Rick wrote: "This story http://boingboing.net/2012/10/22/kind... - is why I won't use a Kindle. I'll buy from them if I have to, but there's no way I'm tying my ebook co..."

I have to say the story seems rather odd to me. Either

1. It's made up.
2. There's something she's not telling us (As in she did something against the toa that got her account legitimately banned).

Amazon has the best customer service I've ever encountered for a web based company. My family has five kindles between us and we've traded them to each other, swapped accounts on devices, sold and bought from amazon and secondhand and we've never, ever had an issue. You can call Amazon directly and within minutes get a human on the line (I can't speak for other countries but for Amazon US it's a real feat that there are English speaking Americans on the end of the line not someone in India reading off a script.)

And if there was a real problem with Amazon taking her ebooks with no reason she could go through her credit card company to get the money back that she paid for those books as if this were a true story would be very close to fraud and your credit card company will go to bat for you to get all issues relating to fraud/online sketchiness fixed in your favor.


message 11: by Nicklaus (last edited Oct 27, 2012 05:14PM) (new)

Nicklaus | 10 comments On this DRM issue i have two elements that are, while not "generally relevant" to the goodreads community, quite relevant to me AND BILLIONS OF INTERNATIONAL BUYERS.

1st - Nationality. I'm canadian. French canadian to be exact (there is 8 millions of us mainly in two provinces). THUS, customer service from a United-States-of-America-based company is both irrelevant, QUITE HARD to understand if it were provided (i might READ english, but speaking is another matter) and inapplicable; they are not legally obligated to provide me with any service. Meh. So 5 billions non-english-spanish "NO"s right there for amazon :(.

2nd- The DRM war. We are fighting. It might be on the other side of that entertainment fence at the back of your yard, where the "interactive" stuff (you know, GAMES) is happening, but it's on the same town, it's your in your data-owners' neighbourhood; buyer's rights. It may be that my gamer side oversteps into my reader side; it's mostly that corporations are in an everconvergent path, and that if they are allowed SOMEWHERE to legally OWN what WE paid for, someone will eventually extend it to their comfy little plot of net-land ...that and they WON'T forget the legal precedent it creates.
Funny that the most successive games (in terms of profit-by-investment) to have captured the masses attention those last years (like Witcher) understood the damage DRM does to their own industry; non-DRM games sell better while they cost less to publish, and if we were to look into books, i wouldn't be surprised to see the same trend. It's the old OLD electricity-petrolum for cars of the early years debate again: why yes, a little work and those cars would be almost autonomous (in the decades of research car went through perspective), but why make a product that promotes independence when we can hook them up on petrol for eternity?
Addicts are so, SO profitable... be on the Cloud, on energy or on drugs.


message 12: by Terez (new)

Terez (Terez07) | 83 comments I have the original kindle fire and I enjoy it. When I upgrade, it will most definitely be to the Fire HD. The ipad mini doesn't have an HD screen, and cost $130 more than the Kindle Fire HD.


message 13: by AndrewP (new)

AndrewP (AndrewCa) | 1501 comments It's not just Amazon. If you read the small print for Apples iBooks3 update this now has a 'feature' to allow Apple to automatically update your library. The only thing that surprised me about this is that Apple did not tout it as an 'innovation' they invented :)


message 14: by Thurman (new)

Thurman (nycblkboy) | 145 comments I wonder what they would do with content that isn't there's. You might not know you could but almost any book,tv show,podcast, audiobook, etc can be added to your kindle. Without paying Amazon.. They provide the service so it doesn't go against their terms. Would they ignore these files when they see them?


message 15: by AndrewP (new)

AndrewP (AndrewCa) | 1501 comments Thurman wrote: "I wonder what they would do with content that isn't there's. You might not know you could but almost any book,tv show,podcast, audiobook, etc can be added to your kindle. Without paying Amazon.. Th..."

