Popular Iranian Revolution Books

Popular Iranian Revolution Books (showing 1-19 of 19)
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Reading Lolita in Tehran Reading Lolita in Tehran (Paperback)
by (shelved 1 time as iranian-revolution)
avg rating 3.54 — 139,522 ratings — published 2003
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A Bitter Veil A Bitter Veil (Paperback)
by (shelved 1 time as iranian-revolution)
avg rating 3.94 — 611 ratings — published 2012
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The Culture of Terrorism The Culture of Terrorism (Paperback)
by (shelved 1 time as iranian-revolution)
avg rating 4.12 — 404 ratings — published 1989
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Het huis van de moskee Het huis van de moskee (Hardcover)
by (shelved 1 time as iranian-revolution)
avg rating 3.88 — 2,313 ratings — published 2005
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Hitch-22: A Memoir Hitch-22: A Memoir (Hardcover)
by (shelved 1 time as iranian-revolution)
avg rating 3.99 — 17,328 ratings — published 2010
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Ali Khamenei Ali Khamenei (Hardcover)
by (shelved 1 time as iranian-revolution)
avg rating 0.0 — 8 ratings — published 2007
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Prisoner of Tehran: A Memoir Prisoner of Tehran: A Memoir (Hardcover)
by (shelved 1 time as iranian-revolution)
avg rating 4.15 — 7,278 ratings — published 2007
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Azar Nafisi
“Those who are close to us, when they die, divide our world. There is the world of the living, which we finally, in one way or another, succumb to, and then there is the domain of the dead that, like an imaginary friend (or foe) or a secret concubine, constantly beckons, reminding us of our loss. What is memory but a ghost that lurks at the corners of the mind, interrupting our normal course of life, disrupting our sleep in order to remind us of some acute pain or pleasure, something silenced or ignored? We miss not only their presence, or how they felt about us, but ultimately how they allowed us to feel about ourselves or them. (prologue)”
Azar Nafisi, Things I've Been Silent About: Memories

Christopher Hitchens
“As he defended the book one evening in the early 1980s at the Carnegie Endowment in New York, I knew that some of what he said was true enough, just as some of it was arguably less so. (Edward incautiously dismissed 'speculations about the latest conspiracy to blow up buildings or sabotage commercial airliners' as the feverish product of 'highly exaggerated stereotypes.') Covering Islam took as its point of departure the Iranian revolution, which by then had been fully counter-revolutionized by the forces of the Ayatollah. Yes, it was true that the Western press—which was one half of the pun about 'covering'—had been naïve if not worse about the Pahlavi regime. Yes, it was true that few Middle East 'analysts' had had any concept of the latent power of Shi'ism to create mass mobilization. Yes, it was true that almost every stage of the Iranian drama had come as a complete surprise to the media. But wasn't it also the case that Iranian society was now disappearing into a void of retrogressive piety that had levied war against Iranian Kurdistan and used medieval weaponry such as stoning and amputation against its internal critics, or even against those like unveiled women whose very existence constituted an offense?”
Christopher Hitchens, Hitch-22: A Memoir

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