Popular Dissociative Identity Disorder Books

(showing 1-50 of 162)
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Identical Identical (Hardcover)
by (shelved 6 times as dissociative-identity-disorder)
avg rating 4.35 — 91,964 ratings — published 2008
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First Person Plural: My Life as a Multiple First Person Plural: My Life as a Multiple (Paperback)
by (shelved 4 times as dissociative-identity-disorder)
avg rating 4.04 — 4,911 ratings — published 1999
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Pretty Girl-13 Pretty Girl-13 (Hardcover)
by (shelved 2 times as dissociative-identity-disorder)
avg rating 4.00 — 14,850 ratings — published 2013
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After After (Hardcover)
by (shelved 2 times as dissociative-identity-disorder)
avg rating 3.73 — 37,264 ratings — published 2009
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Dear Little Ones Dear Little Ones (Paperback)
by (shelved 2 times as dissociative-identity-disorder)
avg rating 4.50 — 48 ratings — published 2015
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“The way in which the therapist perceives the client coming for counseling is one of the most powerful elements of the therapeutic process. It is very easy, and very common, for therapists working with ritual abuse survivors to see their clients in a one-down position, as in the doctor-patient medical model where, too often, distancing protects the doctor and dehumanizes the patient. By that I mean the client is seen as the "sick" one, and the therapist is the powerful one who will help the poor sick client.

Hopefully, the therapist is functioning at a higher level of mental health than is the client, but it is a mistake to take that to mean that the therapist should assume a role of power over the client. Actually, clients are often coping well given what they are coping with. One of the easiest errors made is in the use of power in the therapeutic relationship, and what therapists frequently fail to see is how their own use of power, though benign in spirit, actually replicated the systematic, hierarchical misuse of power within the cult.”
Lynette S Danylchuk

“There is no evidence of spontaneous remission or integration of personality alters without mental health treatment. Therapy is long-term and requires the establishment of a strong therapeutic relationship with the individual.”
Danny Wedding, Movies And Mental Illness: Using Films To Understand Psychopathology

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