They should be ignored as almost everything you add manually to your kindle goes into the 'Documents' category. Even if they are e-books. For example, I recently added most of David Weber's Honor Harrington books from the CD that Baen provides with their hardbacks. They are all in .mobi format, but Amazon puts them into the Docs category.
Even if you mess with the metadata to fool amazon into syncing your page bookmarks, they still show as Docs. So they SHOULD be safe.


message 16: by Charlie (new)

Charlie | 46 comments I assume they ignore it since it is stored locally and does not have to endure a DRM verification in their market apps.


message 17: by Brent (new)

Brent Wise (brentwise) | 1 comments i always hated the idea of e-readers, then broke down and finally got a kindle fire and now i like to read everything on it and rebuy paper books i got on the kindle.

also, its great to switch your country on amazon to UK (if you are in US) to be able to buy/download those pesky books that are being released in UK months before US (just did it w/ red country a few weeks ago and worked perfect!)


message 18: by Carmen (new)

Carmen | 7 comments thinking of getting a kindle fire for graphic novels. Im going to be pretty mobile in the future and want to take all books in all forms with me. I have a regular kindle and I'll probably keep that for my ereader but im wondering just how good the fire is for graphic novels.


message 19: by Thurman (new)

Thurman (nycblkboy) | 145 comments Brent wrote: "i always hated the idea of e-readers, then broke down and finally got a kindle fire and now i like to read everything on it and rebuy paper books i got on the kindle.

also, its great to switch you..."


I have used it with comics And that was good but not great. Those were comic I loaded. Amazon has a feature that zooms in on each frame. that should be better for reading


message 20: by Joseph (new)

Joseph | 1175 comments Thurman wrote: "I have used it with comics And that was good but not great. Those were comic I loaded. Amazon has a feature that zooms in on each frame. that should be better for reading..."

That's why if/when I get a Fire or similar device, I want to get the 10" version.


message 21: by Thurman (last edited Nov 17, 2012 07:28PM) (new)

Thurman (nycblkboy) | 145 comments Joseph wrote: "Thurman wrote: "I have used it with comics And that was good but not great. Those were comic I loaded. Amazon has a feature that zooms in on each frame. that should be better for reading..."

That'..."


That might be a problem, They stoped making it. And when they it cost $400 and was only black and white, you want an iPad :(


message 22: by Aildiin (new)

Aildiin | 126 comments Thurman wrote: "Brent wrote: "i always hated the idea of e-readers, then broke down and finally got a kindle fire and now i like to read everything on it and rebuy paper books i got on the kindle.

also, its great..."


I've been reading a lot of comics on my kindle fire too and if I may give you some advice , try the Comixology app.
Their technology for zooming comics is light years ahead of the one used by Amazon and while some of the comics are more expensive on Comixology ( the Walking Dead are about 1$ more per graphic novel) they compensate that by having comics sales very often on their web site ( the drawback is that you have to make the purchases from the web site as sales or DC comics do not appear on the app).


message 23: by Thurman (new)

Thurman (nycblkboy) | 145 comments If I had to choose iPad mini, Kindle HD or regular Kindle.I will always pick the regular Kindle. I love to read and the bright screens hurt my eyes. But with calibre I can have any book I want


message 24: by David Sven (new)

David Sven (Gorro) | 1570 comments I got a Kindle HD for my daughter for Christmas, because its prettier and has colour etc and doubles at a tablet. But I got myself the Paperwhite because I read a lot and like the idea of being able to read in any light without straining my eyes.

My only gripe is that I'm in Australia, which means I have no access to the Amazon App store. But I don't mind sideloading apps from another Android store.
I feel like going back to all the electronics stores and throttling them for insisting I should buy the older models because they claimed they don't work in Australia. They work fine.


message 25: by Leslie (new)

Leslie (LeslieHW) | 97 comments I was not satisfied enough with my first gen Kindle Fire to invest in the Kindle HD.


message 26: by Aildiin (new)

Aildiin | 126 comments I have the original Kindle fire and I am very happy with it.
I played with the new Kindle fire HD 8.9inch (there isn't a 10 inch model) and I like it a lot. I was afraid it would be too big or heavy but it isn't.
It's much better to surf the web or read comics.
I was very tempted to buy it on the spot but I have decided to resist the temptation and wait until Christmas 2013 to upgrade.


message 27: by Aildiin (new)

Aildiin | 126 comments the Goodread app makes it very easy and fast to update your reading status as soon as you are finished reading for the day too (without having to switch device that is)


message 28: by Rick (new)

Rick | 988 comments Thurman wrote: "If I had to choose iPad mini, Kindle HD or regular Kindle.I will always pick the regular Kindle. I love to read and the bright screens hurt my eyes. But with calibre I can have any book I want"

Turn. Brightness. Down.

The reason people's eyes hurt on LCDs like the iPad is because they leave the brightness up. You can turn it down to like 5-10% and it's fine. Much more like a Kindle brightness and not stressful on the eyes. If you look at a book it doesn't have the brightness or contrast even on very white paper.

Me, I read on a retina iPad because I read othr things (Flipboard, Zite, etc) and want other apps. Too, I don't like being chained to one store so Nook and Kindle are out.


message 29: by Kathryn (new)

Kathryn Handel | 124 comments Rick wrote: "Thurman wrote: "If I had to choose iPad mini, Kindle HD or regular Kindle.I will always pick the regular Kindle. I love to read and the bright screens hurt my eyes. But with calibre I can have any ..."

I flip mine so it's white text on a black background and I find that the easiest on my eyes for long reading (2-3+ hours at a time).


message 30: by Thurman (new)

Thurman (nycblkboy) | 145 comments Rick wrote: "Thurman wrote: "If I had to choose iPad mini, Kindle HD or regular Kindle.I will always pick the regular Kindle. I love to read and the bright screens hurt my eyes. But with calibre I can have any ..."

Kathryn wrote: "Rick wrote: "Thurman wrote: "If I had to choose iPad mini, Kindle HD or regular Kindle.I will always pick the regular Kindle. I love to read and the bright screens hurt my eyes. But with calibre I ..."

To much work. The Kindle just works :)


message 31: by Timothy (last edited Dec 22, 2012 10:01PM) (new)

Timothy Pecoraro | 224 comments I've tried it out in the store and it looks like a great piece of hardware. But I'm still using the Kindle app on my phone. I love being able to read a book, literally anywhere. Its so great!


message 32: by Leo (last edited Dec 23, 2012 08:09PM) (new)

Leo Shurtleff (SqueezeToyAliens) | 9 comments My wife got the the last generation Kindle (pre-Paperwhite) for me last Xmas. She liked it so much she started using it too. I got her a Kindle Fire after it came out because she reads mostly at night and I didn't want her to have to fiddle with a book light. She liked it well enough but it gets heavy after awhile. Granted, printed books can be heavier but you also hold them differently from a Kindle, usually propped up on your lap. She also switched to white text on black background and was much easier on her eyes at night.

We recently decided to get my wife the Paperwhite for this Xmas due to the lighter weight and built-in light. However, the Fire is being put to good use. We are re-gifting it to our 7 year old son for Xmas as his "new Netflix-Angry Birds-Plants vs Zombies" machine.

My personal opinion: go with e-ink if you are consuming lots of text. If you want to mix it up with movies and a few apps the Fire is nice tablet. I have been quite happy with both when used according to their strengths and weaknesses.


message 33: by Robert (new)

Robert | 46 comments I enjoy using my standard (first edition) kindle fire for reading. Usually reading in bed at night - lights off and find myself turning down the brightness, but no complaints whatsoever using it for reading.


message 34: by Colleen (new)

Colleen (MKColleen) | 8 comments I received a Kindle Fire HD for Christmas. Still learning all about it. I did set the reading display to sepia background. Much easier on my eyes and won't light up a room in the dark. Proud to say I've still never played Angry Birds, ever, on anything!


message 35: by Jessica (new)

Jessica | 4 comments Up until now, I have kept to reading traditional physical books. Now that I have a little extra money to spare, I would like to get an ereader but my big dilemna is which one? I was hoping some people could speak from experience here and help me decide...

I really like the idea of the Nook E-ink or Kindle Paperwhite, because I spend enough time on the computer as it is (and I don't want to add more strain on my already poor eyesight) and I like that you can read in direct sunlight etc. However as I don't have any sort of tablet it would be cool to purchase either the Nook HD, Kindle Fire, or iPad, but then that gets me thinking that the internet would just distract me from my main objective of reading. I have a laptop and a smart phone, what's the point of a tablet?

Anyway, I would greatly appreciate your advice! I will just add that my main purpose for whatever device I purchase will be reading (duh). I don't know very much about ereaders formatting though. Like can you download library ebooks onto any device? Can you only make Amazon purchases on the kindle and B&N purchases on the Nook, etc? Or do all devices accept various ebook formatting?


message 36: by Igor (new)

Igor (igork) | 105 comments I would never use any tablet for long reading, not even Fire, as it's to tiring for eyes. As far as I'm concerned, e-ink is the only solution for reading on electronic devices, nothing even come close to it.
I have Kindle Touch and it's impressive and will buy Paperwhite for my wife as she prefer reading in bed.


message 37: by Jonathan (last edited Jan 05, 2013 01:30PM) (new)

Jonathan | 185 comments I have both a nook color and, as of December 19th, a Kindle Fire HD. Ended up getting both as a matter of convenience and expense as I can get most of my required readings/watchings in cheaper space-saving formats. So far, I love the Kindle Fire HD. It works well and I've already got some of my readings for the next semester on it. So far I have been splitting my time evenly between the Kindle, Nook and hard copies of books.


message 38: by Melissa (new)

Melissa (drunkandfreaky) | 5 comments I have 3 Nooks; the simple touch, the color, and the HD+. Love them all. My main reasons for going with the nook is because Amazon uses the .mobi files and that kind of locks you into always buying a kindle if you don't want to lose your books. Since every other (the ones I'm aware off) ereader uses epub, I am able to buy an e-reader from a different company and all my B&N books could be easily transferred. Plus, Kobo (another epub reader) is about the only site that has book coupons; I buy a lot of my books there and sideload them onto my nook.


message 39: by Aildiin (new)

Aildiin | 126 comments I must be the only person that actually prefers reading on my Kindle fire over my regular kindle but for me it's really a no brainer.
The text looks a lot better on the Fire than on the regular kindle. I don't really mind the lighting and sometime I read for 3-4 hours in a row.
Purchasing books is a pleasure on the fire, it's a pain on the regular kindle (to the point I was switching to my laptop to buy them) .
I can effortlessly switch from the books I am reading to Goodreads and back again, same thing for surfing the web...
And finally for the question of purchasing a kindle, a nook or any other brand I asked myself which of those companies will still be around in 10 years or more. And frankly I rather put my money on Amazon than on Barnes and Nobles...


message 40: by Melissa (new)

Melissa (drunkandfreaky) | 5 comments Barnes and Noble separated/or is in the process of separating their physical book stores from their digital store. Even when the brick and mortar stores are gone the digital side will still be around.

Even if I felt B&Ns death was imminent, I, personally, won't buy a Kindle until they support the ePub format. I'd buy an iPad, it's easy enough to load my epubs into iTunes and load them on that device. While its true you can just put the kindle app on an iPad or tablet, I find it annoying to have to remember which store I bought a book from, so I know which app to open. Just easier to have everything in iBooks.


message 41: by Thurman (new)

Thurman (nycblkboy) | 145 comments Melissa wrote: "I have 3 Nooks; the simple touch, the color, and the HD+. Love them all. My main reasons for going with the nook is because Amazon uses the .mobi files and that kind of locks you into always buying..."

Yes Amazon does use the mobi format. But you can easily convert any, non drm, formatted book to mobi. And you can buy mobi books online from a lot of retailers.
Doesn't B/N have drm books too? And what are book coupons?


message 42: by Dan (new)

Dan Jones (goodevilgenius) | 13 comments I had an original Kindle Fire, until the screen got messed up (when I dropped it). Mine was rooted, and I rarely used the Amazon-specific stuff. I used it for general tablet computing stuff, and reading (both ebooks, and e-comics).

When my Fire broke, I got a cheap, used Pandigital Novel e-reader off eBay until I could get a new tablet. I got a Nexus 7 for Christmas (which is a significantly better tablet), but I continue to use my Pandigital reader for ebooks.

Unless you're way into the Amazon ecosystem, I wouldn't recommend getting a Kindle Fire HD. If you want a decent tablet, there are much better ones out there (like the Nexus 7). If you're just reading ebooks, get something with an e-ink display, and again, don't get a Kindle unless you're into the Amazon system. I don't like their DRM, and I don't like that their DRM is inoperable with other systems, and I don't like that they're the only ones who use their format. I prefer to use EPUB format, because it's more universally recognized. I rooted my Kindle Fire so that I could install another ebook app that supports EPUB.


message 43: by Melissa (new)

Melissa (drunkandfreaky) | 5 comments B&N does have DRM, but, epubs use Adobe Digital Editions to decode the drm. As long as the ereader is registered to my Adobe account I can read it on any device.

My first ereader was by Sony, so, I have a lot of books from their reader store. I have no problem (other than no cover art) loading and reading them on my Nook. Same if I want to read a drmed nook book on my Sony reader. I can easily read any book I buy on either device.


message 44: by Dan (new)

Dan Jones (goodevilgenius) | 13 comments Yep, exactly, @Melissa. While I personally am morally opposed to any kind of DRM, as long as we have to live with it, its best to go with a DRM scheme that's used on as many devices as possible. For ebooks, that's ADEPT (Adobe Digital Experience Protection Technology). It's usable on a large number of devices and apps.

Amazon DRM is only usable on Kindles. So, unless you intend to only ever use Kindles (or you intend to break US law by stripping the DRM), don't buy Amazon ebooks (and probably, just don't use Kindles).


message 45: by AndrewP (new)

AndrewP (AndrewCa) | 1501 comments For me one advantage I find the Kindle has over the Nook is the web store they are tied to. B&N website is a mess, it's really hard to find anything unless you know exactly what you are looking for.


message 46: by Jason (new)

Jason Caldon | 3 comments I have 3 Kindles and I love reading books on all of them. I have one of the Kindle Keyboards with e-ink. I really like it but if I wan't to read at night when my wife is sleeping I have to use a booklight. I have the first gen Kindle Fire and we have a new 8.9" Fire HD. I love using my first gen Fire. It's almost all I use. I did however change the page color to an off-white which was easier to read than the bright white that is the default. Also the new Kindle Fire has a thing called Kid's Time which is only 2.99 a month if you're a prime member or 4.99/month, I think, if you're not. It is great for kids. It has interactive books, regular e-books, pre-screened apps and games, and videos. My five year old daughter loves it.


message 47: by Jessica (new)

Jessica | 4 comments Thank you for all the feedback everyone! I decided on the Kindle Paperwhite for now, and down the road I'll probably get a Fire HD too. I'm definitely excited to start "e-reading" lol. :)


message 48: by Igor (new)

Igor (igork) | 105 comments Right way to go Jessica, if you want books go for Paperwhite, if you need multimedia solution go for Fire, simple as that :-)


message 49: by Jessica (new)

Jessica | 4 comments Igor, I totally agree. And I am all about the books :)


message 50: by Terry (new)

Terry Simpson | 26 comments I enjoy my Kindle Fire HD. Nice hardware for the price.
As for DRM, some companies like TOR had given it up, although Hatchette has been saying to demand DRM outside of their territories.
Tor ditches DRM, Hachette demands its authors ask for DRM


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